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  1.    #1  
    I noticed in another thread some talk about the treo 600 when used with CDMA will send voice calls direct to voicemail when actively using the data portion, whereas with GSM this is not the case.

    Few questions:

    A) Verizon is CDMA or TDMA?
    B) If this is true, this seems to make the CDMA based phones not as valuable - yes the speeds are higher, but what if you're wanting to use the Treo to stream data, or you're on it a good bit data wise? Then most of your calls are going to voicemail? That seems like crap. If hypothetically some of the rumors I've seen about the 610 being EV-DO capable, will that solve this problem? Or will calls still go to voicemail.

    If I plan on spending $500+ for this device, I plan on using the damn thing for what it's worth INCLUDING extensive use of the data. I see SSH, streaming data, email, AIM, on a good bit of the day. I use my regular (nextel) cell a good bit during the day as well and don't want to miss calls if I give it up for Treo.

    Thanks for the insight.. I still need to grasp a good understanding of the differences between CDMA, TDMA, and GSM... I don't like the fact that nextel leaves me without service when vacationing in New hampshire or some other remote location whereas verizon has coverage, or at least verizon phones can ROAM unlike my nextel...

    Kevin
  2. #2  
    As of right now, CDMA and GSM function the same way on the Treo. If you are actively using the connection, meaning loading a webpage, streaming data, checking email, your call will not come in.

    But on both, if you are viewing a webpage that has already loaded, so you are online but not sending or receiving data, your call will come through.

    GSM technology in some phones enables the calls to come in even when you are sending/receiving data, because the data and voice are on different channels (I think that is the reason), but the Treo is not one of those phones.
  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by albertb
    As of right now, CDMA and GSM function the same way on the Treo. If you are actively using the connection, meaning loading a webpage, streaming data, checking email, your call will not come in.

    But on both, if you are viewing a webpage that has already loaded, so you are online but not sending or receiving data, your call will come through.

    GSM technology in some phones enables the calls to come in even when you are sending/receiving data, because the data and voice are on different channels (I think that is the reason), but the Treo is not one of those phones.
    GSM data timeout is much quicker than CDMA, so sometimes it _appears_ as if you were doing data when a call came in. I've tried it on multiple gsm and cdma phones while fetching data and tethered. The GSM phones almost alway s got more calls through (this is not a scientific test by any means), than the cdma ones. However, as you said, if there is active xferring of data going on, I don't think there is a carrier approved/sold gsm phone available today that won't punt you to voicemail.

    EVDO phones - I don't have the full details here on the phone types, but given that EVDO is data only which means that the phone will have at least two signal processing paths, one for data and one for voice, chances are good you can be getting data with no problem while the 1xRTT (voice) will be just fine. Caveat emptor - this is speculation.

    /v
  4.    #4  
    So, if I want to log into a sever via SSH and tail a log file to keep my eye on a server, the entire time i'm doing that I will be sending calls to voicemail? Or do clients like that poll a proxy server which actually maintains the connection thus not keeping a data circuit open continuously?

    When you loose service then come back into service, will you still be connected to the SSHed server?

    Kevin
  5. #5  
    This is interesting. I currently have a T-Mobile Blackberry 7230, but need to get rid of it because the coverage is very bad at my new house and my firm is EOL'ing the Blackberry server internally.

    I'm looking at the Verizon Treo, because I've been a long-time Verizon voice customer and my firm now preferably supports Good. Similar to Kevin's question, can anyone tell me how the data/voice timeout works when you're using a push application such as Good?

    Thanks,
    Greg
  6. sledgie's Avatar
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    #6  
    I haven't used the SSH app yet, but I do use PalmVNC and the IRC client.

    Both work in this way - while you are connected (data being transferred), all voice calls go to voice mail.
    This also means even if you are sitting idly on a server, it still goes to voicemail. It's still sending a small data bit stream - to stay open with the connection.

