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  1.    #1  
  2. #2  
    tempted, but still now low enuf. maybe at $200.
    Felipe
    On the road to 5,000 posts
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  3. #3  
  4. #4  
    Holy camoly! Do you guys think a 2.0GB SD card is gonna be released?

    Stan
    550.5.7.1
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  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by Stanward
    Holy camoly! Do you guys think a 2.0GB SD card is gonna be released?

    Stan
    Yes. They are planning up to 5gig at this point but that probably wont be till mid next year.

    Buy.com has great prices but they don't seem to have the 1 giger yet

    Jim
  6. #6  
    wow - I've thought about that size for a whlie, but seeing the ad and the whole thing makes it that much more real, and thus even more tempting. It would sure be nice to combine my current 4 256 cards into one, but.....eek. $260 or whatever. Tough.
  7. #7  
    You know, it seems as if I used to have to store data on single-sided, single-density 5.25" diskettes with a capacity of 92 kB each. Sometimes a disk started to get a little crowded, and I had to get another one.

    A 1 GB card would hold about as much as maybe a footlocker full of those suckers. It makes me wonder whether I really need to keep all of these data on a device the size of a postage stamp. Or whether I actually need to keep it at all.

    On the other hand, I once had a job programming a room-size mainframe computer that had a RAM of 4 K and no electronic mass storage -- I think my Timex watch is a more powerful computer than that.

    (If these old-timer musings are boring to you, just remember that nostalgia today just isn't what it used to be.)
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by nrosser
    wow - I've thought about that size for a whlie, but seeing the ad and the whole thing makes it that much more real, and thus even more tempting. It would sure be nice to combine my current 4 256 cards into one, but.....eek. $260 or whatever. Tough.
    You have to keep in mind that if the 1GB card corrupts, that is a lot of data that is going down the tube. I think 2 x 512 is a better idea. It will cost more but I think it is a safer bet. I am waiting for Panasonic to ship more 512MB to the retail stores here.
  9. #9  
    I would say with the 1 giger you'd better have a SD card reader. Then just back it all up to the PC. Luckily my toshiba has a slot built in! Yippie!
    Now I just have to wait for the price to come down a few bucks.

    Jim
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by redcap
    You have to keep in mind that if the 1GB card corrupts, that is a lot of data that is going down the tube. I think 2 x 512 is a better idea. It will cost more but I think it is a safer bet. I am waiting for Panasonic to ship more 512MB to the retail stores here.
    3 x 1.0gb is a better idea still

    Don't you backup your data to your PC each night?
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by Cyril
    3 x 1.0gb is a better idea still

    Don't you backup your data to your PC each night?
    Isn't 3.0 GB of data storage kinda extreme? For the price, wouldn't getting another Treo 600 unit is better?

    I sync my data to my laptop each day but not my SD card. I also have Backupman backup at 3am each morning onto a Panasonic 256MB. I have been reading on the boards that sync-ing your data via PC doesn't backup every single piece of data on your Treo.

    Do you backup your SD cards on a daily basis? If so, what software do you use? I use a multi SD/MM/Smart/Memory PCMCIA card for my laptop and able to see the files from my SD card. I just copy and paste the all the folders and files to my laptop. I am able to drop (ie: standard copy and paste feature of Windows) MP3 files to the correct directory on the SD and ptunes plays them perfectly. Has anyone able to perform this on their entire SD card?

    Still waiting for the Panasonic 512MB to arrive. They are currently on back order from Panasonic Canada.
  12. #12  
    I use BackupBuddy to backup my T6 and SD card. It backs up every file when you HotSync automatically. And it's very customizable and only backs up files that have changed. I've been using it since back when I had a Visor Dlx. It's saved me many times.
    AT&T Wireless sucked so I left!! 2,370,000 ATTWS customers left in Q1 (2004) and I'm proud to be one of them!
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  13.    #13  
    I bought a Lexar JumpDrive Trio to transfer filetypes the install tool won't handle and large files like MP3s & MPGs to and from my SD card.

