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  1. mrjoec's Avatar
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    #21  
    I, too, have been feeling this for years. I always thought my mind was just playing tricks on me. Funny thing is, sometimes my phone DOES vibrate and I don't feel it. With certain pants, where the pockets are a bit looser. So all day long, I'm checking when I think I'm feeling a vibration and it's nothing, and then I'm missing the vibrations when they actually occur.

    It'll be another ten or twenty years before we get all the advanced research studies indicating just how harmful all this modern technology is for us. Just like eggs, carbs, etc. No use worrying about it, really. These doctors are really just guessing, when it all comes down to it.

    The average lifespan is still increasing, so we must not be doing anything too harmful to ourselves. Mother Nature has to get rid of us one way or another, or else we'll have some serious overpopulation issues.
    mrjoec
    www.joecieplinski.com
  2. #22  
    I don't think it's necessarily due to a harmful effect of radiation. I used to live in a building that was structurally sound but would slightly vibrate when certain heavy trucks passed in front of it. I felt the floor shake, like a gentle tremor. Before I figured it out, I paid close attention to it for a period of time while trying to get a handle on when/why it was happening. In time I started feeling the shaking when it wasn't happening.

    I think it may have something to do with paying attention to it and anticipating it, which is the case for phone vibration. It could be that since the thing being anticipated is quite gentle/faint, the brain, in its attempts not to miss it, over compensates to the point of generating many false positives.
  3. #23  
    Is that a Treo in your pocket or are you just glad to see me? Seriously, no new name is needed; there already is one. It's called Bernhardt-Roth paraesthesia. If you carry any heavy or bulky object in your pocket constantly, you are likely to have these symptoms. The fact that the Treo vibrates is coincidental. You would get the same feeling if you carried a brick of the same size. The classic trigger for B-R is a big wad of keys kept in the pocket, but cell phones seem to be the latest manifestation.
    Treatment: Use a belt clip, and whistle "Good Vibrations". DOO-dee-doo-dee-dooooo, DOO-de-doo....
  4. #24  
    I just call it a Phantom Vibrate. Its been there since I started carrying a vibrating cell phone.
  5. #25  
    This happeneds to me and i alos had a color sidekick before my T600, sometime it would make me think i was getting an icoming call, i would check and there would be no call. weird stuff.
  6. #26  
    You gotta give up those polyester pants now!
    Ed
    Visor Deluxe, Prism, Visorphone, Treo 270, Treo 600, Treo 650, and am eagerly waiting for the next generation Treo...but wait...is that the iPhone????
  7. #27  
    Wow. It's not just me
  8. #28  
    Quote Originally Posted by tangible
    Is that a Treo in your pocket or are you just glad to see me? Seriously, no new name is needed; there already is one. It's called Bernhardt-Roth paraesthesia. If you carry any heavy or bulky object in your pocket constantly, you are likely to have these symptoms. The fact that the Treo vibrates is coincidental. You would get the same feeling if you carried a brick of the same size. The classic trigger for B-R is a big wad of keys kept in the pocket, but cell phones seem to be the latest manifestation.
    Treatment: Use a belt clip, and whistle "Good Vibrations". DOO-dee-doo-dee-dooooo, DOO-de-doo....
    B-R is something entirely different, isn't it? The descriptions I've read online talk about a serious dehibilitating pain or numbness, not phantom vibrations. This does NOT sound like what we're experiencing, at least not in a clinical sense, although I wouldn't be surprised if it's related.
    The paraesthesia consists of burning, tingling, stabbing pains of considerable severity or possibly only of a feeling of numbness. The sensory disturbances vary from slight hyperaesthesia to total anaesthesia.
    A tingling, formication, itching, and other forms of paresthesia in the outer side of the lower part of the thigh in the area of distribution of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve; there may be pain, but the skin is usually hypesthetic to the touch.
    For one, I don't think any of us are experiencing hypesthesia, just phantom vibrations.

