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  1.    #1  
    I was going to write a review about my new 600, but instead I thought I'd try to see what I could do with the camera.

    http://www.wireless-doc.com/treocam.htm
  2. #2  
    Those are some great shots. The Treo doesn't do a bad job as long as there is plenty of light (i.e., outdoors during the day). I have noticed this myself - but this is pretty much the same with every digicam built into cell phones today.
  3. #3  
    Hi,

    loved the photos. You are a talented photographer -

    and the Treo did well too.

    Best wishes

    Jon (UK)
  4. #4  
    I'd say considering these are taken with a phone/pda they are quite nice. I have a Zire 71 and a Sanyo 5300 that I currently use. The picture quality of both leave alot to be desired. After ordering my T6 I began reading all the bad reports of the camera capabilities. I thought to myself, "Just what I need, another device with a camera that sucks." I am now happy I ordered it.
    I'm looking forward to its arrival on Monday and seeing what all it really is capable of.
    My Treo: I think I'll keep her. All dressed up for prom and her date Foleo stood her up
  5. #5  
    Dude! Get out of town! Those pictures ROCK! My T6 comes Tuesday. If it takes pics that good I'll be super pleased. Thanks for posting. They were fun to look at too. Other pics posted here don't come close to yours. Almost seems you got a better cam than the others
  6. #6  
    Great pics!!!

    wireless-doc, did you post all the pics you took, or is that a "best of...". Di you touch them up afterwards? I can get good pics with the cam, even indoors in well-lit areas, but I still have to get used to the timing of the device. Not all pics come out that good for me.
  7.    #7  
    Thanks for the comments.

    Here are some tips for getting good results:

    This camera loves VERY low contrast, flat lighting. On an overcast day, or under the awning of a fruit stand you can get some pretty nice color saturation. If you have to shoot in direct sunlight, make sure the sun is directly at your back to minimize shadows. Even then it's still tricky to shoot in broad daylight.

    As with all dig cameras whites/highlights tend to burn out. Try to keep values of your subject in a decent range.

    Give the camera a little extra time to adjust for exposure. If you watch the screen carefully you can check to make sure that all of the parts of the picture look acceptable.

    The picture of the Newsweek cover was shot at the magazine rack in a drugstore with fluorescent lighting. The camera did a great job rendering the flesh tones of our boy Rush. (Halle Berry is a little greenish though.)

    Just to add: the Sprint picture mail service works great. Once you get a feel for using this camera you'll be able to send some great email images. Now, I just have to figure out how to post these on my blog from the 600.
  8.    #8  
    Originally posted by skfny
    Great pics!!!

    wireless-doc, did you post all the pics you took, or is that a "best of...". Di you touch them up afterwards? I can get good pics with the cam, even indoors in well-lit areas, but I still have to get used to the timing of the device. Not all pics come out that good for me.
    At the beginning, I started trying to fix contrast, brightness, etc. in Fireworks but then realized that the best way to go about this is to be careful about producing the original image.

    All the images you're looking at were not manipulated in ANY way except to scale them all down to 1/2 size. The trick is, if you carefully control the lighting, the camera's autoexposure does a great job and the CCD does a great job in rendering color.

    These represent about 75% of all that I shot, but all the bad ones were shot in the beginning while I was still learning. Once you learn how to check the screen to see how the shot is going to come out, you won't get a bad shot.
  9. #9  
    Originally posted by wireless-doc
    I was going to write a review about my new 600, but instead I thought I'd try to see what I could do with the camera.

    http://www.wireless-doc.com/treocam.htm
    There is no way I believe those came from the same camera my T600 has. I have yet to take a good picture in ANY light condition.

    I hate to say it, but the cam is such a let down - these photos are absolutely not indicative of the norm.

    Ugh.
  10. #10  
    I'm gonna go ahead and call your bluff on these as well. no way these came from a T600. my camera cannot do that.
  11. #11  
    Seems like the pictures might be good eneogh for ebay pictures. Better than I thought they would be.

    I am glad the toilet was flushed.
  12. #12  
    Originally posted by derek985
    These photos are absolutely better than mine.
    Originally posted by petesamprs
    I cannot do that.
    Fixed.

    Also: you both suck.

    wireless-doc -- you rock! The T600 camera is obviously very limited, but you've clearly got a good handle on making it work well. My pictures definitely don't look as good as yours. Thanks for the pictures and the advice.
    Last edited by snerdy; 10/19/2003 at 10:11 AM.
  13. #13  
    I posted this in that other thread where you linked to your photos, but I figured I'd post it here too...

    Excellent job! Those pictures give me new hope. They also further underscore my earlier response to those that misunderstood some of us critics who complained about picture quality with off-the-cuff statements about "well, they're never going to be as good as a 3MP camera." As I said then, I don't need a 3MP camera. I don't even need a 1.3MP camera. What I want is for a manufacturer to give me good quality photos at the resolution they're claiming to offer. The Treo 600 claims to offer 640x480 photos, but at that resolution they're out-of-focus, almost making me wonder if they're not utilizing some sort of digital zoom to take a lower-res photo and store it as 640x480.