    Additionally, it takes Memory Sticks, MMC or SD cards and plugs into any USB port. I'd been using a TrekStor ThumbDrive which is not upgradeable memory wise. This has much greater flexibility to use my SD cards and Memory Sticks where ever.


    Quote Originally Posted by JimHoboken
    I would say with the 1 giger you'd better have a SD card reader. Then just back it all up to the PC. Luckily my toshiba has a slot built in! Yippie!
    Now I just have to wait for the price to come down a few bucks.

    Jim
  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by Dr J
    You know, it seems as if I used to have to store data on single-sided, single-density 5.25" diskettes with a capacity of 92 kB each. Sometimes a disk started to get a little crowded, and I had to get another one.

    A 1 GB card would hold about as much as maybe a footlocker full of those suckers. It makes me wonder whether I really need to keep all of these data on a device the size of a postage stamp. Or whether I actually need to keep it at all.

    On the other hand, I once had a job programming a room-size mainframe computer that had a RAM of 4 K and no electronic mass storage -- I think my Timex watch is a more powerful computer than that.

    (If these old-timer musings are boring to you, just remember that nostalgia today just isn't what it used to be.)
    Not at all
    I have access to a Data General Nova 4 phone booth sized job with a 10 meg hard disk (about a 2 foot cube of aluminum) and a 8 inch floppy and something like 64 or 256 k of ram, a 110 or 300 baud tty and a few "glass tty's"
    And about a 6 foot long shelf of 3-ring binders of shematics and programming manuals.
    When it was in service, a couple guys from DG would come out once a month and replace worn belts, cooked servos, re-seat connectors and chips, even adjust pots and variable caps to keep circuits in tune. It was factory overhauled from top to bottom under the last days of it's warranty and then shut off very shortly after so although it is really old and it hasn't been fired up in years, it's also practically brand new. I booted it up once about 5 years ago out of curiosity and it hadn't been powered up for at least 5 years before that, But I do remember it when it was in active daily production use in my uncles electric motor repair shop when I was little. I think when I get out of my appartment and into a house I'll probably go collect that thing and make it into a shrine in the cellar or computer room, or perhaps a feature of actual living space decore. It has a really cool look like the 60's idea of futuristic.

    But that's fancy new fangled stuff. The real fun was my dad's job maintaining a room full of computer (singular) in a paper mill for a computer company called Accuray. That one had as you put it, no electronic mass storage. But I still feel like I missed out on the really cool stuff because that one had nice neat tidy convenient compact efficient spools of punched paper tape that fed right in to the tty. Much better than the earlier punched cards.

    By contrast, a co-worker who happens to be the original author of an old 4gl called filePro tells me stories of working on machines that used something called card access memory, which consisted of a long sort of hanging conveyor belt slash monorail kind of thing (like the thing laundries have that has all the cloths hanging from it and it moves like a train) with a zillion paper puch cards hanging from it zipping back and forth and the cards would always wear out and jam up and fall off etc...
    He told me about some other pretty wacky contraptions too, things that you wouldn't think anyone would ever actually think of building and ever expect it to work for 1 minute. Not only did they build them, but spent millions doing it, in 1960's dollars, and banks and governments and such actually used them to do real important work. Amazing. And programmers developed these bizarre tricks that took advantage of the various quirks these various chunks of hardware exhibited to attain results that they had no business acheiving given the supposed computing power available.

    By contrast, it's pretty boring out there today. It's always more and faster, but never interesting.
    Last edited by KEYofR; 05/10/2004 at 11:43 PM.
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  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by KEYofR
    By contrast, it's pretty boring out there today. It's always more and faster, but never interesting.
    I repectfully disagree
    We are holding phones with a camera, keyboard, 1 gig capacity (currently), internet browsing and potential worldwide usability...

    that my friend, is interesting...

    Jim
  16. #16  
    hmm
    point!
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