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  1.    #1  
    SO, The tre600 doesn't have a gps in it - right? Well if this is true, how does the 911 location finding work (the option that I can turn on and off i.e. "911 only" or to broadcast my location constantly) and if I have it turned for broadcasting constantly, what other applications can view it??

    How does it do it if there is no GPS in the phone?

    Kevin
  2. #2  
    That GPS is a false GPS. It uses ping times to towers in it's area to determine where you are. Not very acurate but it could narrow your location down to a house. I know on nokia phones ppl have writen GPS java programs using this idea. It would be nice if we could do this with the Treo and it's Java runtime.
    Iím a lucky man to count on both hands
    The ones I love..

    Visor Pro -> Visor Edge -> Treo 180 -> Treo 270 -> Treo 600 -> Treo 650 -> T|T2+SE T68i -> Treo 600 -> T-Mobile MDA -> Treo 755p -> Treo 800w -> Treo 755p -> PALM PRE -> Palm Pre 2 -> HP Palm Pre 3

    Twittering about
  3. #3  
    Do a search for SnapTrack.


    Thanks,
    Peter
  4. #4  
    I checked snaptrack and didn't see any apps to display lat/long on the Treo 600 (or anything else). I'll keep looking, GPS on my phone will be great when we finally can get it.

    Ed
    http://www.rezonate.com/walkabout/whatsonmytreo600.html
  5. #5  
    Umm, while I don't have it here, I think that manual specifically states that the Treo 600 does have a version of GPS, called A-GPS. I'm not sure the technical details behind how it works other than it can pinpoint you. We'd all be happy GPS owners, but thus far carriers haven't released the necessary software hooks to get to it (somewhat of a similar situation with the Bluetooth drivers). To my knowledge, only phones on the IDEN network (Nextel,SouthernLinc) have released the software hooks to make it work on a subset of Motorola phones. I'm convinced that GPS on the Treo 600 with no hardware modifications could be had, if companies get their act together and address the situation.
    Last edited by bmacfarland; 07/28/2004 at 09:56 PM.
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by bmacfarland
    Umm, while I don't have it here, I think that manual specifically states that the Treo 600 does have a version of GPS, called A-GPS. I'm not sure the technical details behind how it works other than it can pinpoint you. We'd all be happy GPS owners, but thus far carriers haven't released the necessary software hooks to get to it (somewhat of a similar situation with the Bluetooth drivers). To my knowledge, only phones on the IDEN network (Nextel,SouthernLinc) have released the software hooks to make it work on a subset of Motorola phones. I'm convinced that GPS on the Treo 600 with hardware modifications could be had, if companies get their act together and address the situation.
    "How to do everything with your Treo 600" has a special section that states that the Treo has built-in GPS and it's up to Sprint to turn it on.
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by skfny
    "How to do everything with your Treo 600" has a special section that states that the Treo has built-in GPS and it's up to Sprint to turn it on.
    Or whoever your GPS carrier happens to be.
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by bmacfarland
    Umm, while I don't have it here, I think that manual specifically states that the Treo 600 does have a version of GPS, called A-GPS. I'm not sure the technical details behind how it works other than it can pinpoint you. We'd all be happy GPS owners, but thus far carriers haven't released the necessary software hooks to get to it (somewhat of a similar situation with the Bluetooth drivers). To my knowledge, only phones on the IDEN network (Nextel,SouthernLinc) have released the software hooks to make it work on a subset of Motorola phones. I'm convinced that GPS on the Treo 600 with hardware modifications could be had, if companies get their act together and address the situation.
    It does NOT require hardware modifications. On a CDMA phone, if you go to "Phone Preferences" you will find an item labeled "Enable Location Privacy" which can disable the GPS for all but 911 calls. However, A-GPS means [A]ssisted GPS, and the service provider needs to provide the assistance from the network side. The GPS reciever in the phone is a simple single channel GPS which only provides an approximate position solution, and it has to request help from the network to provide an exact solution. One of the reasons for this method of operation is to save battery power on the phone, but the downside is that it only works if the service provider wants it to work.
    Apparently they do not want to support it for anything but 911 calls yet.
  9. #9  
    Yeah, I worded that wrong. I meant "with no hardware modifications could be had." Obviously anything could be had with hardware modifications and the rest of my post stated that there was GPS. I've editted my post so it doesn't seem so silly.
  10. #10  
    Actually, it's the other way around: Triangulation from the towers give the phone a rough estimate of where you are, and then the weak GPS gives it a much more precise location. It would take ~1hr for the weak GPS device to figure out your location by itself.

    However, Sprint still needs to turn this on! I don't want to have to carry around a mouse puck to get GPS ... CONVERGENCE is why we got this phone!


    Thanks,
    Peter
  11. #11  
    It's absolutely rediculous that Sprint hasn't already turned it on. I mean, this technology was in the Treo 300!!! Does anyone have any insight into what the hold-up is?
    A new Avatar to commemorate Silly Season.
  12. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by phandel
    Actually, it's the other way around: Triangulation from the towers give the phone a rough estimate of where you are, and then the weak GPS gives it a much more precise location. It would take ~1hr for the weak GPS device to figure out your location by itself.

    Thanks,
    Peter
    That is sort of correct, since AFLT is used to supplement GPS position solutions, but it's primary use is to provide a solution when the phone has no satellites in view. AFLT also will not work at all when the phone is in a location where there is only one tower in view( no triangle with only one line ). However, the phone's GPS reciever needs assistance from the service provider's Location Server to complete the full set of calculations necessary for a position solution, so the network is always required to provide a position solution. By using the network Location Server, position solutions are provided much faster than by a conventional standalone GPS reciever. But the service provider has to enable it for more than just 911 calls, as is aparently already being done in Japan and Korea.
  13. #13  
    Hrm. I have a GPS, and I like it just the way it is, which is a one-way information street. Having my 600 always on and capable of sending my location information back to somebody without my consent is a little too Big Brother for me. Maybe Sprint realizes this, and is doing it out of legal privacy-issue concerns.

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