    Phantom vibrate seems like a much better term Especially since the vibration often feels like it's coming from the wrong leg, or even my feet on the wrong leg!
  9. #29  
    You may be right, but I often feel "debilitating pain and numbness" while talking to Sprint tech support.....
  10. #30  
    Not only that - try walking into a Sprint store and your whole body starts trembling when they make you wait in line to tell you that the most expensive headset hanging on the wall is the best one too! but maybe that's just here in OK :-/

    Add my name to the list of phantom vibration - we should do a poll ;-)
    He who dies with the most toys is still dead ;-)
  11. #31  
    I believe this happens when your brain produces a slightly higher level of L-Dopamine (a natural form of LSD) for just a moment. You're actually hallucinating for that very moment. It's just like when you swear someone called your name and no one was even there... Or when you swear you heard the phone ring but it really didn't. The human mind is an erie place.
    .
  12. #32  
    Before when I had my Kyocera 6035 (talking about a brick) I always wore it on a belt clip...and it was usually on vibrate. The vibration was a lot like gas passing through my inards. Sometimes I'd go to answer my phone and it was just lunch saying hey.
    pa1mOne Treo600
    Sprint PCS


    Ro|A
    Austin, TX
  13. #33  
    I am just glad that I am not losing my mind, for a while I thought that I must be. Glad to know there are others.

    PS: I carry the Treo in my front left pocket and I always have the vibrate function on. Can't depend on hearing the ringer as I am sure you are all aware.
  14. 7zero's Avatar
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    #34  
    I've been experiencing the same thing for about 10 years, going back to a Motorola pager (always on vibrate...cuz, I hated the noise).

    Just wanted to add my post to those who have been feeling the same phantom vibration.
  15. #35  
    Wow... ditto. I only started feeling it when I began using the Treo600. After about a month of it getting worse I finally switched pockets. The vibrations went away... and none on my other leg, yet.
  16. #36  
    nope nothing here
  17. #37  
    same here !!!
    I think I started feeling these vibrations in my leg before I got my first Treo.
    The sensation is VERY realistic, believe me. Each time it happens I feel scared because it not even stops after realizing it's not true
    I commented this to my friends and some told me they sometimes noticed the same, but I think my sensation was harder and happened more often.
    My conclusion: our brain is simulating this because we are sometimes anxious waiting for an important call or something...

    .. or we are all getting mad for our Treos !!!
    Joan López i Graupera
    Barcelon@ - Catalonia
  18. #38  
    I think this is not a psychological thing. There's some real damage being done. Just my guess. Hope I'm wrong. Some of my friends who have used low-power GSM phones have also reported this phenomenon. (I use a Sprint Treo). Scary to think that we might regret this dream device (and cell phones in general) someday.
  19. #39  
    Sorry to scare everyone. I am a physician. Hope you already have your kids. I do not think that PDA phones have more radiofrequency waves than other phones. The ones I have had are less. I have study showing cell phones causing brain damage in mice.

    See below
    Cooldoc


    Mobiles Phones May Damage Sperm?
    48 minutes ago Add Technology - Reuters to My Yahoo!
    By Patricia Reaney

    LONDON (Reuters) - Mobile phones may damage men's sperm, Hungarian scientists say, in a study that fertility experts dismissed Monday as inconclusive.



    Carrying a mobile in hip pockets or a holster on the waist could cut sperm count by nearly 30 percent, according to the research.


    "The prolonged use of cell phones may have a negative effect on (sperm production) and male fertility," Dr. Imre Fejes, of the department of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Szeged said in a summary of the study.


    Fejes and his team analyzed sperm from 221 men and questioned them about their use of mobile phones. They found correlations between the use of the phones, even in a standby setting, and reduced sperm concentration and quality.


    Fejes said more research is needed to support the findings, which will be reported to this week's conference in Berlin of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology.


    Professor Hans Evers, a past president of the society, said the results are interesting but far from conclusive.


    "It ... appears not to take into account the many potential confounding factors that could have skewed the results," Evers, who works at the Academic Hospital in Maastricht in the Netherlands, said in a statement.


    He added that the study did not seem to analyze stress levels, the type of jobs the men have and whether they smoked, which could all influence sperm count.


    "These factors would have a considerable effect on the outcome of the research," he said.


    Britain's National Radiological Protection Board, which has reviewed research into the health effects of exposure to radiofrequency waves including mobile phones, said, so far, the waves appear to be safe.


    But mobiles phones have been in widespread use for only a short time so more research is needed.


    "This is an unexpected result and we will look at it very carefully but the decline in male fertility has been going on for decades now, before the widespread use of mobile phones, and there can be many reasons for it," Dr. Michael Clark, scientific spokesman for the British board, told Reuters.


    The World Health Organization (news - web sites) has said none of the recent reviews has concluded that exposure to radiofrequency waves from mobile phones or their base stations damages health, but stresses that more studies are needed.
  20. #40  
    comforting, very comforting. i think ill be putting my treo away for a while now, thankyou very much.
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