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  1.    #1  
    Hey everyone,

    I have a 128MB SD card and stored 21 songs on it which takes up 90 MB. They all have encoding between 128 and 192. I was wondering how low encoding you can go without really noticing too much difference, and instructions on how to lower the encoding because I have no idea!

    Thanks in advance!
    -M-
    My Treo: Treo 650, Sprint CDMA. SW: 1.08, HW: A.
    My Plan: $105/mo for 2000 AT, Unlimited N&W starting at 7pm, Unlimited PCS to PCS, No Roaming Charges in the U.S., Unlimited PCS Vision, Unlimited SMS & PictureMail.
    My Stats: Using an average of 50MB of PCS Vision per month. 2,500+ photos in my PCS PictureMail account. Had a Treo 600 since 10/24/03, switched to a Treo 650 on 1/5/05.
  2. #2  
    hi modma,

    i was also wondering how to get the most music out of my SD card, so i did some experimenting with the Ogg Vorbis format (as an alternative to MP3). and as a musician, i consider myself to be fairly critical of compressed digital audio, but i was *more* than impressed with ogg!

    using an ogg quality setting of zero (the scale ranges from -1 to 10), i was able to get a very comparable-sounding song at about 50-60% the filesize of a 128kbps MP3!

    i tried a few different CD-ripping applications (that had built-in ogg encoding) and found good results using CDex: http://www.cdex.n3.net/

    if you don't have the original music source, you may have to do some converting from MP3 to WAV to Ogg, but i think CDex can help you do that, too.

    hope this helps!
  3. #3  
    p.s.: also note that pTunes can play a mix of MP3s and Oggs with no problems! (you don't have to convert existing MP3s if you don't want to)
  4. #4  
    Originally posted by modma
    Hey everyone,

    I have a 128MB SD card and stored 21 songs on it which takes up 90 MB. They all have encoding between 128 and 192. I was wondering how low encoding you can go without really noticing too much difference, and instructions on how to lower the encoding because I have no idea!

    Thanks in advance!
    -M-
    192kbps is a pretty high bitrate for a phone. You'd probaby need a decent amp and speakers to hear the difference between this an 128k. Most people encode mp3s at 96 or 128k for decent sound. You could go as low as 68k and probably not notice too much degradation.

    THere's a lot of info on the web about this. For example, check out http://faac.sourceforge.net/
  5. #5  
    i just converted all of my songs to ogg and it took 200MBs of 128-160kbs mp3s and fit them into 96MB!!!! I noticed while playing them in ptunes that they all have almost perfect quality. i also noticed that the bitrate kept changing as the music got more complex thus ogg is a variable bitrate format. i have to say this is pretty damn cool. i can now store about 8 hours of music on a 256MB card. now just imagine that on a 512.

    btw, i converted my existing mp3s using media jukebox and the ogg-low setting.
  6. #6  
    Originally posted by modma
    Hey everyone,

    I have a 128MB SD card and stored 21 songs on it which takes up 90 MB. They all have encoding between 128 and 192. I was wondering how low encoding you can go without really noticing too much difference, and instructions on how to lower the encoding because I have no idea!

    Thanks in advance!
    -M-
    Every mp3 that I have in my collection is encoded in 192. However when I listen to music on my phone I just use a junky pair of portable headphones so I don't really need a high quality mp3. I use a program called dBPowerAmp http://www.dbpoweramp.com/ to downsample all my mp3s. I downsample them from 192 -> 96 and when I play them on my phone they sound fine. If I play them on my stereo I can notice the quality but not when I play them on my phone. The good thing about converting from 192 -> 96 is that it will cut the filesize of your mp3s in half. I have a 256m card and at 192 I could only fit around 4 albums, now I have 7 albums with lots of space left over for backup.
  7. #7  
    Originally posted by paulshu


    192kbps is a pretty high bitrate for a phone.

    The real factor here is not the device, but the headphones...a $5000 stereo system will sound like crap if you use $5 speakers.

    Personally, I rip MP3's at 160k or 192k. Anything more is a waste of memory, and anything below 128k is a waste of music (assuming you're using a decent set of headphones).

    The best way is to experiment. After ripping the same song at 64, 128, 160, and 192, a found a big difference between 64 and 128, and a slight improvement from 128 to 160. I didn't notice much difference going from 160 to 192.

    Michael
  8. #8  
    I downsample my good MP3's (160+) to Ogg and they sound great and reduce size quite a bit.

    -Rob
  9. #9  
    Originally posted by Rob600
    I downsample my good MP3's (160+) to Ogg and they sound great and reduce size quite a bit.

