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  1.    #1  
    Would someone be able to let me know the difference betweena SD and MMC card. One is secure digital and the other MultiMedia card but other than that what is the difference?
  2. #2  
    From Whatis.com:

    A MultiMediaCard (MMC) is a tiny memory card that uses flash memory to make storage portable among various devices, such as car navigation systems, cellular phones, eBooks, PDAs, smartphones, and digital cameras, music players, and video camcorders, and personal computers. MMC was jointly developed by SanDisk and Siemens AG/Infineon Technologies AG, who introduced the product in 1997. About the size of a postage stamp, MMC weighs approximately two grams. This is similar to the Secure Digital (SD card), and smaller than older memory card formats, such as the SmartMedia card and CompactFlash (CF card). By October 2002, the MultiMediaCard offered a range of storage capacities up to 128 MB.

    Like SD and CF cards, MultiMediaCards are much more rugged than traditional storage media. All three cards have an operating shock rating (basically, the height you can drop them from and still have them work) of 2,000 Gs, compared to a 100-200 G rating for the mechanical drive of the typical portable computing device. This translates to a drop to the floor from 10 feet, as compared to a single foot for the mechanical disk drive. Both MMC and SD cards use metal connector contacts, instead of the traditional pins-and-plugs, so they aren't as prone to damage during handling.

    MMC, like SD, features encryption capabilities for protected content, to ensure secure distribution of copyrighted material, such as digital music, video, and eBooks. The MMC Association (MMCA), whose members include Hewlett-Packard, Hitachi, Nokia, Sanyo, Siemens, and Palm, is dedicated to the promotion of MMC as an open global standard.



    A Secure Digital (SD) card is a tiny memory card used to make storage portable among various devices, such as car navigation systems, cellular phones, eBooks, PDAs, smartphones, digital cameras, music players, camcorders, and personal computers. An SD card features a high data transfer rate and low battery consumption, both primary considerations for portable devices. It uses flash memory to provide nonvolatile storage, which means that a power source is not required to retain stored data.
    An SD card is about the size of a postage stamp and weighs approximately two grams. It is similar in size to a MultiMediaCard, but smaller than older memory card types such as the SmartMedia card and the CompactFlash card. Both MMC and SD cards provide encryption capabilities for protected content to ensure secure distribution of copyrighted material, such as digital music, video, and eBooks, but SD cards are available with storage capacities as high as 128MB, with a 512MB SD card expected to be available by late 2002.

    SD cards are more rugged than traditional storage media. They have an operating shock rating (basically, the height you can drop them from and still have them work) of 2,000 Gs, compared to a 100-200 G rating for the mechanical drive of the typical portable computing device. This translates to a drop to the floor from 10 feet, as compared to a single foot for the mechanical disk drive. Both MMC and SD cards use metal connector contacts, instead of the traditional pins-and-plugs, so they aren't as prone to damage during handling.

    The SD card was jointly developed by Matsu****a, SanDisk, and Toshiba.
    Me = Nokia 5170/Palm III > Kyocera 6035 > Treo 600 > Treo 650 > Treo 700p > Treo 755p > Treo Pro > Palm Pre

    Wife = Treo 600 > Treo 650 > Treo 755p > Palm Centro > Palm Pixi
  3.    #3  
    I still do not see a difference but am glad the got rid of the **** in Matsu****a!!!!
  4. #4  
    isn't mmc slower, and you can have secure ones?
    Felipe
    On the road to 5,000 posts
    Life is what happens between Firmware releases.
  5. #5  
    major differences between MMC (Multimediacard) and SD
    (secure digital card).

    SD is an improvement of MMC, released two years after the second.

    MMC transfer rate is 16 mbit/s
    SD transfer rate is 80 mbit/s

    Means that SD cards have superior performances in r/w access than MMC, expecially with devices supporting the full SD transfer rate (USB2 readers, recent PDAs, recent digicams) the improvement is dramatic.

    SD are into an electrostatic protected policarbonate.
    (more durable than standard MMC pt)

    SD cards have special circuit that allow copy protection for OEM distributed products. (for example...software, music, videos or other stuff, directly sold into SD...) anyway, no commercial response yet. (maybe DVD and CD are enough for anyone

    MMC does *not* support, copy protection.

    SD readers are backward compatible, i mean...SD readers can read SD and MMC cards. MMC readers CANNOT read SD cards.

    This is because SD cards/readers have 6 pin + a lower down checksum pin + a dual (probably used for higher transfer rates) split pin (total 9) MMC card have a total of 7 parallel pin.

    Last but not least, SD cards have a lock switch on the side that prevents data to be written or deleted.

    Also...as easy to imagine...SD are far little espensive than MMC.

    Regards,

    Jined
    Last edited by jined; 01/26/2004 at 09:22 AM.
  6. #6  
    My Treo 600 came with a warning not to use MMC cards. It stated that I would risk permanent damage. Why would this be the case based on the above?
    -Lammy

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