    If you have a SMS or email or voice mail message - it will alert you.

    once you disconnect - it "hangs up" your connection. i believe this is due more to Palm's OS, then it is the connection. Although, i haven't tried the SSH, i could be wrong. I used to use a SSH client on the blackberry 957 - where i could use other apps and go back and i would still be logged in - but i dont think this is the case with the treo 600. You can't switch in and out of applications (or 98% of applications) and come back to a "saved state" of it. you would need to log back in (which means the connection would be closed or timed out on the server)
    hoped this helps,
    sledgie

    btw tell me what ssh app and i'll try it
    Last edited by sledgie; 07/16/2004 at 12:07 PM.
  7. Minsc's Avatar
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    #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by greg99
    This is interesting. I currently have a T-Mobile Blackberry 7230, but need to get rid of it because the coverage is very bad at my new house and my firm is EOL'ing the Blackberry server internally.

    I'm looking at the Verizon Treo, because I've been a long-time Verizon voice customer and my firm now preferably supports Good. Similar to Kevin's question, can anyone tell me how the data/voice timeout works when you're using a push application such as Good?

    Thanks,
    Greg
    I hate to speak out of turn since I've never used Good, but I would imagine it's no different than anything else - you can be connected to Good all day long, and as long as you're not actively uploading/downloading data your calls will come in. The only time you would be uploading/downloading data is if you get a new email for instance, which causes the Good server to "push" a sync command to your Treo. Your Treo would then sync, which probably takes 10-15 seconds or so, during which time you couldn't receive a call.

    I have a Sprint Treo, and I will say that in actual practice, I've missed very few calls due as a result of the data connection. I'm connected almost all day using Seven to get my work email pushed to me. I certainly don't get as much email as some people do, but I get quite a bit. (maybe 30 emails per day) On any given week I miss maybe 1 - 2 calls, if any.
  8. #8  
    Folks,

    Perhaps I can clarify a few points here...

    1) The CDMA Treo has a single radio that can either do voice or data. It keeps a connection active (arrows green) for about 15 seconds after the last data is transferred (this is called a dormant connection). This is when the arrows turn grey. If the arrows are green, the call goes to voicemail.

    2) GSM Treo's send packets over voice like channels and will only miss calls the instant the radio is sending a packet. So theoretically, more calls with come through on a GSM Treo.

    3) Certain apps like Sprint Business Connection (a push e-mail system from www.seven.com) and others use SMS for notification of new e-mail, and then require a data connection (sometimes) to fetch the e-mail. The SMS messages will not interfere with receiving calls, however if the apps connect via a data connection to receive the full e-mail or synchronize, the same rules above apply. The CDMA unit will keep the connection active and block calls for about 15 seconds after the last data is sent, while the GSM models will only block calls exactly when packets are being sent.

    Hope this helps...

    Glenn
  9. #9  
    I agree with it all.
    What I am curious about is, why can SMS be sentand received while we are using CDMA voice calls? SMS is data as well, is it sent a different way? If SMS can be sent and received why can't a website's data be sent and received in the same manner?
  10. #10  
    Albertb,

    I believe that SMS messages are sent over the "paging channel" and don't require a connection. This is why they are limited in length.

    Someone who is better at cellular radio can probably add more info, but as far as I know, all cellular/PCS systems have a few thing in common (going back to analog)

    1) There is a "paging" channel that is used to broadcast new calls, etc. The cellular radio listens to this all the time. SMS is sent over this.

    2) The rest of the spectrum is used for calls / data connections / etc., and allocated once a call or data session is initiated. Once a call is placed or received on the paging channel, it is allocated a channel (TDMA/GSM/GPRS) or a code (CDMA) to use to place the call.

    At this time, CDMA (Sprint & Verizon) uses spread spectrum technology to send data (voice or data) using channels across the entire spectrum licensed by the carrier. When no spectrum is needed, none is used (but the radio stays on).

    On GSM, individual channels are used for voice and data no matter what needs to be sent. It wastes more bandwidth but since the radio only monitors certain frequencies, but you can get better handset battery life.

    Glenn

    Quote Originally Posted by albertb
    I agree with it all.
    What I am curious about is, why can SMS be sentand received while we are using CDMA voice calls? SMS is data as well, is it sent a different way? If SMS can be sent and received why can't a website's data be sent and received in the same manner?

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