    -Rob
    how do you do that?
  10. dbregman's Avatar
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    #10  
    After reading this thread I have switched to Ogg files for my Treo! The quality is equal and the size is a lot smaller. I found a good ripper called the tkcOggRipper:
    http://www.thekompany.com/projects/tkcoggripper

    I don't think I will be going back to MP3s!

    Thanks to all who post here!!!

    David
  11. #11  
    I am sorry if this is a dumb question.
    Let's say I already have a bunch of 192 and 128 MP3 songs.Let's also say that based on this wonderful thread I have decided to convert them to ogg for.at to save space on my SD card..
    My question: can I just convert the MP3s to ogg... or do I have to go all the way back to the source files. and if I do just batch-convert all of them from MP3 format- is this extremely "lossy" i.e. does the sound quality degrade a whole bunch?
  12. #12  
    I was wondering why people decide to be to lazy to do a search instead of cluttering up the new posts. I have decided on posting this exact same message for every new post with information that has already been discussed. I come on this board looking for new posts and new ideas. When the answers to your questions would only take a second for you to look it up, why not do it. If you look into the amount of reply posts that I have put up, I only have a few because I have gotten the answers that I have needed. Keep in mind that I started with the prism, visor phone, Treo 300, and now the Treo 600 (which I Love). If you are so lazy, please don't buy a Treo 600 because it will take some work to keep it up and running.
  13. #13  
    Originally posted by crazyray

    My question: can I just convert the MP3s to ogg... or do I have to go all the way back to the source files.

    Go back to the source files. There is simply no advantage to ripping a ripped file - it will take the same time to rip a source file or an MP3.

    Michael
  14. #14  
    Originally posted by mfacelle



    Go back to the source files. There is simply no advantage to ripping a ripped file - it will take the same time to rip a source file or an MP3.

    Michael
    Well going to the sources files assumes switching 300 CDs in and out for me, for instance, while converting from MP3 to Ogg directly (if the quality wouldn't be lossy, i.e. copy of a copy), could be done over my entire music collection at once over a span of like 7 weeks because of a slow computer. ;-)
  15. #15  
    Ogg is the way to go!
  16. #16  
    i dont know what you guys are talking about but going directly to ogg from mp3 with media jukebox worked beautifully. it is impossible to tell the difference. For those thinking about doing this, dont listen to the skeptics, i have personally done this and now have over seven hours of music on a 256MB card. I did find that some songs just would not convert properly for some reason but out of the entire batch i only found two with this problem (when converted they sped up and sounded like alvin and the chipmunks). BTW, i played these files on my treo, on my tablet pc and on my desktop with a premium sound system. absolutely no difference. GO OGG!!!
  17. #17  
    I have a lot of experience with both mp3 and ogg file formats as my company develops audio/video distribution sofware, broadcast software, and a media player.

    First, both mp3 and ogg can be variable bitrate, it depends on your settings. I don't recommend that anyone encode a static bitrate unless you have a very good reason to do so. You will be better off with variable bitrate as you can save space and get better quality.

    Ogg files are superior in sound quality to mp3 at the same bitrate. That also means to get the same sound quality, you can use a lower bitrate ogg file (to save space).

    In order to get a decent sound quality, I would recommend you go no lower than the mid 80's for the low bitrate, and let it run up to 256 on the high range. If you are not an audiophile or are using generic headphones/speakers you can just go up to 128 and it will still sound good.

    I also don't recommend that anyone convert mp3 -> ogg as the quality will not be any better than the mp3. You are essentially compressing wav -> mp3 -> ogg, in each step losing data and losing quality. Going directly from wav (CD) -> ogg is a better idea. Some people don't know the difference, but there *IS* a difference.

    I encode all of my tracks in very high bitrate ogg, usually a minimum of 256 and a maximum of 512 (variable). This may sound like a waste of space, but I don't mind. There is no way to ever get a lower bitrate to a higher bitrate so I don't want to ever go back and re-encode my collection. I have a huge amount of storage space on my computer, and I don't need 5 hours of music on my phone or mp3 player.
  18. #18  
    Does anybody know a good freeware application that let's you record streamcast into ogg files? Looking to record some internet radio shows and then listen on the T600.

    cheers
  19. #19  
    I completely agree with kazinvan. I tend to store music in the raw WAV on a seperate drive and then batch convert with EAC into any format I want. Variable bit rate will save alot of space without jeopardizing quality whether oog or mp3. I tend to go higher since I run them through a car stereo when traveling.
  20. #20  
    Originally posted by huberthammer
    Does anybody know a good freeware application that let's you record streamcast into ogg files? Looking to record some internet radio shows and then listen on the T600.

    cheers
    Under Linux you can use Streamripper...not sure on MS.

    -Rob
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