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  1. #101  
    Originally posted by The Chupacabra
    Sprint could get a lot of new subscribers if they start locking people in to two year contracts with ultra-cheap Treo 600s starting December 1. If Amazon is doing it for $250, maybe Sprint can top them. Do I hear $200? $200! Do I hear $150? $150! Do I hear...
    I'm all for cheaper phones, but I sure hope the carriers don't start offering nothing but 2-year plans or make the price difference between a one-year and two-year plan more than the $50 they currently are.

    Scott
    Now THIS is the future of smartphones.
  2. #102  
    Originally posted by Scott R
    I'm all for cheaper phones, but I sure hope the carriers don't start offering nothing but 2-year plans or make the price difference between a one-year and two-year plan more than the $50 they currently are.

    Scott
    I don't see how they can subsidize the phones much more without long term contracts. Now that number portability is here, no one has any incentive to stay with a single carrier year after year. Since customers aren't loyal, the best way to keep people from constantly switching is to hook them into a long term contract like the carriers are now doing.

    I'm just surprised the difference between 1 and 2 year contracts is only $50. For just $50 it's a mistake to lock yourself in for an extra year. I'll bet next year we'll see offers like a free Treo 600 if you sign up with a 3 year contract and less of a push for 1 year contracts.
  3. #103  
    Yes, but what will the early-termination penalty be on this 3-year contract? I don't see the government letting them get away with charging more than $300 for that. So, if it stays under $300, the advantage is still with the consumer, because I can get a more expensive phone at a deeper discount with a 3-year contract but just cancel out early. Here's another idea for the FCC...how about making the carriers decrease the early termination fee over time. If I've only got one month left on my contract, I shouldn't have to pay the same early termination fee as someone who has 11 months left.

    Scott
    Now THIS is the future of smartphones.
  4. #104  
    I ordered the Amazon deal on Monday. They said 4 weeks but shipped on Tuesday so they must have got restocked. Now watcing Fed Ex bounce my 600 all over the country- Left texas , then to Tennasee, now it's in salt lake city utah. I am in Alabama and have no idea why they are giving it the senic tour of the US


    Originally posted by The Chupacabra
    One problem with the Amazon.com offer though: they're quoting a 4 - 6 week delivery time now, suggesting they sold out of their stock today.

    I'll bet they get more stock quickly and actually ship within a few days.
  5. #105  
    Originally posted by Scott R
    Yes, but what will the early-termination penalty be on this 3-year contract? I don't see the government letting them get away with charging more than $300 for that. So, if it stays under $300, the advantage is still with the consumer, because I can get a more expensive phone at a deeper discount with a 3-year contract but just cancel out early. Here's another idea for the FCC...how about making the carriers decrease the early termination fee over time. If I've only got one month left on my contract, I shouldn't have to pay the same early termination fee as someone who has 11 months left.

    Scott
    Carriers aren't dumb enough to give away something for nothing. No one's going to be getting a phone for less than what the carrier makes back in the contract.

    The best deal would be if Amazon.com came out with $300 (1 year contract) unlocked GSM Treo 600s so that you could at least easily sell them or port them to another GSM carrier at the end of the year. Only problem is GSM data charges are ridiculous. $8/month for 1 MB from AT&T? $20/month for 8 MB? They need to stop smoking crack. The Treo 600 can burn through that much data in a few minutes!

    http://www.attwireless.com/personal/...de/plans.jhtml
    Last edited by The Chupacabra; 11/27/2003 at 12:59 AM.
  6. #106  
    Originally posted by fletchb
    I ordered the Amazon deal on Monday. They said 4 weeks but shipped on Tuesday so they must have got restocked. Now watcing Fed Ex bounce my 600 all over the country- Left texas , then to Tennasee, now it's in salt lake city utah. I am in Alabama and have no idea why they are giving it the senic tour of the US



    Great news. I figured Amazon has now learned it's best to tell people the worst case scenario re: shipping, even when they know it won't happen. That way people post nice comments on message boards about how they got their orders "a month early" instead of screeching incessantly that their orders are late by 7.395 minutes.
  7. #107  
    Originally posted by The Chupacabra



    Great news. I figured Amazon has now learned it's best to tell people the worst case scenario re: shipping, even when they know it won't happen. That way people post nice comments on message boards about how they got their orders "a month early" instead of screeching incessantly that their orders are late by 7.395 minutes.

    Less than 72 hours until we see what Sprint has in store for us. I can't wait to see how low T600 prices will drop next week!

    Has anyone with a Sprint T600 been able to roam in Canada?
  8. #108  
    Originally posted by The Chupacabra


    I don't see how they can subsidize the phones much more without long term contracts. Now that number portability is here, no one has any incentive to stay with a single carrier year after year. Since customers aren't loyal, the best way to keep people from constantly switching is to hook them into a long term contract like the carriers are now doing.
    That statement is true with some phones, but not Sprint's version of the Treo 600. As you know Sprint is the only CDMA provider around (atleast here in the USA). So if you buy a Treo 600 that is CDMA you are already locked in, in a sense. Given it's a phone/PDA hybrid it's much more addictive to keep than the average cell phone.

