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  1.    #1  
    Hi,

    I just bought a Treo 600 and it should be here tomorrow.

    I'd like to get a good 512 meg SD memory card for it.

    Can anyone recommend a good one - speed and price wise?

    Thanks,

    Kenrick
  2. #2  
    Just shop around and look at price and transfer speeds.

    Quick answer is - they are all the same other than those two things.

    Also, speed doesn't really affect how fast you can copy files to or from the card. That will be limited more by your connection (especially sync) than by the card's speed. Card speed matters mostly when you are writing files to the card using the device it's in, e.g. 1.8 MB pictures using a 5 megapixel digital camera. It's very rare that it'll be much of a factor in a card that's being used in a PDA.
  3.    #3  
    Thanks Wombat2.

    I've not been able to find speeds etc. for these cards.

    Do you have a place you can recommend checking them out, or a card you like well?

    Thanks again,

    Kenrick
  4. #4  
    FYI: Buy.com got's a 512MB card for ~$150...

    http://www.buy.com/retail/product.as...70&dcaid=17070

    10/27/03
  5. #5  
    Anyone see a 1 gig SD card out there for sale????
    GIVE DEBBIE THE CHIMP.....GIVE DEBBIE THE CHIMP!!!
  6. #6  
    Eleggua - I am using a Sandisk 512 MB card and it works fine. I hear Lexar cards are good, if you want a faster card. I just use mine for mp3s so speed doesn't matter much - moving songs is very quick using a USB 2.0 card reader.

    Sandisk is a bit controversial, because last year, a batch of cards were defective, so some people believe that they have "problems with Palm devices". It's sort of an urban legend. Sandisk tends to be the lowest-priced card, but they work fine (albeit at pedestrian transfer speeds - not that transfer speed matters for most PDA uses).
    Last edited by wombat2; 10/27/2003 at 09:25 AM.
  7. #7  
    At the risk of offending some folks here, let me tell you that all cards are not the same and I would strongly recommend against getting a SanDisk card. The Tungsten T3 eats these for dinner and while much of that problem is palmOne's fault, other people using other PDAs have experienced lesser issues with SanDisk cards as well. Additionally, they're slower than some other brands. Now, I can tell you that there are only a couple of companies that actually seem to make the cards and then a hundred companies that rebrand the cards as their own. SanDisk is one of the manufacturers. Another is Panasonic. SimpleTech either uses Panasonic cards or makes their own.

    It used to be that Lexar used Panasonic cards but now you never know and could end up getting a Lexar-branded SanDisk card.

    My recommendation is to spend the few extra bucks and get either a SimpleTech or a Panasonic. Know also that if you want a 512MB card, you're going to typically pay more than twice as much as a 256MB card. You may be tempted by the current low prices on the SanDisk 512MB card, but I really would warn against it. The best price for a Panasonic 512MB card I found a while ago was at Outpost.com for about $180. If you really need 512MB of storage but can live with swapping cards in and out, I'd recommend instead buying two 256MB SimpleTech cards for around $80/each (Amazon is one place).

    Scott
    Now THIS is the future of smartphones.
  8. #8  
    Oh, just to add to this...I think SanDisk's warranty is 3-years, Panasonic's is 5-years, and SimpleTech's is lifetime. Don't trust me on this, though, as I'm doing this from memory (no pun intended).

    Scott
    Now THIS is the future of smartphones.
  9. #9  
    Scott R - not to be argumentative, but I'd be interested in some details on "the T3 eats Sandisk for lunch". The only actual problem that I've heard of with Sandisk cards was from one batch, that was basically locked in read-only mode from the factory. Aside from that, all I hear is people saying that they "heard" that Sandisk cards have problems with PalmOS devices. I'm sure there have been some scattered problems, but all cards have a fail rate, and also, a lot of people buying cards are first-time card users who don't quite know what they're doing.

    I've owned four Sandisk cards, which I have used in a TT, TC, iPAQ 5455, Canon PowerShot S200, PowerShot S230, PowerShot S50, and Treo 600. Never a single problem.

    It's unlikely that anyone will make serious use of an SD card for more than three years. In three years, you'll probaby be able to buy a 4 GB card for $150.
    Last edited by wombat2; 10/27/2003 at 09:45 AM.
  10. #10  
    When you say that sandisk cards are slow, what do you mean? I mean, slow doing what?
  11. #11  
    Disk IO. They are actually standard speed (same as most other manufacturers' "normal" cards), where others (notably Lexar) also offer high-speed versions. Card disk IO is a lot faster than USB 1.1 and probably close to the speed of USB 2.0, so this really isn't an issue unless you're using it in a high-megapixel camera, where faster cards reduce the pause after shooting one photo before you can shoot another.
  12. #12  
    Originally posted by wombat2
    Scott R - not to be argumentative, but I'd be interested in some details on "the T3 eats Sandisk for lunch".
    Not for lunch He mentionned about dinner

    Well, I've seen quite a lot of threads in several forums talking about this problem (could be PalmOne's fault) about T3 and Sandisk cards.
    I use a SimpleTech 512 Mb SD Card, and yes, after formatting the card in the Treo 600, it says the card is Panasonic "made by".
  13. #13  
    Originally posted by wombat2
    Disk IO. They are actually standard speed (same as most other manufacturers' "normal" cards), where others (notably Lexar) also offer high-speed versions. Card disk IO is a lot faster than USB 1.1 and probably close to the speed of USB 2.0, so this really isn't an issue unless you're using it in a high-megapixel camera, where faster cards reduce the pause after shooting one photo before you can shoot another.

