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  1.    #1  
    I just got confirmation of the collaboration of DrFirst (they're strong supporters of the Treo 600) and ePocrates for e-prescribing. (my blog post)

    My real reason for this post is to ask for stories/anecdotes/speculations about the use of the Treo 600 in healthcare situations. I have a few stories dating back to the 300, but I need to compile more as it might become another means of presenting the T6 as the ultimate converged device.

    You can email: bkmd@wireless-doc.com

    Thanks in advance.
    <a href="http://billkosloskymd.typepad.com/wirelessdoc/">Wireless Doc the blog</a>
  2. #2  
    I am a diagnostic radiologist. There is a Palm app called Pocket Radiologist from Amirsys (www.pocketradiologist.com). Some of the best experts in Radiology assembled a set of titles with the Top 100 Diagnoses in a variety of areas, such as Brain, Spine, Head & Neck, Musculoskeletal, etc. Each title has 100 diagnoses with 2 key images (anatomy/imaging), differential diagnosis, imaging findings, references, etc. Each title is pretty big (images and text are about 700-900k), but with increased handheld memory and SD cards, no sweat. I have used this app on HS Visors and my Treo 180 and 270, and now on my Treo 600 (the Amirsys developers had to patch the Reader app for the particular flavor of Palm OS5 HS implemented for the Treo). This is my 'peripheral brain'--if I have an odd case or just want to check on my diagnosis or differential, I don't need to go to the bookshelf or hit the web, I just reach into my pocket.
    This is of course in addition to the usual smartphone tools (phone, contact list, e-mail). I have converged from 3 devices (pager, phone, PDA) to one.
  3.    #3  
    Hello Jposin:

    If you'd be willing, I'd like to contact you to develop this into a case scenario.

    TIA,

    BKMD
    <a href="http://billkosloskymd.typepad.com/wirelessdoc/">Wireless Doc the blog</a>
  4. #4  
    I'm a senior resident in radiology. I used Pocket Radiologist without issue on my m505, and contacted the developers LONG ago about fixing the compatibility with the Treo 600, but they said they were still working on it. Can you send me the updated prc so I can continue preparing for the boards on the bus!?

    Thanks in advance.

    Evan (evanmair@rcn.com)
    --
    Palm Pilot - Palm III - Palm V - Sprint Treo 600 - Treo 650 - Treo 755p - Pre - 2.1.0 Pre w/ Uberkernel
    Sinclair 1000 - Apple ][+ - C64 - Apple //e - PowerBook 100 - Mac SE - Dell PC - Acer AspireOne - 11" MacBook Air
  5.    #5  
    SORRY, duplicate post
    <a href="http://billkosloskymd.typepad.com/wirelessdoc/">Wireless Doc the blog</a>
  6. emajy's Avatar
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    #6  
    I use my T600 in my dental practice. Epocrates, 5MCC and have my office database converted to a PDB for after hours emergencies.
  7. #7  
    Originally posted by wireless-doc
    My real reason for this post is to ask for stories/anecdotes/speculations about the use of the Treo 600 in healthcare situations.


    You mean like gynecologists using the Treo 600 camera when they're with their patients?


    Handspring needs to come out with a camera-less version for professionals. Delete the camera, add in the Bluetooth chipset, fix ("enhance" in marketing-speak) the speaker and throw in a 320 x 320 screen. Call it the Treo 600 SE and make it available direct from Handspring to cut down on costs. Sell it as the ultimate business tool: Treo 600 SE - the 5 oz laptopô
  8. #8  
    Originally posted by The Chupacabra




    You mean like gynecologists using the Treo 600 camera when they're with their patients?


    Handspring needs to come out with a camera-less version for professionals. Delete the camera, add in the Bluetooth chipset, fix ("enhance" in marketing-speak) the speaker and throw in a 320 x 320 screen. Call it the Treo 600 SE and make it available direct from Handspring to cut down on costs. Sell it as the ultimate business tool: Treo 600 SE - the 5 oz laptopô
    you left out a much needed voice recorder. hard wired car kit would be nice as well for the cdma version.
  9.    #9  
    Originally posted by The Chupacabra

    You mean like gynecologists using the Treo 600 camera when they're with their patients?
    Handspring needs to come out with a camera-less version for professionals. Delete the camera, add in the Bluetooth chipset, fix ("enhance" in marketing-speak) the speaker and throw in a 320 x 320 screen. Call it the Treo 600 SE and make it available direct from Handspring to cut down on costs. Sell it as the ultimate business tool: Treo 600 SE - the 5 oz laptopô
    While I think that your example is a little extreme, I think it's important to have a policy that clearly states that any type of photography in the patient setting is discouraged and then only allowed if the patient is informed and consents. This is especially important now that phonecams have become prevalent. With the HIPAA regulations being instituted, patient privacy is being well considered.

