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  1.    #1  
    Has anyone considered this option? I found myself in need of a Wifi connection yesterday, and used my PC as a sniffer (windows XP allows you to "look" for available wireless networks, and I actually found one in a hotel lobby (only to learn I needed a user name and passcode, and could buy one days access for ten bucks), but have heard of companys considering watches and keychains that will light "green" in the prescense of a viable wifi connection. I just thought it would be cool to use my 600 as a sniffer, so I wouldnt have to boot up the laptop and wave it around while wandering around in search of a signal. Are any of you tech savvy code gurus interested? It would be a cool bit of software to add, dont you think?

    Jeff
    Jeff
  2. #2  
    Originally posted by Snowracer
    Has anyone considered this option? I found myself in need of a Wifi connection yesterday, and used my PC as a sniffer (windows XP allows you to "look" for available wireless networks, and I actually found one in a hotel lobby (only to learn I needed a user name and passcode, and could buy one days access for ten bucks), but have heard of companys considering watches and keychains that will light "green" in the prescense of a viable wifi connection. I just thought it would be cool to use my 600 as a sniffer, so I wouldnt have to boot up the laptop and wave it around while wandering around in search of a signal. Are any of you tech savvy code gurus interested? It would be a cool bit of software to add, dont you think?

    Jeff
    You're looking at a hardware issue, unless you're considering the use an SD 802.11 card.

    GSM:
    Initially developed for operation in the 900MHz band and subsequently modified for the 850, 1800 and 1900MHz bands

    CDMA:
    Multi-Carrier (cdma2000 1xMC and HDR in 1.25 MHz bandwidth), and 3xMC in 5 MHz bandwidth) and Direct Spread (WCDMA in 5 MHz bandwidth).

    Wifi (802.11b):
    2,400 - 2,483.5 MHz
  3.    #3  
    Would you just purchase a card for the slot on the phone? To act as a sniffer wouldnt it need software? Sorry for my ignorance, I just thought it would be great to activate a program on the 600, that would tell me that I had a good wifi signal.
    Jeff
  4. #4  
    if you have an external wifi card (sdio) you can pick up a program called netstumbler that works great at picking up on the presence of wireless traffic.
    "The danger from computers is not that they will eventually get as smart as men, but that we will agree to meet them halfway." -Bernard Avishai
    "Computers are a lot like air conditioners - they both work great until you open windows." -Anonymous

  5. #5  
    sandisk makes a sd wifi card but has not released the palm drivers for it

    http://www.bargainpda.com/default.asp?newsID=1861
  6.    #6  
    Originally posted by jaytee
    sandisk makes a sd wifi card but has not released the palm drivers for it

    http://www.bargainpda.com/default.asp?newsID=1861
    Thank-you for this information
    Jeff
  7. #7  
    As far as I know, the Treo 600 does not supply the SDIO with enough power to run a WiFi card, so even when they do have the drivers, it won't work. Look around, maybe it's changed since I last saw it, but I doubt it. So there's really no way to check for a signal.
  8. #8  
    Originally posted by TrickerZ
    As far as I know, since I last saw it, but I doubt it.
    So that's what you think, huh?

    The question of whether there will ever be a Wi-Fi SDIO card for the Treo is still up in the air. The "not enough power" rumor was paralleled with a "nah, we're gonna give it a try" rumor. Common denominator? Rumor.

    Wi-Fi remains a "wait and see" concept. At the moment, there is none.

    If you were really serious about this idea, you could get one of the SD Wi-fi cards that currently exists (with only Pocket PC drivers) and hack up software that would allow the Treo to use the radio simply to detect Wi-Fi (as opposed to broadcast on that frequency).

    Or you could pick up one of those keychain sensor dealies -- they're running from $15 to free right now.
  9.    #9  
    Originally posted by snerdy

    So that's what you think, huh?

    The question of whether there will ever be a Wi-Fi SDIO card for the Treo is still up in the air. The "not enough power" rumor was paralleled with a "nah, we're gonna give it a try" rumor. Common denominator? Rumor.

    Wi-Fi remains a "wait and see" concept. At the moment, there is none.

    If you were really serious about this idea, you could get one of the SD Wi-fi cards that currently exists (with only Pocket PC drivers) and hack up software that would allow the Treo to use the radio simply to detect Wi-Fi (as opposed to broadcast on that frequency).

    Or you could pick up one of those keychain sensor dealies -- they're running from $15 to free right now.
    a much more affordable option to boot! Thanks Snerdy
    Jeff
  10.    #10  
    Originally posted by snerdy

    So that's what you think, huh?

    The question of whether there will ever be a Wi-Fi SDIO card for the Treo is still up in the air. The "not enough power" rumor was paralleled with a "nah, we're gonna give it a try" rumor. Common denominator? Rumor.

    Wi-Fi remains a "wait and see" concept. At the moment, there is none.

    If you were really serious about this idea, you could get one of the SD Wi-fi cards that currently exists (with only Pocket PC drivers) and hack up software that would allow the Treo to use the radio simply to detect Wi-Fi (as opposed to broadcast on that frequency).

    Or you could pick up one of those keychain sensor dealies -- they're running from $15 to free right now.
    By the way, where can you get these gadgets?
    Jeff
  11.    #11  
    quoted from:

    http://reiter.weblogger.com/2003/01/28

    WiFi Sniffer: More information


    A few weeks ago a number of Webloggers posted information about a credit card sized WiFi sniffer from idetect in Singapore. The WFS-1, as it's named, is a very simple device that searches for WiFi signals when you push a button.

    It has a green LED to signify on/off and three red LEDs that designate the strength of the signal. The sniffer runs on two 1.5 volt button cells.

    That was about all the information available from the Weblog postings and on the company's Web site, so I sent an e-mail to get a few more details.

    A bit more info.

    It operates between 2.4 GHz and 2.485 GHz, measures 8.6 cm x 5.4 cm x 1 cm and has a sensitivity of 0.2 uW/cm2.

    The WiFi sniffer is slated to be available in April for $20 - $25. The company is talking to distributors now. I asked about the possibility of enabling the sniffer to be turned on -- and remain on -- but that would, as I assumed, drain the battery too quickly.

    Personally, I'd be interested in the product, rather than checking for a signal by turning on my laptop computer or my Compaq IPAQ -- especially the IPAQ since a WiFi compact flash card draws power at an alarming rate.
    Jeff
  12. #12  
    from my knowledge those cheap "sniffers" just alert you to the presence of a particular waveform. i.e. a ~2.4ghz for wifi signals.

    it won't tell you if it's an access point, a transmitter, or an industrial microwave dish; it also won't tell you if it's a public or a private AP. I'm pretty leary about them due to the limited amount of data they really back to the user. . . .yes or no.

    they sound like they have some potential, but I think that it has quite the potential to pick up more false readings than anything else.
    "The danger from computers is not that they will eventually get as smart as men, but that we will agree to meet them halfway." -Bernard Avishai
    "Computers are a lot like air conditioners - they both work great until you open windows." -Anonymous

  13. #13  
    Originally posted by Tekara
    from my knowledge those cheap "sniffers" just alert you to the presence of a particular waveform. i.e. a ~2.4ghz for wifi signals.

    it won't tell you if it's an access point, a transmitter, or an industrial microwave dish; it also won't tell you if it's a public or a private AP. I'm pretty leary about them due to the limited amount of data they really back to the user. . . .yes or no.

    they sound like they have some potential, but I think that it has quite the potential to pick up more false readings than anything else.
    And if you are correct, it would pick up quite a few cordless phones too. Almost everyone has a 2.4ghz cordless phone these days. Could be why they sell them so cheap. Would anyone care to describe how they work? Do they monitor the type of data on the band or just see if the band is there?
  14. #14  
    http://www.kensington.com/html/3720.html

    Here it is, you can get them at CompUSA among other places. Here's some info from that page:

    "Detects 802.11b and most 802.11b/g signals from up to 200 feet away

    Filters out other wireless signals, including cordless phones, microwave ovens and Bluetooth networks"

    So there you go.
  15. #15  
    What I am interested in, however, is what it uses for a disctinction between the sources. . . . the 15$ pricetag tells me it's not using any "intelligent" processing to determine the nature of the signal.
    "The danger from computers is not that they will eventually get as smart as men, but that we will agree to meet them halfway." -Bernard Avishai
    "Computers are a lot like air conditioners - they both work great until you open windows." -Anonymous

  16. #16  
    Hey Gang,

    For folks who didn't catch this story, it looks like the chipmaker behind the first SD WiFi card has adapted the chips to use less power and work with the existing Treo 600s. So now we wait for SanDisk to integrate them and get the driver issue settled.
    http://www.palminfocenter.com/view_story.asp?ID=6428

    Hopefully it is just a matter of months now.

    ~O

    P.S. For those looking for a sniffer card:
    http://www.ecost.com/ecost/shop/detail.asp?dpno=241768
  17. #17  
    A short review of the Kensignton wifi finder on the well-respected gadgeteer site. Sounds like it doesn't live up to its promises.
  18. #18  
    Originally posted by oyinbo
    Hey Gang,

    For folks who didn't catch this story, it looks like the chipmaker behind the first SD WiFi card has adapted the chips to use less power and work with the existing Treo 600s. So now we wait for SanDisk to integrate them and get the driver issue settled.
    http://www.palminfocenter.com/view_story.asp?ID=6428

    Hopefully it is just a matter of months now.

    ~O

    P.S. For those looking for a sniffer card:
    http://www.ecost.com/ecost/shop/detail.asp?dpno=241768
    hopefully that doesn't mean it only works for like 15ft from the AP. That would be a pretty crappy tradeoff.

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