    I think time will prove Sprint Treo owners to be the longest term customers. Also, Treo owners are buying higher priced plans for data usage. I think Sprint's best customers may prove to be Treo owners. It would be in Sprint's best interest to get their version of the Treo 600 into customer's hands. And I think they should offer current Treo 300 owners a good upgrade deal. One that involves turning in the old unit for a very nice discount.

    True all cell phone providers make their big money off the monthly fees, but I think Sprint's Treo owners are the last folks that need to be locked into longer term deals. The benefits of the unit plus it being CDMA will keep Treo owners around. They just have to convince more people to get one . And now would be the best time to hold on to current Treo 300 customers and get them to upgrade, before they jump ship and get a Treo 600 from another provider.
  9. #109  
    Originally posted by darnell

    That statement is true with some phones, but not Sprint's version of the Treo 600. As you know Sprint is the only CDMA provider around (atleast here in the USA). So if you buy a Treo 600 that is CDMA you are already locked in, in a sense.

    I think Verizon is also CDMA.
  10. #110  
    Originally posted by The Ugly Truth



    I think Verizon is also CDMA.
    Really? I did not know that. I wonder if a CDMA Treo 600 made for Sprint's network would work on Verizon's? I wonder if a Treo 300 made for Sprint would work on Verizon's network?
  11. #111  
    Originally posted by darnell
    Really? I did not know that. I wonder if a CDMA Treo 600 made for Sprint's network would work on Verizon's? I wonder if a Treo 300 made for Sprint would work on Verizon's network?
    If memory serves, Sprint and Verizon use two different frequency bands. I believe that manufacturers often build support for both bands into their CDMA phones so that they can be offered for either carrier, however these are usually "locked" to a particular carrier and are not as easily circumvented as is often the case with GSM phones. There has been some speculation that the CDMA Treo 600 does support Verizon's band and that Verizon may offer the phone in the future, but unlocking an existing Sprint Treo 600 for Verizon's network may not be possible.

    Scott
    Now THIS is the future of smartphones.
  12. #112  
    Just to clear things up a bit, the Sprint Treo 600 will roam onto Verizon's CDMA 800 MHz network out of the box. I added Sprint's "Free and Clear America" option to my plan, which allows me to spend up to 50% of my minutes roaming on Verizon for a flat $5.00 per month. There is no data roaming, however.
  13. #113  
    Originally posted by Scott R
    If memory serves, Sprint and Verizon use two different frequency bands. I believe that manufacturers often build support for both bands into their CDMA phones so that they can be offered for either carrier, however these are usually "locked" to a particular carrier and are not as easily circumvented as is often the case with GSM phones. There has been some speculation that the CDMA Treo 600 does support Verizon's band and that Verizon may offer the phone in the future, but unlocking an existing Sprint Treo 600 for Verizon's network may not be possible.

    Scott

    You can use a Sprint Treo 600 on Verizon's network.

    Verizon should be offering their own version of the Treo 600 early in 2004.
  14. #114  
    Originally posted by The Ugly Truth

    Verizon should be offering their own version of the Treo 600 early in 2004.
    Based on ?

    I'd love to get a Verizon treo 600 but besides the attempts to make a Sprint unit workable and the infamous "letter" (which doesnt commit to anything), Ive seen no indication the Treo is coming to Verizon anytime soon.
    Pete
  15. #115  
    > ...Also, Treo owners are buying higher priced plans for data
    > usage.

    Incorrect - data costs $15 - flatrate.

    Sprint TREO users may have higher "minute" plans, but the data is essentially "free". Handspring told us (repeatedly) in their financial docs that flatrate plans such as Sprint's HARM TREO sales since they do not allow the ARPU (Average Revenue Per User) to be differentiated by data use - a cheap data-using phone supplies no less money to Sprint than an expensive one.

    > ...I think Sprint's best customers may prove to be Treo owners...

    This may be true but it has nothing to do with data - it has to do with well-off niche buyers tending to buy high-priced/high-minute plans.

    > ...It would be in Sprint's best interest to get their version of the
    > Treo 600 into customer's hands...

    Perhaps - but only perhaps.

    > ...And I think they should offer current Treo 300 owners a good
    > upgrade deal. One that involves turning in the old unit for a
    > very nice discount...

    Incorrect - it would be in Sprint's best interest to sell multiple cheap "smartphones" than to sell one TREO - as compelling evidence of this, check what Sprint advertises on their web pages and tv ads and newspaper ads and magazine ads.

    In fact, it is in Sprint's (and all other carriers') best interests to do exactly what T-Mobile is apparently doing - allow palmOne (or ANY high-end low-sales-volume device manufacturer) to sell their phones via a link from T-Mobile's web site, support the device only minimally and pass more thorough support back to palmOne, and literally take no other financial risk (that is, don't BUY any TREOs (or other high-end etc) but simply allow them to be sold via a really cheap URL link).

    The nearterm future, especially with Verizon et al, should be interesting - T-Mobile may have started a trend.

    (from my POV this makes so much financial sense that I can't believe the other carriers haven't already noticed it and are at the very least discussing it)
  16. #116  
    When I mentioned Sprint Treo owners pay more I meant more than people not using data services, but you are right we pay no more than other people who get data services.