    Your images have been rescaled to 320x240. They look very good at that resolution (and I'm sure much of the credit goes to your photo-taking abilities as well). Good quality 320x240 would actually be fine with me, so you've renewed my interest in this phone a bit. Question: Can you take photos directly at 320x240 or do you have to take them at 640x480 and then rescale them on a desktop (which, BTW, is one of my complaints about the Palm OS right now - there aren't any image editing programs that allow you to resize, crop, etc. directly on your PDA - though I'm sure developers will catch up soon)? If you can take them at 320x240 on the phone, do they come out as good as images you took at 640x480 and then rescaled? Thanks,

    Scott
    Now THIS is the future of smartphones.
  14.    #14  
    I went out this morning for an hour because it was overcast, and this is the ideal situation for color photography with this camera. I've also included some shots I took last night from my tv just as an experiment:

    http://www.wireless-doc.com/treocam2.htm

    Scott, I guess you could try to shoot at a lower resolution, but why? I have 500 shots available now. The trick is to carefully compose in-camera, which saves a lot of trouble when you have to manage 30 or more shots in Fireworks. I just rescale and do a bulk export to jpeg format (Fireworks' default is png), and then they are all converted automatically. Working this way is really convenient.
  15. #15  
    Those shots looks great from the treo camera.

    The only thing that would make those baseball pictures look better is if the Cubs were playing the Yankees in the World Series!

    Ohh my beloved Cubs.

    Great pics though!
  16. #16  
    After declaring my dissapointment in another subject on the quality of the camera vs. what I have on my Hitachi G1000, I went back and did some more practice on my husband's brand spanking new Treo 600. The G1000 does better with indoor photos. Far less noise. And it adjusts to the light levels faster. But I have to say once outdoors they seem about even. (You can't tell that by the one outdoor shot in this album because I didn't realize right away my G1000 was shooting at a different angle more up into the light. The 2 photos I took suffered a bit of lens flare. When I get over a minor illness I'll do a more comprehensive outdoor shootout.

    But this is what I have for now:
    http://www.fototime.com/inv/5C606F46A8EA8FF

    I tried my hardest to keep the same distance between myself and the subjects. The G1000 seems to have a wider angle.

    Ordinarily FotoTime will record which device the photos were taken on, and you can view that under the photo info tab. But we had synched both devices to my husband's computer for convenience sake, and he e-mailed me the photos. So the embedded information seems to have been lost at least on the Treo 600 shots. At some point we will set up FotoTime on my husband's computer so embedded identifying his Treo will synch to the album.

    So if we get any really good shots with the Treo 600, nobody will be able to say "Hey you didn't really take that with the crappy Treo camera!"

    I admit to coming into all of this with a touch of G1000 snobbery. I honestly didn't think the Treo 600 could hold a candle to the G1000. But the better acquainted I become with the Treo 600 the more respect I have for it and the more I see I was a big fat doofus!
    Last edited by monkeywithacold; 10/19/2003 at 12:23 PM.
  17. purpleX
    purpleX's Avatar
    #17  
    Time to ditch your G1000 and get the XDAII.
  18.    #18  
    M with a C: Once you start shooting smaller objects (for these cameras that's anything smaller than a basketball), you have to use the background to control exposure. (You can't fill the frame with the object because these cameras don't have a macro mode.) I see you found that out by placing the shopping bag under the statue.

    The easy way out is to buy a large sheet of gray board from an art supply store to use as a background. I used this when I had to shoot a bunch of stuff for ebay.

    For shooting outdoors, just keep watching the screen and recomposing your photo until you manage to get all the highlighted areas filled in with detail. This will prevent lens flare.

    I've posted a full-sized image from my 600, and its scaled-downed version:

    http://www.wireless-doc.com/treocam3.htm

    This is just window light on an overcast day. I'm not even cropping the image. I even think that any attempt to "sharpen" the image would ruin the effect.
  19. #19  
    Wireless-Doc you're a Pro!

    You remind me of this guitar player that was playing at the park mesmerizing his impromptu audience. After he played, I checked his guitar - it was an old cheap student guitar that he bought in a garage sale for $5.

    I can just imagine what you would do with a 3+ megapixel cam! Thanks for the tips. Being inexperienced they will make a big difference to me.
    Ed
    Visor Deluxe, Prism, Visorphone, Treo 270, Treo 600, Treo 650, and am eagerly waiting for the next generation Treo...but wait...is that the iPhone????
  20.    #20  
    Thanks TR, and the others who responded. I just want to make sure the 600 gets the appreciation it deserves, for what it can do. I've got snappermail running beautifully, I get 118 Kbps in my apartment late at night and in the early morning, otherwise it's around 80-90 during the day. I'm checking my todo list while I'm waiting online or else sending a quick email. I can post comments on different forums or blogs, and I think I'm just beginning to find out all the capabilities.

    This is why I'm quick to respond when people criticize the 600 without using it for a while.
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