    I'm sorry, the only thing I understood is that it essentially would slow down the picture taking process. 1-is that right, and 2-is that all? Because if that's the only speed issue, then phonecalls, webbrowsing and application switching would not be affected?
  14. #14  
    It wouldn't slow down anything, in Treo 600. The only thing that it could theoretically slow down would be stuff involving writing BIG files (over a meg, I'd say), and that's not done with the Treo. Pictures taken with the Treo's built-in camera average about 25-30k and take no time to write.

    What I am saying, basically, is that if you want to share the SD card between your Treo and your 5-megapixel digital camera, then it may be worth it to invest in a faster card. If you are going to use it only in the Treo, it won't matter a bit.

    I use a standard-speed Sandisk card in my 5-megapixel camera, by the way, and the speed is okay.
  15. #15  
    A couple of things...

    Just to clarify, SanDisk is one of the biggest manufacturers out there for these cards. So, while there are numerous reported complaints about them, I'm sure this is still a drop in the bucket and the majority of users probably never experience any problems. Personally, I'd rather not take a chance. If you're shelling out top dollar for a Treo 600, what's a few extra bucks?

    Again, you can't say that Lexar cards perform better because Lexar doesn't make their own cards. They used to seem to always re-brand Panasonic cards (which are faster) but increasingly seem to use SanDisk cards (which, of course, should be no faster than a SanDisk branded card).

    Add to all of this confusion that SanDisk has a few different lines of cards out now. They have "high speed" SD cards and "industrial grade" (or whatever they call it - and who knows what that means) SD cards.

    As for why speed is important...I would agree that for most users' needs, you probably won't notice a difference. You could technically record videos and watch them on a Treo 600, where the speed may be an issue, but I personally don't think I'd care to do that on such a tiny, low-res screen. It's also possible that it could be noticeable when accessing a large e-book (dictionary, Bible, etc.).

    At the end of the day, I still recommend SimpleTech. They use Panasonic's fast cards (which I've never heard people report problems with) and give it a lifetime warranty.

    Scott
    Now THIS is the future of smartphones.
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    #16  
    I'm new to the SD card scene. When you say "eats it's lunch/dinner" does that mean the card physically damages itself, or can it just be reformatted and used again?

    I've heard other stories about how "doing the wrong thing" on devices has resulted in damaged memory cards, but nobody has ever clarified was "damaged" means. I find it hard to believe that cards can be rendered completely useless via a software operation. But hey, let me know if I'm wrong. Like I said, I'm new to the scene.
  17. #17  
    Has anyone tried a playing videos off of a Sandisk card? Do they play seamlessly (in other words, is the card fast enough for video)?
  18. #18  
    The card is easily fast enough for even DVD-quality video. The card's read speed is more than 1 MB/sec (to be conservative). Not an issue. The processor will get overwhelmed trying to render frames long before the card speed becomes a bottleneck.

    And when you consider the filesize and streamrates of 160x160 video, or even 320x320, the concern becomes absolutely far-fetched.
  19. #19  
    I have the SanDisk 512 and its great for Video, backups and everything else you can throw at it.

    No problems at all.

    EXCEPT I used a POS card reader I got on ecost... This reader corrupted the card totally.

    Even my printer with its media slots didnt see it after that.


    I was able to reformat it and now it is ok.

    Point is.. the card is not always the problem.. alot of times it is what you stick it in.

    Mike
  20. #20  
    Originally posted by mportune
    I'm new to the SD card scene. When you say "eats it's lunch/dinner" does that mean the card physically damages itself, or can it just be reformatted and used again?

    I've heard other stories about how "doing the wrong thing" on devices has resulted in damaged memory cards, but nobody has ever clarified was "damaged" means. I find it hard to believe that cards can be rendered completely useless via a software operation. But hey, let me know if I'm wrong. Like I said, I'm new to the scene.
    I think most of the time when you hear about problems, they can be resolved by reformatting the card. The current situation with the Tungsten T3 is unique, however, and is resulting in completely unusable cards. Again, the issue here really is with palmOne and not SanDisk. Even if there is something strange about SanDisk's cards, the fact that only the TT3 is doing this sort of damage would indicate that, at the very least, other manufacturers have worked around whatever issues there are. More likely though, there's something "defective" about the TT3 which should hopefully be fixed through a software patch soon.

    Scott
    Now THIS is the future of smartphones.

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