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  1. #2  
    "To take advantage of this small wonder, you'll need a device running PocketPC 2002, 2003 or CE.net. Support for Palm OS 5.X is "coming in Fall 2003", but from what I can glean from the discussion boards, this date has slipped a few times and it could easily be next year before Palm support becomes a reality."
  2. #3  
    "The real bad news, however, is that I've confirmed the observation by other reviewers and users that the card is extremely slow. "

    "SanDisk's SD WiFi card is - if nothing else - a technical tour-de-force. I'm still impressed that a fully-featured 802.11b adapter is now about the size of two postage stamps laid end-to-end.

    What's not impressive, though, is the extremely poor throughput and continued slip of the promised Palm OS drivers.

    At this point, the SD WiFi has some growing up to do. In the meantime, heavy wireless PDA users will be better served by CF adapters or devices with built-in WiFi."
  3. #4  
    still, 300kbps isn't bad for a pda. I won't buy until the next revision, myself.
  4. #5  
    I thought these networks go at around 11MB/s. 300K is a significant loss of speed from that. Do we know if it's due to this particular card/driver or if it's a bottleneck due to the SDIO transfer speed?
  5. #6  
    I just read elsewhere that the SanDisk WiFi SDIO board drivers for PalmOS 5 have been delayed until December.
  6. #7  
    I thought these networks go at around 11MB/s. 300K is a significant loss of speed from that. Do we know if it's due to this particular card/driver or if it's a bottleneck due to the SDIO transfer speed?
    Show me a 802.11b device that does 11Mb and I'll eat this monitor

    The radio link may be for that speed, but I never see more than about 300-500KB/sec. 11Mb should be around 1.3MB/sec theoretical.

    -Rob
  7. #8  
    I have been able to get 4 to 5 Mbps on file transfers with 802.11b from a wireless PC to a wired PC. I have also done Internet tests from of up to 1.5 Mbps, which was limited by the broadband.

    You will never see 11 Mbps though with an 802.11b. This is based off of perfect set of circumstances that I think are impossilbe to replicate in the real world. This also does not account for overhead of a TCP/IP stack. So even if you could transmit at 11 Mbps you would only be able to transmit data at roughly 10.5 Mbps or less due to the overhead.
  8. #9  
    Well I can't make you eat your monitor javascript:smilie('')but I have an iBook, Apple Airport, not even extreme model and a cable modem and was getting 2.5 mb downloads speeds when I was pinging test sites. Does that count?
    Sincerely, Greg
  9. #10  
    Originally posted by lnichols
    I have been able to get 4 to 5 Mbps on file transfers with 802.11b from a wireless PC to a wired PC. I have also done Internet tests from of up to 1.5 Mbps, which was limited by the broadband.

    You will never see 11 Mbps though with an 802.11b. This is based off of perfect set of circumstances that I think are impossilbe to replicate in the real world. This also does not account for overhead of a TCP/IP stack. So even if you could transmit at 11 Mbps you would only be able to transmit data at roughly 10.5 Mbps or less due to the overhead.
    Fair enough, I wasn't expecting 11MB/s, but 300k is ridiculous. It should be able to pull 3MB/s minimum. 1/3 of the theoretical top speed should be cake.
  10. #11  
    Originally posted by lnichols
    You will never see 11 Mbps though with an 802.11b. This is based off of perfect set of circumstances that I think are impossilbe to replicate in the real world. This also does not account for overhead of a TCP/IP stack. So even if you could transmit at 11 Mbps you would only be able to transmit data at roughly 10.5 Mbps or less due to the overhead. [/B]

    Actually, it's more like this:


    11MBps over the air, minus ~3MBps in 802.11 overhead = 8Mbps.

    Full duxplex traffic on a half-duplex wireless LAN: 8/2 = 4Mbps


    The most you will get out of an 802.11b AP that's being jammed with traffic is around 4-5Mbps depending on the vendor. Of course, that's with all the usual Ethernet saturation nonsense - collisions (and they are worse on wireless), etc. A moderately traffic AP will put 2-3Mbps on the wire.

    (Yes, I work with this stuff for a living)


    - Joe
  11. #12  
    After a few days of waiting I got a response back from SanDisk about Palm support for the SDWifi card.

    Thank you for contacting SanDisk Technical Support.

    We do not have Palm support and do not know when we will. There are business issues with Palm Source that are preventing us from delivering a solution. We apologize for the inconvenience that this may have caused you.
    So it may never arrive... just don't know.

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