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  1.    #1  
    I bought a Kingston 128MB SD card from PC Mall prior to receiving my new treo600. When I went to copy files to it, it would only hold 120MB. I reformatted and still 120MB. Both the Treo and Windows report 120MB and won't format it as anthing else.

    I emailed Kingston and got a response that this is normal due to formatting. Normal!!! To loose 8MB to formatting? Not satisfied I called Kingston, talked to a CSR, a Manager, and a Lab Tech who agreed I needed a new card. So they sent me a new one.

    Guess what... 120MB!!! Not only is it 8MB short, the new one gets stuck in my Treo everytime. I have to pry it out with a knife. It goes all the way in, but doesn't pop back up.

    Has anyone else seen this? Don't tell me that 128MB SD cards are really only 120MB.
  2. #2  
    Welcome to the world of operating systems! This happens with hard drives, memory cards, and more.

    When a manufacturer says that a 128MB memory card can hold 128MB, they are talking about 128,000,000 bytes. I know that Windows does this, and I'm sure that Mac and Linux do something similar, but Windows considers 1MB to be 1,024,000 bytes. So for Windows to report 128MB, the card would really need to have a capacity of 131,072,000 bytes.

    My Sandisk 128MB card also reports being 120MB, so it's a standard thing.

    Just imagine, though, how much space can be "lost" with that kind of difference. The 40GB drive in my desktop shows up as 37.27 GB.

    - Mike
  3.    #3  
    40GB HD formats at 37.8, yea that sucks, but I can understand it. I was just expecting to get a lot closer to 128MB with my 128MB card. We all know that if these companies wanted to be honest they would sell a 136MB card and label it 128 since that's what you would get. Or call it a 120MB card. Why even bother calling it 128 if they know your going to get significantly less than that.

    I know, I know. Because their compeditor(s) would sell a card for the same price labeled 128 when theirs were labeled 120 and they would loose buisiness.

    Wasn't there a class action lawsuit a bunch of years ago about monitors when everyone called it a 17" but it was actuall 16.1 viewable? I remember getting a check in the mail for like $3 from Compaq. Seems like I heard something similar about HD sizes too.

    I guess that's my venting for the day. I still have to send this new card back since it gets stuck in my Treo.
  4. #4  
    Just curious - how can you "understand" when someone else gets 93.18% of what is represented (37.27 of a claimed 40) but you are complaining about getting 93.75% (120 of a claimed 128)?

  5.    #5  
    I know... I ran the numbers too. I guess I "understand" on a hard drive because I'm used to it. If I get a 40Gb HD and it's actulally 37GB, I don't really notice the difference. I get a 128Mb SD card and it's 120Mb I notice. That's 3 more songs I could've slapped on there.


    All-in-all I guess I just hadn't thought about it or expected it before buying the card and was disappointed when I found out. I was thinking of it like RAM (which of course doesn't get formatted).
  6. #6  
    Originally posted by mikev
    Welcome to the world of operating systems! This happens with hard drives, memory cards, and more.

    ... snip
    I know that Windows does this, and I'm sure that Mac and Linux do something similar, but Windows considers 1MB to be 1,024,000 bytes. So for Windows to report 128MB, the card would really need to have a capacity of 131,072,000 bytes.

    ...snip
    - Mike
    Hmmm... I wouldn't assume about Linux like that

    When I do a 'man du' ... which explains the use of the 'disk usage command', I get the following response (in Linux, Solaris, etc.)

    NAME
    du - estimate file space usage

    SYNOPSIS
    du [OPTION]... [FILE]...

    DESCRIPTION
    Summarize disk usage of each FILE, recursively for directories.

    Mandatory arguments to long options are mandatory for short options
    too.

    ... snip ...

    -h, --human-readable
    print sizes in human readable format (e.g., 1K 234M 2G)

    -H, --si
    likewise, but use powers of 1000 not 1024

    ...snip...

    SIZE may be (or may be an integer optionally followed by) one of fol-
    lowing: kB 1000, K 1024, MB 1,000,000, M 1,048,576, and so on for G, T,
    P, E, Z, Y.

    So, with Linux at least, you can have it whatever way you want, including 1M=1,048,576

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