    I agree that some sort of customization should be available in future models. (I even think that other manufacturers will produce devices that are similar to the T6's form factor because it works so well.) But it will probably take developing a strong user base (selling plentitudes of T6's), before the Treo "family" can grow.

    Just to add...From talking with different tech companies, it's amazing how little research is done on how their customers actually use their products. This informal survey I'm doing is the best approach for providing feedback toward addressing the general needs and wants of the users, IMHO. And, I agree the goal should include having a handheld device that can replace a laptop. VoIP will also become extremely important to have in the ultimate converged device.
    Last edited by wireless-doc; 12/20/2003 at 10:33 AM.
    <a href="http://billkosloskymd.typepad.com/wirelessdoc/">Wireless Doc the blog</a>
  10. #10  
    Originally posted by wireless-doc
    I just got confirmation of the collaboration of DrFirst (they're strong supporters of the Treo 600) and ePocrates for e-prescribing. (my blog post)

    My real reason for this post is to ask for stories/anecdotes/speculations about the use of the Treo 600 in healthcare situations. I have a few stories dating back to the 300, but I need to compile more as it might become another means of presenting the T6 as the ultimate converged device.

    You can email: bkmd@wireless-doc.com

    Thanks in advance.

    The Treo 600 is not a practical design for most healthcare settings:

    - It can't be used in many hospital settings since it's a regular cellphone (potential conflicts with telemetry).

    - The screen is too small for anything but cursory data usage.

    - The unit is too fragile for use on wards.

    - The battery life is too short for serious PDA usage.

    - No Bluetooth or 802.11b connectivity.

    - It has a camera.

    - It's slippery and easily dropped.

    - It's expensive.

    I see very little that argues in favor of a Treo 600.

    On the other hand, an updated CLIE UX-50 will be a MUCH better choice for physicians:

    - Landscape view, hi-res screen.
    - Clamshell design - no case needed.
    - Better quality construction.
    - Bigger keyboard.
    - WiFi + Bluetooth included.
    - Longer battery life (and can be extended with a clip-on battery).

    The CLIE would just need a better, slightly bigger screen, more memory and to delete the camera to be the ideal device for clinicians. An updated CLIE UX + the new Sony Ericsson T608 (once the software bugs are worked out) will be a killer combination. If Sony Ericsson doesn't put out a PalmOS smartphone by Summer, 2004 I'll probably go the CLIE/SE T608 route next year.
  11. #11  
    Originally posted by wireless-doc


    While I think that your example is a little extreme, I think it's important to have a policy that clearly states that any type of photography in the patient setting is discouraged and then only allowed if the patient is informed and consents. This is especially important now that phonecams have become prevalent. With the HIPAA regulations being instituted, patient privacy is being well considered.

    I agree that some sort of customization should be available in future models. (I even think that other manufacturers will produce devices that are similar to the T6's form factor because it works so well.) But it will probably take developing a strong user base (selling plentitudes of T6's), before the Treo "family" can grow.

    Just to add...From talking with different tech companies, it's amazing how little research is done on how their customers actually use their products. This informal survey I'm doing is the best approach for providing feedback toward addressing the general needs and wants of the users, IMHO. And, I agree the goal should include having a handheld device that can replace a laptop. VoIP will also become extremely important to have in the ultimate converged device.

    The Gyne-Camô was a joke. Barely. Privacy is about to take a big hit in the next year or so. Imagine a phone smaller than the Treo 600 with a digital camera, video camera with 20 x digital zoom and the ability to upload to the Internet immediately. Not good. (www.mobileasses.com is the beginning of the end.) Regulations mean very little, as I'm sure you're aware.

    The CLIE UX series is the future for PDAs for physicians. Anything much smaller simply isn't practical.
  12. #12  
    Look Mr. Know-it-all-Chupacabra, these people are already in the medical field and using their Treo's to do their work . Also your immature crap about taking pictures of patients by Gynecologist really turns me off. You don't belong in this thread Goat-sucker!
    Ed
    Visor Deluxe, Prism, Visorphone, Treo 270, Treo 600, Treo 650, and am eagerly waiting for the next generation Treo...but wait...is that the iPhone????
  13. #13  
    Originally posted by Treo Rat
    Look Mr. Know-it-all-Chupacabra, these people are already in the medical field and using their Treo's to do their work . Also your immature crap about taking pictures of patients by Gynecologist really turns me off. You don't belong in this thread Goat-sucker!

    No one gives a rat's a$$ about your turn offs, Rat-Boy. Really.

    If you knew anything about how physicians actually work, you'd realize everything I said is true. But you're not a physician and you don't know what you're talking about. Next time, don't interrupt when the grown ups are talking.



    The Chupacabra might just have to pay you a little visit tonight, Chico.
  14. #14  
    Originally posted by The Chupacabra

    The Treo 600 is not a practical design for most healthcare settings:

    - It can't be used in many hospital settings since it's a regular cellphone (potential conflicts with telemetry).

    - The screen is too small for anything but cursory data usage.

    - The unit is too fragile for use on wards.

    - The battery life is too short for serious PDA usage.

    - No Bluetooth or 802.11b connectivity.

    - It has a camera.

    - It's slippery and easily dropped.

    - It's expensive.
    Sigh.

    -The cell phone/medical equipment interference thing is an urban legend, pure and simple. Our hospital (large university medical center) just contracted with a cell provider to place antennas throughout the facility so cell phones can be deployed as "always available" pager replacements.

    -The screen, while clearly not up to snuff for medical imaging, is perfectly adequate for checking labs, radiology reports, OR schedules, etc.

    -The unit is plenty sturdy if one handles it as a piece of computer equipment and not a laryngoscope handle.

    -The battery life is outstanding (hooray Palm-based devices!) if one can maintain the discipline to plug it in to charge every night or so. (Although a replaceable battery would permit keeping a "fresh spare" ready at all times.)

    -802.11 would be a HUGE improvement, although you'd be surprised how well Sprint signals penetrate even large hospitals.

    -Cameras (of FAR superior quality to the T600's) are routinely employed in the medical setting, especially in teaching hospitals. Yes, issues of consent and confidentiality must be addressed, but there are visual aspects of patient care that written words simply do not do justice. Surgeons, plastic surgeons in particular, find medical photography essential in chronicling the manipulation of tissue. (And for the various snickering, stoned teenagers who like to make their inarticulate voices heard around here, no, I am NOT referring to "boob jobs.")

    -eGrips make great Christmas gifts for the T600-using MD on your list.

    -Yeah, it's funny how technology costs money...

    In summary, there are many PDAs in daily use by physicians of all stripes. None are perfect, but the T600 serves me and a number of my colleagues quite well at present.

    Mr. Goatsucker, I am sorry you are dissatisfied with the T600, and further appreciate your concern for myself and my colleagues that we might be suffering in silence as the device egregiously underserves us. However, we do not need you to speak for us, and I for one do not WISH you to speak for us. Please desist using the medical establishment as a vehicle for hawking your personal gripes and "wish-list" regarding the T600's capabilities.

    Happy Holidays all!
  15. #15  
    I use my Treo 600 on a daily basis.

    Looking forward to my local HMO's getting together to publish their formularies in PDA format.

    My hospital has a web based lab/dictation/results lookup, just came out with a wireless PDA version which actually works--I can check labs, schedules etc. from my Treo. My hospitals have no problem with Sprint, and have repeaters set up indoors.

    Online journal searching is getting there, the Annals of Internal Medicine has an excellent wireless PDA lookup.

    Wish the Treo had a voice record function to try voice-digital dictation, or at least to try to hot-synch to our dictation service.

    My Treo is my pager, phone, medical reference, web browser (and MP3 player, when I go for a run while on call I only need the Treo, not beeper, phone and MP3)--the only thing I'm not doing currently is dictation/records.

    Our 100+ doctor multispecialty group is looking to move towards this platform to take the place of our paging service.


    John (Internal Medicine)
  16. #16  
    Originally posted by Ethereal


    Sigh.

    -The cell phone/medical equipment interference thing is an urban legend, pure and simple. Our hospital (large university medical center) just contracted with a cell provider to place antennas throughout the facility so cell phones can be deployed as "always available" pager replacements.

    -The screen, while clearly not up to snuff for medical imaging, is perfectly adequate for checking labs, radiology reports, OR schedules, etc.

    -The unit is plenty sturdy if one handles it as a piece of computer equipment and not a laryngoscope handle.

    -The battery life is outstanding (hooray Palm-based devices!) if one can maintain the discipline to plug it in to charge every night or so. (Although a replaceable battery would permit keeping a "fresh spare" ready at all times.)

    -802.11 would be a HUGE improvement, although you'd be surprised how well Sprint signals penetrate even large hospitals.

