Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 34 of 34
  1. #21  
    Originally posted by lnichols
    Also I don't think you can use BT and Wi-Fi at the same time, unless you use the 5.2 GHz Wi-Fi (802.11a???), because 802.11b and g operate at 2.4 GHZ like BT and they will interfere with each other. So I don't think this fantasy that everyone has about being able to browse the web via Wi-Fi, while talking on their mobile phone with a BT headset is going to work.
    Well looks like I was wrong. TI does have a solution that will allow Bluetooth and WiFi to work simultaneously. The other good news is that chips needed to due the BT/WiFi solution are in the OMAP310 system design, so this functionallity can theoretically be integrated into the Treo line. I looks like three chips would need to be added to the Treo, and software to support it.
  2. #22  
    Originally posted by treotim
    My comments:

    1. Don't put too much stock (excuse the pun) into what a CEO says during a merger announcement (or any other announcement geared towards exciting the shareholders and analysts).
    <<snip>>
    3. For now, enjoy your Treo 600, because it's the best convergence device on the market (especially for those of us who demand a keyboard!).
    Amen to that! Why on earth would a company want to redo a product that is this new? The 600 is selling like a wildfire in southern California....rapidly. You don't spend millions on R&D when the product you are selling is backordered. You spend the money when sales slow way down or stop. They aren't going to update the 600 until we are tired of it, and are expecting something else.
    <CENTER>
    <strong>
    <span style="color: blue;">Where's the "Make Coffee" button again?</span>
    </strong>
  3.    #23  
    The thread on why the GSM TREO was delayed and when it is due (yet another one!) mentions 3500 GSM TREO 600s being shipped - that strongly suggests to THIS reader that (1) there is no market for these cellphones at ALL (relatively speaking) and (2) it will be discontinued sooner than later.

    YMMV
  4. #24  
    Negative vibes dudes. Anyone spot the investor/competitor agenda above? :-)

    What shelf life has any phone got these days? - for a typical handset the lifespan is about 9 months from purchase. The on-sale period is often about 18 months. That is for a standard 12 key phone.

    If you compare the usage of a pda phone that is similar to Treo 600 , the Samsung i300, you will find people using them still two to three years after their appearance. I see them all the time - tried and trusted servants. I feel the 600 will be in this realm. Many on this board will have moved on but plenty of less tech folks will be content to stay with their purchase if the phone delivers what they need. That implies sustained a sales period and probably a rev or two on the same theme.

    my 2c
    Last edited by mwomwom; 10/29/2003 at 06:30 PM.
  5. #25  
    You can't make the keyboard much smaller or the length much smaller without sacrificing screen. The key will be what else can they do - increase screen resolution, incorporate Palm OS 6.0 (which already standardized on Handspring 5 way navigation), add more software, faster processor, etc. While the T600 will inevitably be replaced, I think they've got a solid form factor to spawn future models. Look how long the Motorola V60 series lasted or some of the Nokia models - talk about competition?!? It's much more intense when you're competing with free phones. Luckily for Palm, smartphones aren't being given away just yet.
  6. #26  
    Originally posted by SeldomVisitor
    The thread on why the GSM TREO was delayed and when it is due (yet another one!) mentions 3500 GSM TREO 600s being shipped - that strongly suggests to THIS reader that (1) there is no market for these cellphones at ALL (relatively speaking) and (2) it will be discontinued sooner than later.

    YMMV
    The thread doesn't say 3,500 GSM units were shipped, it's what'll be available from HS's web site initially. You know very well (and have elsewhere reported) that 19,000 Treos were shipped by the end of last quarter which ended in September with manufacturing starting during September.
  7. #27  
    Originally posted by yosemitesamiam


    The 600 is selling like a wildfire in southern California....rapidly.
    I live in southern California and want a Treo 600. How ironic it is that you use the term 'wildfire' to describe the Treo 600 situation here when a real, raging wildfire burns a few miles away from my home...
  8. #28  
    Originally posted by yosemitesamiam


    The 600 is selling like a wildfire in southern California....rapidly. You don't spend millions on R&D when the product you are selling is backordered. You spend the money when sales slow way down or stop. They aren't going to update the 600 until we are tired of it, and are expecting something else.

    First of all, at the risk of feeding the stock market trolls, I'm rather dubious about how well the Treo 600 has been selling. In my area, most Sprint stores received either two or three Treo 600s at the beginning of October and all the stores I contacted say they won't have any for at least another two weeks. It appears that Handspring has botched the rollout and gave the stores those phones so they could claim that the phones were "officially" released. Sprint stores have probably sold less than 100 Treo 600s in the entire Silicon Valley in the past two weeks. I'll take your word about SoCal sales.

