Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 43
  1. #21  
    But then there is the one thing Treos can't do that Blackberries can: connect to BB servers used in so many corporations around the country. If you told the people you were oohing and ahhing that they can't get their work email without leaving a computer running at their place of work 24/7 and even that crashes quite often (usually, I've found, the day you leave town for a business trip), they would pass. At least they do at my place of employ.
  2. #22  
    This strikes me as entirely backward. Every corporate entity that has a BB server also has a mail server (usually an MS Exchange server, which does IMAP) which could be used all by itself. The addition of a BB server is an awkward contrivance aimed at making mail available to a single vendor's hardware.

    Marc
  3. #23  
    Originally posted by polscphd2b
    The continued increasing popularity of the Blackberry stumps me.
    Why? The Blackberry does corporate e-mail better than any device on the market including the T600. That's why people love it so much and that's why palmOne is trying so hard to get Blackberry services on the Treo.

    If future BB integration works out to be as seamless as it is on actual RIM devices, you'll see Treo handhelds in the top spot very quickly because people like the form factor better, and they want a real organizer and better phone.

    D.
  4. #24  
    Originally posted by mblank
    This strikes me as entirely backward. Every corporate entity that has a BB server also has a mail server (usually an MS Exchange server, which does IMAP) which could be used all by itself. The addition of a BB server is an awkward contrivance aimed at making mail available to a single vendor's hardware.

    Marc
    Of course they have mail servers, but that doesn't mean they want to (or should) allow wide-open internet access to them. Most security-minded enterprises want to obsure mail servers because of the potential security risks. Proprietary and (more) secure wireless access apps like BB provide a secure bridge without heavyweight cumbersome VPN dialup software and e-mail app integration. Everything happens transparently for the end user and IT dept.
  5. #25  
    What's wrong with IMAP and SSL?

    Marc
  6. mtk
    mtk is offline
    mtk's Avatar
    Posts
    88 Posts
    Global Posts
    91 Global Posts
    #26  
    SSL shrouds the connection and securely identifies the server, but unless you use client certs to authenicate the client, you're exposing your internal IMAP server's authentication mechanism to the outside world. that at least makes it possible for bad guys to attempt ID/password scans or to try for buffer overruns in authentication code or to exploit known default admin ID/passwords. with client certs and an ACL based on client cert identity, you can at least restrict the use of the SSL "tunnel" to someone with access to the private key of the client cert. the downside is that i know of know palm IMAP client that supports the use of client certs and even if there was one, it would mean that some central intrastructure droid iwould have to maintain the ACL, hand out the certs, etc, etc. any exposure of a mailbox to the outside world (even via blackberry software) will bring some risk. technically, the use of a VPN makes more sense, especially on a handheld with limited ability to do more than one thing at a time. with a VPN, each app that wants to communicate with the "inside" of your company doesn't have to be modfied to support special security requirements. you just re-use the VPN connection.
  7. #27  
    Originally posted by mblank
    This strikes me as entirely backward. Every corporate entity that has a BB server also has a mail server (usually an MS Exchange server, which does IMAP) which could be used all by itself. The addition of a BB server is an awkward contrivance aimed at making mail available to a single vendor's hardware.

    Marc
    The BB server allows secure access based on something other than a password, which IMAP does not. Go back 2 years and there was no device that could get email on the go. That is why BB works, and that is why the Treo will never pass BB devices in popularity.
  8. #28  
    Originally posted by mblank
    What's wrong with IMAP and SSL?

    Marc
    All sorts of stuff. How do you get the mail to the device? What device can you hand to an executive, and using IMAP, work flawlessly with no fine tuning? The fact of the matter is the market has shown us that BB is superior to an imaginary IMAP/SSL solution.
  9. KKenna's Avatar
    Posts
    418 Posts
    Global Posts
    419 Global Posts
    #29  
    You guys are missing the point.

    First, running the Blackberry apps on your T600 wouldn't preclude you from running all the other apps you need / like so much. The Blackberry OS is all but defunct with the advent of their line of hybrid devices. These devices all run nothing but J2ME apps. Once Palm officially releases their J2 for OS5, we will probably be able to load the Blackberry apps.

    Secondly, you don't have to use RIM for service. In fact, this was never the case. The original RIM device was developed for BellSouth. The transport for the first RIM branded devices was BellSouth. If you get a 6510 from NexTel or a 6210 from AT&T, they provide the service. If we were able to load the Blackberry apps on our T600s, Sprint / Cingular would provide the serice (In fact, everyone with a 850/950/957 Blackberry has Cingular for service since they bought BellSouth).

    Lastly, RIM has every reason to allow others to sell their software. Look at the numbers. They get a cut, an guess what; if you buy a Blackberry from Sprint/AT&T/NexTel (or just a copy of the apps, I suppose), guess who you get to call for tech support ? Not RIM, unless you have a T-Support contract which runs at least $1,500.00. In fact, RIM has been using the same tactics as Mary Kay or Amway lately. Better to sells tons of stuff to those who with re-sell it than be the retailer. Way more money and way less headache.

    Also, as much as I love Marc's chatter program, there's not an OS5 e-mail app that can hold a candle to the Blackberry solution. If you have the Blackberry Enterprise Server running and you add the MetaMessage platform to it, you can do just about everything from your handheld you could do from your desktop. Add the ability to wirelessly sync e-mail and calendar (and soon contacts and notes) in the background, and this solution is unstoppable.

    Although I left my Blackberry in the dust a year and a half ago, I'd love to switch my e-mail access back to this platform.
  10.    #30  
    Right on. You've said it much better than I could. I didn't realize this topic would creat such passion! Just think what Blackberry service with T600 would do for passion. Lets wait and see what happens when it comes out. I would love to dump my Blackberry.
  11. #31  
    I also think BB is in trouble. Goodlink now works on The Treo 600, syncs more than BB, a low-priced Dell/Goodlink device is coming and Goodlink is now $300+/- per license with no special server required.

    The only advantage that BB has is installed base, and a palm solution eats into that. BB may remain a palm/pocket pc software supplier but their dominance is done.

    I say that based on an exhaustive review of the options for my law firm.
    Enquiring minds want to know ...
  12. #32  
    Originally posted by BaltimoreTreo
    I also think BB is in trouble. Goodlink now works on The Treo 600, syncs more than BB, a low-priced Dell/Goodlink device is coming and Goodlink is now $300+/- per license with no special server required.

    The only advantage that BB has is installed base, and a palm solution eats into that. BB may remain a palm/pocket pc software supplier but their dominance is done.

    I say that based on an exhaustive review of the options for my law firm.
    This is all very interesting. Can anyone tell me why RIM's stock price went up 50% in the last week or 2? I remember talk on this forum maybe about a year ago that RIM was being sued for stealing others technology and their stock price bottomed. Looks like they made a big turn around somehow. I haven't followed it since but it seems they are doing very well as least for now.
  13. #33  
    Much of the bubble mentality of the late '90s is back, so nobody much seems to care that RIMM (as with most tech stocks) is preposterously priced at over 10x sales and 55x next year's projected earnings. It's true they are doing "better", however.

    Marc
  14. #34  
    Originally posted by newtreouser


    This is all very interesting. Can anyone tell me why RIM's stock price went up 50% in the last week or 2? I remember talk on this forum maybe about a year ago that RIM was being sued for stealing others technology and their stock price bottomed. Looks like they made a big turn around somehow. I haven't followed it since but it seems they are doing very well as least for now.
    Who can say? My guess is the recognition that wireless email is a must-have for business coupled with the paucity of publicly traded alternatives for the money to chase.

    But ask yourself this - do you really think that nokia and the other cell phone makers are incapable of working with the carriers to develop wireless email alternatives to RIM? If it gets built into volume devices from the big guys then the devices will be free (like camera phones are becoming) and special servers will be unnecessary. So where does RIM go then?
    Enquiring minds want to know ...
  15. #35  
    The Blackberry does corporate e-mail better than any device on the market including the T600. That's why people love it so much and that's why palmOne is trying so hard to get Blackberry services on the Treo.
    Exactly. I have a Treo 270 (whose network connectivity has never worked well, but that's another story) and a BlackBerry, the latter through my office. I work at a daily newspaper, and the BlackBerry's true push functionality is indispensable for us. For that reason I've never even thought about using e-mail through my Treo. But I'd love to have a real one-device solution. I'd definitely get a 600 once the BB functionality is available for it.
  16. #36  
    Originally posted by EdwardsJ3


    Exactly. I have a Treo 270 (whose network connectivity has never worked well, but that's another story) and a BlackBerry, the latter through my office. I work at a daily newspaper, and the BlackBerry's true push functionality is indispensable for us. For that reason I've never even thought about using e-mail through my Treo. But I'd love to have a real one-device solution. I'd definitely get a 600 once the BB functionality is available for it.
    How is Goodlink less functional than BB? (and Goodlink is available now) Best I can tell, Goodlink one-ups BB because it also wirelessly syncs contacts. Of course, it doesn't help anyone whose enterprise has already standardized on BB.
    Enquiring minds want to know ...
  17. #37  
    Originally posted by BaltimoreTreo


    How is Goodlink less functional than BB? (and Goodlink is available now) Best I can tell, Goodlink one-ups BB because it also wirelessly syncs contacts. Of course, it doesn't help anyone whose enterprise has already standardized on BB.
    The last sentence answers the first one.
  18. #38  
    Hehe, yeah I do watch Oprah (went to the same college - toot toot).

    Anyhoo, while watching her show right before Christmas, when she rolled out the BB for one of her Most Favorite Things show, I was like OH NO, NOT YOU, you really should have more imformed techies on staff.

    Ok, carry on.
    "Everyday is a Gift, A Blessing, An Opportunity!" - GM

    Phone history: Treo 600, Treo 650, Treo Centro, Pixi, Centro again, 800w, Treo 755p, Palm Pre
  19. #39  
    Originally posted by KRamsauer
    The last sentence answers the first one.
    Oh, I absolutely agree that blackberries are necessary if you work for an enterprise that has invested solely in that technology. That's why I don't expect RIM to disappear. I just can't see the company maintaining dominance going forward. They will no longer have a lock on the best hardware and even their software is subject to equivalent or superior alternatives. What they do start with is a dominent market share. Sometimes that is enough and sometimes it is not (spoken as an original owner of an Apple IIe).

    When we evaluated RIM and Goodlink I was struck by the fact that RIM kept touting advantages that were no longer unique to them (e.g. encryption) and advantages they expected in the future (e.g. that they were going to be supporting many non-RIM devices in the future - as will everyone else).

    When Dell releases a cheap device that will synch with Outlook from behind a firewall and doesn't require a special server (that's a prediction for this summer), it will put a lot of pressure on RIM.
    Enquiring minds want to know ...
  20. #40  
    I agree with BaltimoreTreo.

    My group evaluated both BB and Goodlink and came up with the same conclusions.

    With Goodlink available "now" on the Treo600 and their features matching BB, it was a easy decision to go with Goodlink.

    (if there was already an installed base of BB devices, our decision would have been more difficult).

    So far our roll-out of Treo's with Goodlink has been seamless. The feature set is great... and it works!!

    Things will get interesting when there is a BB Treo device. Competition is a good thing. It will make both BB and Goodlink add features that we will all enjoy.
    Bret Snyder<BR>If you don't know where you're going,<BR>You'll probably end up somewhere else.
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions