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  1.    #1  
    HAVING HAD MY T600 SINCE IT 1ST CAME OUT, I THINK IT IS WELL WORTH IT, BUT HERE IS A VIEW FROM A NY TIEMS REPORTER, TAKE CARE, JAY

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    May 4, 2004
    Geeks Gawk, But Will Her Life Be Transformed?
    By AMY HARMON, NY Times

    I HAD been jealous of my friend Jenny's Treo 600 for quite some time.

    Not that she flaunted it. Like most owners of the hottest all-in-one wireless device, she was too busy for that. Too busy making calls, sending e-mail messages, snapping pictures and cruising the Web on her sleek hand-held gadget to be aware that she was inspiring such geek envy. Or was she?

    In any case, I wanted one. I had been the first on my block with e-mail, broadband Internet access and Wi-Fi at home. I worried that I was falling behind on the mobile wireless frontier. So when the assignment came to write about the technorati's lust-object du jour, and whether going more wildly wireless truly would Change My Life I ran right out to buy one.

    That was where I hit my first snag. There was, it seemed, nowhere to buy one in all of New York City. I tried the Web, where certain sites were offering the $600 device for the great bargain of $800 plus shipping.

    It took me a while to get over the sticker shock. Some wireless companies offer discounts of up to $150, but you have to agree to an often-usurious or long-term service contract to get it. Coolness, it seemed, would be costly. I put myself on the four-to-six-week wait list at www.handspring.com, the Web site of Treo's manufacturer, but I made sure I could withdraw before they charged my credit card.

    And the expense for the flashy hardware was not all. After a frustrating discussion with AT&T Wireless, I learned that I would need to pay $29.95 a month for voice and $29.95 a month for data in order to make full use of my Treo. No matter that the fancy wireless digital network would turn voice and data into indistinguishable ones and zeros. There was no combo package and the shortest contract was for one year. If I wanted to cancel after a 30-day trial, I would have to pay a $175 fee.

    I discussed it with Jenny.

    She said it was worth it.

    I left my name on the list.

    Never had I wanted a Treo more than the week before I got it, as I wandered around the Lower East Side, trying to find the birthday party I was supposed to attend. The invitation had come by Evite, the online invitation service, and I had not written down the address. Cellphone calls to fellow-invitees yielded no answer. If only I could log onto Evite.com right then and there!

    A few days later, my Treo and I started our mobile adventures. Undaunted by the instruction manual whose chapter headings ("first day," "first week" "first two weeks" and "first month") implied a rather long learning curve, I fired off some e-mail messages. Then I called my voice mail about 20 times, just so I could press my fingertips against the touch-screen number pad, an inexplicably more pleasant tactile sensation than pushing buttons on a typical phone.

    More important, I immediately reaped the benefits in the geek cred department. Colleagues spotted it on my desk and exclaimed over it, and, by extension, me.

    "I'm in the subway!" I typed to everyone I could think of, knowing that my underground e-mail messages would be automatically propelled through the ether as soon as I emerged. At least a few people responded with the appropriate blend of jealous admiration.

    It was in the subway, too, that I first began to notice the competition. As soon became apparent, a hallmark of the wireless mentality is a compulsion to respond to any device's display by flashing your own. As soon as I pulled out my Treo on the subway, it suddenly seemed as if the entire car had been waiting until just that moment to check electronic calendars, play their Game Boys or, in some cases I found hard to believe, make cellphone calls.

    We eyed each other with the barest hint of camaraderie, and a healthy dose of rivalry. But we all knew there was a pecking order, and I was serene in the knowledge that I was at the top.

    Until I saw the new Blackberry 7700 hand-held, which unsettled me slightly. It has a phone, it has Internet access and it has bigger keys on its lettered keyboard than the Treo's. The keyboard was my major gripe with the Treo. No question that it is better than the tiresome process of SMS messaging on a normal phone (press the "2" key once for "A," twice for "B" and three times for "C"). But the Treo buttons are too little, and too hard to press.

    More fun was the Web feature, which I used to visit MapQuest at a crucial moment in my apartment search, as I was trying to find my way by car from Washington Heights to Prospect Heights (I was not driving). Then I switched to phone mode to let a friend know where we were headed. Later, I snapped a picture of an overpriced apartment with the Treo's digital camera, after which I headed to the gym, where I listened to the audio book version of "Pompeii: A Novel" that I had downloaded to the Treo.

    And I had not even advanced to the Treo trick level of a master like Jenny, who uses it to run real-time Google searches on people she meets in bars, or the people who use the device to record video.

    Some people will argue that there is no substitute for a pure, teeny-tiny cellphone, and I can see their point. However, in one particularly satisfying moment, I placed the Treo on a table and piled up next to it the mass of electronic equipment whose functions it combined: a laptop, a digital camera, an MP3 player, a cellphone and an ancient Palm Pilot. I lifted up the pile. It was heavy. I felt lighter.

    But the major difference between carrying assorted single-purpose gadgets or not having them and the Treo has to do with your concentration. That is, the Treo tends to absorb more of it. It's like finding a way to make stealth phone calls that are not as noisy but may be just as rude.

    I would never have talked on my cellphone in the plush quiet of the Torneau store at Columbus Circle as I waited for my watchband to be fixed, for instance. But with my Treo, I was deeply involved in a Web search for schools in Jackson Heights when the salesman came back with a form for me to fill out. It was hard to put the Treo down. He gave me kind of a dirty look.

    In my Treo-focused subway rides, was I missing out on the people-watching I used to enjoy? As I stood on street corners waiting for realtors, should I have been taking in the neighborhood vibe, rather than tapping on my touch screen? Perhaps. But I was, of course, still in my first month of Treo education. Did I need the Treo? No. Was it too expensive? Yes. But it was fun. I wonder what Jenny will get next.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  2. #2  
    Cool article! Tx...
    _________________
    aka Gfunkmagic

    Current device: Palm Pre
    Device graveyard: Palm Vx, Cassiopeia E100, LG Phenom HPC, Palm M515, Treo 300, Treo 600, Treo 650, Treo 700p, Axim X50v, Treo 800w



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  3. #3  
    I'll hang this next to the original 'Treo rules with bright screen and long battery life' article (by Walter Mossberg) at my office.
  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by skfny
    I'll hang this next to the original 'Treo rules with bright screen and long battery life' article (by Walter Mossberg) at my office.
    Oh, is that the TREO 180 Mossberg review?
  5. #5  
    Excellent article. One thing that it didn't take into account is that some of use didn't pay that amount for their Treo. Using the Handspring upgrade, service credit for signing a new contract, and selling my Treo 300 on ebay, I think I ended up paying less than $50. My data plan is $10 a month grandfathered from before.

    He also annoying didn't mention that you can get it for different carriers (Sprint was cheaper for me). Worse, he pointed out the difference between data and voice plans which is pretty standard fair, and not Treo-centric. I could forgive that, because he might have been just trying to point out all data plans are extra for any phone. What I can't forgive is that he mentioned the early cancellation fee? There are very, very few cellphone plans you can get without that fee (or else you just have to pay a higher rate). Who doesn't know about this already?
  6.    #6  
    hi, BCMAC..it is ha she not a he that wrote the sotry. Seldom, is it possible just one for you to have some thing nice to say???

    SKFNY where in Flushing., I lived therew for 38 years moved 10 years ago, just seling house up there as we "speak", Near Parsons and Jewel ave.

    Take care, Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  7. #7  
    My gripes about this "Wireless Living- A Special Section."

    1. Old news written by people who are just finding out. Sparse coverage--even the first page is mostly just the one graphic.

    2. I have no problems with the Treo's keyboard and I even type with one thumb.

    3. Notice no ads for the Treo.

    Bottom line: The Times can't compete with the Web.

    OT: I returned the Clie TH55. I'm spoiled by the one-hand convenience of the 600. It has a "better" camera, but too cumbersome to use. I've given up on the Wi-Fi handhelds. I'll wait for the SD card for the Treo.
    <a href="http://billkosloskymd.typepad.com/wirelessdoc/">Wireless Doc the blog</a>
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by ilovedessert
    Seldom, is it possible just one for you to have some thing nice to say???
    No need to reply.

    SKFNY where in Flushing., I lived therew for 38 years moved 10 years ago, just seling house up there as we "speak", Near Parsons and Jewel ave.

    Take care, Jay
    Further down the block from you, near Parsons and Franklin.
  9. #9  
    Jenny will get the 610 next?

    Can the Treo/Blazer do EVITE?


    Still havent seen another treo on the subway. I work In Washington Heights, so I probably pass her when I go to work.
    Felipe
    On the road to 5,000 posts
    Life is what happens between Firmware releases.
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by Felipe
    Still havent seen another treo on the subway. I work In Washington Heights, so I probably pass her when I go to work.
    It's funny too, because I have been surprised at the number of people I've seen with a Treo 600 on the subway (4/5 lines). Maybe a dozen or so.

    In the year since I purchased my 7135, I've seen maybe three or four at the max with a 7135.
  11. #11  
    quite entertaining
    Truth is good, knowledge is power and it's the second mouse who gets the cheese
  12. #12  
    good review... This review was not written by a super-geek, like a lot of us are. Most people see the treo as a phone, and don't realize it needs a data plan as well. What she did was write about the facts of owning a cell phone in general, as they apply to treo ownership. New contract with cancellation fee, yep, expensive, hard to get phone, yep, small buttons, yep (I'm used to mine, but still hit the wrong one every once in awhile)... Old news, well, I dunno... Old news to uber geeks, but still the best cellphone on the market, and that's kinda new news to most people.
  13. #13  
    This section is more a style section, but anyone trying out something they know absolutely nothing about ("I had but one question. What's wireless?), are bound to pass along misinformation. Users don't write this way on the Web.

    The Treo 600's fame is traveling mostly by word of mouth (or browsing), because Sprint's not advertising it to a great extent in the major media. Why? In this section, Verizon has a full page ad prominently featuring the Blackberry.

    There's a good interview of Walt Mossberg on Wired mag Web site. It's funny, he's able to reach more people than just geeks (and gets +$500,000/yr.) Time mag tried to hire him away from the WSJ for their "geeky" publication.

    I have but one question. Who wants to read stuff like this?
    <a href="http://billkosloskymd.typepad.com/wirelessdoc/">Wireless Doc the blog</a>
  14. #14  
    pretty much the only time I see anything from Sprint, re the 600, is when the pic of the 600 is in their ads touting their data network speed, and how Sprint is one company now rather than two - both ads being specifically targeted against AT&T Wireless. And the 600 is really just there for eye candy - nothing much about it.
  15. #15  
    It might be related to palmOne not being able to meet demand, but why do I have the feeling that once Verizon carries the T6, they'll do a better job at marketing?

    I think that by Q3, we'll see a lot of smartphones with built-in keyboards that don't offer a better design than the T6. In which case, the T6 will rise to the top.
    <a href="http://billkosloskymd.typepad.com/wirelessdoc/">Wireless Doc the blog</a>

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