    I agree that Sprint should stop trying to take over so much control of the units and leave that up to the manufactures. Sprint should allow as many hardware players into the game as possible.

    Microsoft got big by leaving the hardware to others and allowing IBM-PC clones to flood the market. Sprint should allow more phone makers to flood their market and make access to them easy.
  17. #117  
    Originally posted by SeldomVisitor Sprint TREO users may have higher "minute" plans, but the data is essentially "free". Handspring told us (repeatedly) in their financial docs that flatrate plans such as Sprint's HARM TREO sales since they do not allow the ARPU (Average Revenue Per User) to be differentiated by data use - a cheap data-using phone supplies no less money to Sprint than an expensive one.

    In fact, it is in Sprint's (and all other carriers') best interests to do exactly what T-Mobile is apparently doing - allow palmOne (or ANY high-end low-sales-volume device manufacturer) to sell their phones via a link from T-Mobile's web site, support the device only minimally and pass more thorough support back to palmOne, and literally take no other financial risk (that is, don't BUY any TREOs (or other high-end etc) but simply allow them to be sold via a really cheap URL link).

    The nearterm future, especially with Verizon et al, should be interesting - T-Mobile may have started a trend.

    (from my POV this makes so much financial sense that I can't believe the other carriers haven't already noticed it and are at the very least discussing it)

    Sprint has effectively leveraged their relationship with Handspring to grab customers from other carriers. Their $15 unlimited data is still untouchable.

    I doubt any plans other than flat rate ones will be considered by anyone with a smartphone these days. We aren't talking about just sending a few emails on a "regular" phone anymore.

    If carriers were to move phone sales and support to hardware manufacturers, who would be responsible for ensuring the phones worked properly with the systems? Who would provide support? This sounds like it would open up a can of worms.
  18. #118  
    Originally posted by The Ugly Truth



    Sprint has effectively leveraged their relationship with Handspring to grab customers from other carriers. Their $15 unlimited data is still untouchable.

    I doubt any plans other than flat rate ones will be considered by anyone with a smartphone these days. We aren't talking about just sending a few emails on a "regular" phone anymore.

    If carriers were to move phone sales and support to hardware manufacturers, who would be responsible for ensuring the phones worked properly with the systems? Who would provide support? This sounds like it would open up a can of worms.
    The $15 data service is only the beginning....

    If you sign a new contract for 2,000 minutes and nationwide roaming for $105 a month, they will throw in the $15 data plan for NO CHARHGE and another FREE web enabled camera phone and allow you to share the 2,000 minutes with no charge. And Sprint to Sprint calls is free. Free after 7 PM.
  19. #119  
    Originally posted by zipmitz


    The $15 data service is only the beginning....

    If you sign a new contract for 2,000 minutes and nationwide roaming for $105 a month, they will throw in the $15 data plan for NO CHARHGE and another FREE web enabled camera phone and allow you to share the 2,000 minutes with no charge. And Sprint to Sprint calls is free. Free after 7 PM.
    Here's my delima:

    I already get 2000 anytime minutes, unlimited data, add a phone (minutes being shared with a 2nd phone), and free PCS to PCS calls all for only $85 a month. Via a plan they offered back when the Treo 300 first came out. I'm not starting any new agreement with Sprint, because all of them are worse than what I already have. (And since my contract commitmet has ended, they'll give me 5% off my current plan if I commit to just staying with Sprint another year.) That $105 deal looks good to new customers, but for me that's an extra $20 a month (not including tax and other fees). It would be an extra $240 a year. No sense in me getting a new plan to save $150 . So for me its all about getting a new Treo 600 for as cheap as possible without any new agreement and just using it on my current plan in place of the Treo 300 already being used.

    So I'm one who did not take Handspring's early bird deal and wanted to try and hold out on a bigger price break. Problem for me now though is that my Treo 300 is getting really old and it's battery is not doing so well either. An upgrade deal from Sprint would be exactly what I was waiting for. I really wanted to wait till I could get a Treo 600 for $250 sometime way in the future, but given my need to get something to replace this near dead Treo 300 I could do $299. Heck even if there is no great December specials from anyone I may have to give in, bite the bullet and buy from whoever I can get anything off from.
  20. #120  
    Hi, I have a question regarding the Amazon and Sprint rebate coupons.

    I just ordered the T600 from Amazon and printed the two sets of rebate coupons ($150 Sprint & $200 Amazon) from the Amazon site. Maybe I'm being too paranoid, but the small print on the Sprint rebate requires the "original certificate" (i.e. rebate coupon) and further states "NO PHOTOCOPIES WILL BE ACCEPTED".

    Will printouts of the certificate from Amazon's site qualify as "original"?

    Also, the Amazon rebate coupon states that a 1st month
    Sprint bill must be submitted with their coupon by 1/30/2004. If the Treo 600's won't even arrive until 1/14/2004, there's really not much of a chance that anybody will be able to submit the Amazon rebate with the 1st month's bill.

    Anybody have any experience with Amazon and Sprint regarding these circumstances?

    TIA!

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