    -Cameras (of FAR superior quality to the T600's) are routinely employed in the medical setting, especially in teaching hospitals. Yes, issues of consent and confidentiality must be addressed, but there are visual aspects of patient care that written words simply do not do justice. Surgeons, plastic surgeons in particular, find medical photography essential in chronicling the manipulation of tissue. (And for the various snickering, stoned teenagers who like to make their inarticulate voices heard around here, no, I am NOT referring to "boob jobs.")

    -eGrips make great Christmas gifts for the T600-using MD on your list.

    -Yeah, it's funny how technology costs money...

    In summary, there are many PDAs in daily use by physicians of all stripes. None are perfect, but the T600 serves me and a number of my colleagues quite well at present.

    Mr. Goatsucker, I am sorry you are dissatisfied with the T600, and further appreciate your concern for myself and my colleagues that we might be suffering in silence as the device egregiously underserves us. However, we do not need you to speak for us, and I for one do not WISH you to speak for us. Please desist using the medical establishment as a vehicle for hawking your personal gripes and "wish-list" regarding the T600's capabilities.

    Happy Holidays all!
  17. #17  
    Originally posted by Ethereal


    Sigh.

    -The cell phone/medical equipment interference thing is an urban legend, pure and simple. Our hospital (large university medical center) just contracted with a cell provider to place antennas throughout the facility so cell phones can be deployed as "always available" pager replacements.

    -The screen, while clearly not up to snuff for medical imaging, is perfectly adequate for checking labs, radiology reports, OR schedules, etc.

    -The unit is plenty sturdy if one handles it as a piece of computer equipment and not a laryngoscope handle.

    -The battery life is outstanding (hooray Palm-based devices!) if one can maintain the discipline to plug it in to charge every night or so. (Although a replaceable battery would permit keeping a "fresh spare" ready at all times.)

    -802.11 would be a HUGE improvement, although you'd be surprised how well Sprint signals penetrate even large hospitals.

    -Cameras (of FAR superior quality to the T600's) are routinely employed in the medical setting, especially in teaching hospitals. Yes, issues of consent and confidentiality must be addressed, but there are visual aspects of patient care that written words simply do not do justice. Surgeons, plastic surgeons in particular, find medical photography essential in chronicling the manipulation of tissue. (And for the various snickering, stoned teenagers who like to make their inarticulate voices heard around here, no, I am NOT referring to "boob jobs.")

    -eGrips make great Christmas gifts for the T600-using MD on your list.

    -Yeah, it's funny how technology costs money...

    In summary, there are many PDAs in daily use by physicians of all stripes. None are perfect, but the T600 serves me and a number of my colleagues quite well at present.

    Mr. Goatsucker, I am sorry you are dissatisfied with the T600, and further appreciate your concern for myself and my colleagues that we might be suffering in silence as the device egregiously underserves us. However, we do not need you to speak for us, and I for one do not WISH you to speak for us. Please desist using the medical establishment as a vehicle for hawking your personal gripes and "wish-list" regarding the T600's capabilities.

    Happy Holidays all!

    That "urban legend" is alive and living in every ICU I've ever seen. And most hospitals.

    The screen may be adequate for occasional use by the typical under-30 year old intern or med student. Grown up docs would not appreciate squinting at a two inch screen all day.

    The Treo 600 is many things. Sturdy it is not. A device designed like the Dana would make more sense for physicians.

    3 hour (non-replaceable) battery life is not "outstanding". Think about it.

    802.11b should be considered mandatory for any PDA to be used in a hospital setting. But if you're just an individual that's personally opting for a converged device, it may be less of an issue. Many physicians are still using Palm III and are perfectly happy. It all comes down to what compromises you're willing to accept.

    Proper cameras are used in the APPROPRIATE setting. The Treo 600 is utterly useless for medical photography. If you disagree, you obviously have a lot to learn about medical photography. It would be considered inappropriate to photograph patients with anything other than a real (expensive) camera. Any physician using a cameraphone for even the least stringent medical photography is a quack. If they can't see why this is wrong, they shouldn't be in pracrice.

    Use the Treo 600 regularly and you'll probably drop it - sooner rather than later. Grip tape shouldn't have to compensate for design deficiencies.

    The $600 spent on the Treo 600 could easily go toward a different PDA that makes more sense in terms of how typical clinicians (not you) actually do and could use their PDAs. In surgery you always aim to use the right instruments for a given procedure. Yes, it's possible to do an open chole with a bone chisel. But why try when you can just use a scalpel? I congratulate you and any others that have somehow managed to integrate a Treo 600 into their practice. But you need to remember that you are not the norm. Most physicians would be better served with an alternate instrument.
  18. #18  
    I use my Treo 600 on a regular basis in the hospital (I'm a senior internal medicine resident). For areas of the hospital where they are picky about cell phone usage, I merely turn off wireless mode. It's immensely convenient to carry only one device, and reasonably affordible compared to the overpriced Sony UX series (I got my Treo via upgrade pricing).