    Secondly, if Handspring doesn't already have the followup for the Treo 600 prototyped and ready to be put in production, they are going to be in a very difficult position in six months. Decisions need to be made 12 - 18 months ahead of actual product release dates, so a company that plans to survive NEVER stops spending on R+D. Sony Ericsson already has their followup to the P900 prototyped and could probably start production tomorrow if they wanted to. Palm's inability to get new designs out the door quickly wll probably be their Achilles' heel. Sony Ericsson's R+D department is big enough to revise their smartphones every six months, incorporating any ideas they (or competitors) come up with. Add a Treo type keyboard and buttons to the P900 and suddenly Palm has lost a lot of potential users. Sony Ericsson is going to be relentless in grabbing as big a slice of the pie as possible, likely at Palm's expense.

    Once Sony buys Palm and adds PalmOS to a Sony Ericsson smartphone next year, the market is going to explode. Sony used Ericsson to learn how to make good cell phones. They already knew how to engineer slick hardware. And now they finally will have the ultimate OS on their phones.

    The future's so bright, I gotta wear shades...
  9. #29  
    Originally posted by The Ugly Truth


    The future's so bright, I gotta wear shades...
    The candle that burns twice as bright
    burns half as long.
  10. #30  
    Originally posted by Holocron


    The candle that burns twice as bright
    burns half as long.



    It's better to burn out than fade away.



    Sometimes the truth just isn't pretty™
  11. purpleX
    purpleX's Avatar
    #31  
    Originally posted by mwomwom
    What shelf life has any phone got these days? - for a typical handset the lifespan is about 9 months from purchase. The on-sale period is often about 18 months. That is for a standard 12 key phone.
    The lifespan is contracting considerably due to competition. One thing that Handspring seems to not be able to do is matching the demand curve properly. They are giving a broad curve for a high spike. They try to reduce risk by doing a lot smaller production run, causing them not able to meet initial demand. Maybe the treo300 experiance burns them bad.

    But if they think they still can use treo300 market windows, they will be in for a nasty surprise. Nokia and SE are really taking phone into realm of smartphones in earnest, while Microsoft is not going to lessen their pressure.

    This was not the case with treo 300 and earlier model. Handspring has relatively no serious competitor with 300. What Treo 600 to Palm smartphone is what Vx is to Palm. It's popular, but at the same time perching at pivotal time when competitor are bringing in far more advance models very fast.

    If Handspring stumbles and does not have a good product by next March-May time frame, they will be left in dust. And this time around, they won't be able to sing "19,ooo" applications/ Palm OS momentum, because the other guys have just about the same apps capabilities with far more attractive hardware.
  12. #32  
    Originally posted by The Ugly Truth
    Once Sony buys Palm and adds PalmOS to a Sony Ericsson smartphone next year, the market is going to explode. Sony used Ericsson to learn how to make good cell phones. They already knew how to engineer slick hardware. And now they finally will have the ultimate OS on their phones.
    I totally agree with this guess on what is going to happen. Sony bought Ericsson for the phone technology, and kept the Ericsson name (after Sony of course) for name recognition in the phone space. Now that everyone see SonyEricsson phones, when you see Sony only branded phone in the near future they will have the credibility of being a major player in the phone space (people will quickly forget Ericsson). I would bet a Clie smartphone is already in the works and that it will run the Palm OS. Sony may buy PalmOne and PalmSource so that it will not have to license anything, or may start making Clie devices that will run Symbian to reduce costs on the products. If Sony buys Palm, then the Palm OS will have the upper hand on MS since Sony is already so imbedded in the consumer electronic and home entertainment space that MS so desperatly wants a piece of. If they go Symbian then Palm and MS could both be in big trouble.
  13. #33  
    Originally posted by purpleX

    If Handspring stumbles and does not have a good product by next March-May time frame, they will be left in dust. And this time around, they won't be able to sing "19,ooo" applications/ Palm OS momentum, because the other guys have just about the same apps capabilities with far more attractive hardware.
    Just so your know, the Treo 600 is using TI's OMAP product. The OMAP product is the backend for the WANDA vaporware that you love to talk about. TI is actually selling the OMAP the HS/P1 and I am sure they have a great relationship. TI is not going to stop selling any hardware to HS/P1 for MS's sake. The OMAP product supports both WiFi and BT so it can be added quickly with either one chip for one or the other, or three chips to run both at the same time to the Treo line.

    Your ideas of MS having far better hardware capabilities are warped since the Palm OS can run on the same hardware, it just doesn't need the same level of hardware to run right.
  14.    #34  
    > First of all, at the risk of feeding the stock market trolls, I'm
    > rather dubious about how well the Treo 600 has been selling...

    Ahem...if the "stock market trolls" have been (and I might add - consistently!) correct about the "availability" of the TREO 600 among other things wouldn't it be more appropriate to type something like "Kudoes to the stock market gurus for getting it right"?

    Giggle.
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions