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  1.    #1  
    Hey folks.
    My search of posts revealed no recent discussions of this topic.
    I'm wondering what the implications of using my Treo 600 to replace my DSL connection at home would be? It's mostly information surfing (i.e., Yahoo, Google, airfares, email, etc.) that I'm doing. No online gaming or anything. I kinda thought that since you can emulate the Treo screen on a pc monitor and control it with a fullsize keyboard, I might eliminate the second internet connection.
    Any thoughts are appreciated!
    Thanks for reading!
  2. #2  
    in my opinion that would be a bad choice. Having the dedicated dsl line does more than just gaming. Your speed is better (especially if you have family using the dsl and you networked) Processing power on you pc would also be better than your 144mhz treo. I have dsl and I plan to get wireless too. I know it seems like an added cost but in the end, it just makes more sense. Can you download, talk on the phone, and run spreadsheets at the same time on your treo?

    Give it time, I guarantee that the wireless access and dsl with merge in to the same package. That's the way the business is going.
  3. ls3mach's Avatar
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    #3  
    I think he means, connecting the PC to his Treo. If you are a minimal internet user, I could see doing that. I am an internet junkie however, so this would not work for me. The speed at which your phone connects at is 145kbps. While this is not DSL speeds, I found it acceptable for casual surfing. Unacceptable for audio or video however.
  4. #4  
    dsl or a treo dsl anyday
    Nokia 3210 > Nokia 3310 >Palm Vx > Palm M105 >Treo 180g and Nokia 8850 > Treo 270 > Treo 600 > Sony TH55 > Tapwave Zodiac 2 > Treo 650 GSM > Imate KJam > Treo 750v

    Formerly Known As PRANKSTAR
  5. #5  
    I wouldn't say the Treo can replace DSL, but it could reasonably replace a dial-up ISP. The bandwidth using a wireless network is similar to dial-up. I use my Treo as a backup to connect my PC to the internet when my cable modem goes down. I don't have a landline so I can't use dial-up.
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by methos65
    I kinda thought that since you can emulate the Treo screen on a pc monitor and control it with a fullsize keyboard, I might eliminate the second internet connection.
    Any thoughts are appreciated!
    Thanks for reading!
    This isnt even neccessary. With the software PDAnet, you would actually be using your PC with full internet browser etc... The Treo would simply be a "modem" to the internet. Depending on your service provider it might be a solution for occasional use. Sprint seems to connect at around 90k to 95k which is almost twice as fast a dial up. The rest as far as I can tell are MUCH slower. So it depends on your need for speed.

    When the cell phone providers launch the new networks (I think its EVDO) I believe the speeds are supposed to be 2meg or something like that. When that happens (asssuming they dont figure out a way to Block PDAnet) I will definately drop my High Speed provider.
  7. #7  
    my thoughts exactly!
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by sxtg
    When the cell phone providers launch the new networks (I think its EVDO) I believe the speeds are supposed to be 2meg or something like that. When that happens (asssuming they dont figure out a way to Block PDAnet) I will definately drop my High Speed provider.
    And there's the very reason we'll never see a good bluetooth phone from Sprint, and they'll continue to try to choke laptop users with their phones. Not even EVDO has been engineered to be a replacement for dsl or cable. It will give you a much better PHONE browsing and web experience, but gobbling up bandwidth for downloads and Kazaa will just kill the golden goose. I would love to be able to use it for light browsing, but I'm afraid bandwidth hogs will result in blocking PDAnet.
    Remember, the "P" in PDA stands for personal.
    If it works for you, it is "P"erfect.
  9.    #9  
    Many thanks to all. Definitely food for thought!!
    Happy Treo-ing!
  10. #10  
    I will second dstrauss on this... don't be stupid with Sprint by having PDANet on all the time or they will can your account. Their subscriber agreement specifically allows them to this if they detect misuse of data services which they can. Moreover, it can cause Sprint to change their policy and agreement which will screw us all up. Be discreet, use it for 30=1hr minute bursts when needed, don't mess up a good thing.
  11. #11  
    Is there an equivalent of PDAnet available for Mac users? All I see is PC software on their site.
  12. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by eclipse
    I will second dstrauss on this...
    Thirded.

    You can connected a desktop or laptop computer to the Internet with either PDANet or Wireless Modem. However, too much usage will result in huge bill from your carrier and, quite likely, get your service cancelled entirely.
  13. #13  
    When I first moved into my apartment all I had for a phone was my Treo 300. I had read some about PDANet and the fast connection speeds. I tested it all out and it worked very well, much faster than dialup could ever be. I ended up using my Treo 300 then Treo 600 for my stand alone internet connection for 6 months. I am a pretty heavy internet user, though I did my major downloads at my parents place on DSL and burned them to CD. Now I host my own server stuff so I had to get DSL, but if you are just going to do surfing and chatting, the Treo as your main connection works quite well (with sprint, I dont know about gsm). One major downfall is that you'll get knocked off the internet when you get a phone call, however the phone wont ring, you'll just be left with a hanging internet connection. Give it a shot.
  14. #14  
    I think I said this in another thread before, but last Christmas I went home for a couple weeks with my PDAnet demo on my T600 so I could run updates after installing Windows XP on the family computer. In a period of about one week I downloaded about 1.5gb of updates, drivers, music (Kazaa), and other crap. No problem. No complaints.

    It is difficult to see the 144kbps bandwidth because the connection has a high degree of latency. This means any one dowload is going to be relatively slow because of the time it takes for response packets to make it from one end to the other. However, if you employ a download accelerator such as LeechGet and start 10 downloads of the same file, you WILL see the full speed of the connection. You can also partially overcome the lag in Internet Explorer by using the multiple download hack. (I will dig it up if anyone wants it.) It tells your IE how many files to download simultaneously. The default (part of the HTTP standard) is 2.

    I hope that last little paragraph was enlightening. If I knew anything about the insides of PalmOS I would try to write an internet accelerator that would compensate for the latency problem.

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