    One of the most useful features has been the ability to go into silent mode with an external switch. I often go in and out of situations where I need to be in silent mode. This was a brilliant design by Handspring.

    I have no need for WiFi as our hospital has no WiFi network, but this may be an issue for some.

    Bluetooth would be nice, although my main use in my previous Palm (Tungsten T3) was to connect with my cell phone, which is not an issue now.

    The camera is pretty much useless for anything other than quick snaps for picture caller ID, but it probably costs next to nothing to include.

    The only issue I have had is that most medical software doesn't support the 5-way - this is particularly annoying for programs like ePocrates. The benefits still far outweigh the downsides.
  19. #19  
    I understand that many if not most programs are not 5-way compliant but are these programs stable on the device ? I am particularly interesred in e-pocrates.
  20. #20  
    Hello friends,

    I'm a 5th year surgical resident currently in a hand and reconstructive microsurgery department in an Asian tertiary hospital.

    I have been a faithful follower of the treo series since the 1st T180 came out. I wanted to add some comments to the fray about the T600.

    1. GOOD : The Keyboard is the best thing that has happened to PDAs since touchscreens. I can type at least 50% faster and it makes taking notes or sending sms msgs so much more enjoyable. Rarely do i even take the stylus out.

    2. OK : The form factor is comfortable

    3. BAD : The screen really should be a higher rez as I have difficulty viewing plucker or blazer pages comfortably. Useless for viewing proper medical images... but barely ok just to have some idea what an article is talking about.
    Also, the fact that the screen is actually a 12bit screen SUCKS as the dithering is very noticeable next to the glorious screen of a Tungsten3.

    4. GOOD : The battery life is excellent for me. Lasting up to about 2 days with heavy to moderate use is excellent for me as that's the longest (during a call) that I might have to do w/o charging

    5. BAD : The camera is poor quality and useless for medical imaging. I carry around a proper digital camera for that purpose anyway. I use it for a little daily visual journal of intersting stuff that i see, adding notes and reviewing them via splashphoto.

    6. GOOD : I use some Skyscape apps, handheldmed and plucker downloaded sites on my palm and they have been tremendously useful. From AtoZDrugs, to the Washington Manual to Handbook of Fractures, they have been invaluable for a quickie read. These apps are better supported than in any other platform including WindowsCE and hence steering me away from other competitors like the Ericsson P900 and XDA2 even though they are pretty good in their own right.

    7. OK : My hospital does not have a wifi network so it doesn't matter to me and from what I have read, WIFI on would drain the batteries of a PDA pretty fast so that it may not be all that practical. At the end of the day, I use the Treo more for its medical reference functions as well as its phone and messaging functions more than internet surfing anyway. For that, I firmly believe that the desktop would be MUCH better suited to the task. WIFI internet (as well a video playback btw) in general is more for geeky showoffs than for real use. (The only exception is in hospitals where you have an integrated system that can provide you with patient labs etc via wifi.)

    8. GOOD : The SMS, and phone functions (especially the innovative Handspring way of searching for contacts) has made the stock apps BETTER than almost everything else out there. Even if you GIVE me some of these apps (eg. Beyond contacts etc), I wouldn't use them. Handspring has done a pretty good job here with only minor issues that are beyond the scope of this msg.

    9. GOOD : I just got a set of eGrips --> excellent stuff in general as I feel much more secure with the Treo. Try it, I'd give them an 8/10

    10. OK/BAD : Reception compared to other consumer phones seems to be slightly poorer. I can't figure out why Handspring couldn't get the reception perfect with that big antenna of theirs. Damn itty bitty Nokias with no antenna have better reception most times.

    11. OK/GOOD : Build quality MUCH better than the T180 but still falls short of the XDA levels of finish and sturdiness

    12. GOOD : Not a clam shell design. I think this is good as I find all the flipping open and close irritating and also introduces mechanical wear on the device.... Do I hear osteoarthritis??

    13. VERY BAD : No voice recorder / dialling. Dialling is not impt to me (that's more a whiz bang feature) but no voice recording on a device like this is UNFORGIVEABLE. If itty bitty SIEMENS phones could do this 2 years ago... why can't they put this feature in??? It has a microphone, it has a fast enough processor, and it has ample memory (esp with the SD card).... but it still can't do it!!!! And this is after EVERYONE griped about it in the Treo 180/270/300 series. Sigh.

    That's all I can think about for now, if you've read the whole post up to now, whew. Tell me what u think.

    Kevin
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