Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 27 of 27
  1. #21  
    Originally posted by Jay21
    3) Not to sound paranoid here, but wireless calls can be intercepted. Think about this when giving out personal information, such as your SS number or credit card number during transactions on your cell phone.
    Could you explain how exactly a CDMA call or GSM call could be intercepted and decoded to obtain that information? I don't believe it's very easy at all to do what you're saying here with either CDMA or GSM these days without sophiscated/expensive equpiment.
  2. #22  
    Originally posted by Spiffyis5150


    Could you explain how exactly a CDMA call or GSM call could be intercepted and decoded to obtain that information? I don't believe it's very easy at all to do what you're saying here with either CDMA or GSM these days without sophiscated/expensive equpiment.
    You're right, it would be sophisticated & expensive, but not totally impossible. And I never did say it would be so easy to do in my previous post. With identity theft is at an all time high, people just need to be a little more cautious.

    Here is an interesting article:

    It is easy to eavesdrop on many wireless conversations, given how loud some people are when they're talking on their cell phones.

    But how readily could a snoop listen to both sides of a call?

    In the late 1980s through the mid-'90s, it was easy: You could simply buy a scanner at Radio Shack.

    Back then, wireless snoops intercepted calls of Virginia's governor, Douglas Wilder, and the speaker of the U.S. House, Newt Gingrich. An eavesdropper even recorded a spicy cellular chat between a cheating Prince Charles and his lover, Camilla Parker Bowles.

    Today, with most calls carried on digital networks, nosing in on someone's wireless communications is pretty much the domain of professional spies.

    It could cost hundreds of thousands of dollars to mount a serious snooping effort against the user of a digital wireless phone, said Michael King, an analyst with Gartner Inc., a technology research firm.

    "You'd have to have a really good reason for doing it," King said. "Someone would have to be saying something really, really worth knowing."

    Calls made on the older, analog cell-phone network remain as open as ever to eavesdropping, said Semyon Mizikovsky, a member of Bell Labs' Wireless Security & Fraud Prevention Group.

    The Federal Communications Commission has banned scanners that intercept the frequencies used by analog cell phones. But old scanners are still out there, and new ones, sold overseas, can be ordered via the Internet.

    It's much harder, though not impossible, for someone to tap into wireless calls made on digital networks, which now carry an estimated 85 percent of wireless conversations.

    There's no technical barrier to intercepting digital calls, although the equipment and the act are illegal.

    "The equipment can be made if you're willing to pay for it," said Jon Peha, associate director of Carnegie Mellon University's Center for Wireless and Broadband Networks. "It's much easier to build a system that eavesdrops on random calls than one that follows someone around. But if you want to spend enough money, that can be done, too."

    Why would someone bother? Even snippets of conversation can be extremely valuable, said David Yach, vice president of software for wireless company Research in Motion.

    "If I go to a corporate campus, and sit in a car and intercept phone calls, it's likely that I'd get some interesting information," he said. "People have been cavalier about voice. It'd take some high-profile event to wake people up. If someone had overheard an Enron discussion and made billions shorting the stock, that might have done it."

    People who might be targeted by snoops could further safeguard their conversations by encrypting their voice calls. But that precaution is rarely taken now, Mizikovsky said.

    There are no known commercially available systems to intercept the next generation of CDMA communications, said Christopher Carroll, chairman of the committee responsible for the development of third-generation CDMA 2000 encryption and authentication algorithms. CDMA is the technology used by Sprint PCS, Verizon Wireless and Qwest.

    "It will be difficult for even the best professionals to [snoop] in the future," Carroll said. "But security guys never say never."

    As companies look to move more data over the wireless carriers' networks, security has become an increasing concern. Indeed, firms seem more concerned about protecting data than voice.

    "The technology is there to make wireless data secure," said Mike Vergara, director of product marketing for RSA, a firm that supplies encryption technology to phone manufacturers and companies that develop software for the phones. "You can take bits out of the air, but to decrypt them is not economically feasible."

    So, how could determined snoops try to listen in on the digital communications of choice targets, such as Wall Street traders, Fortune 500 CEOs, or elite R&D scientists?

    The simplest way would be to get someone within a wireless company to give a snoop the same network access that law-enforcement authorities get when they have a court order for a wiretap.

    In 2000, federal and state judges approved some 1,190 wiretaps, with 719 applying to cell phones and other portable devices. National security wiretaps are not included in the count.

    A technically adept snoop could also tinker with a phone so that it intercepts calls meant for other subscribers, Yach said.

    Dedicated snoops could even set up a pirate cellular tower to intercept calls. But the tower trick would require a wide range of other sophisticated equipment.

    "This would be extraordinarily difficult - in fact, nearly impossible to do," Mizikovsky said.

    And there are easier ways for most sleuths to get what they want.

    They could, for instance, use directional microphones or laser beams to tease a conversation out of windowpane vibrations.

    Or they could go low-tech, rummaging through bins of paper meant for recycling or just hanging around a targeted person in an airport, restaurant or plane, with ears wide open.

    "I've heard stories of people being hired just to fly business class on certain routes to hear whatever they can hear," Yach said.
  3. #23  
    Lets keep it simple. If there exists the technology to transmit a radio signal the same technology will always exist to intercept it.
  4. mgauss's Avatar
    Posts
    743 Posts
    Global Posts
    745 Global Posts
    #24  
    Hi there guys. I make my living out of selling gauss meters. Our $ 39.95 CellSensor www.techintlcorp.com is specially made to measure cellular phones.

    Now as I've found Sprint uses this frequency changing scheme which makes it read real low on the meter. If I put a digital AT&T phone near the meter it reads it all the way to the right on the needle at 5 feet!

    On a Sprint phone it barely reads it!

    George Lechter
  5. #25  
    i have heard of headaches as well.. but dry mouth is new to me as far as a side effect from cell phone use.

    seriously, this might be something we all need to look into.

    we could be having what we think is a splendid time on our "state of the art" phones when in fact we may actually paying a high price healthwise....

    im all over this one. be back if i can find any updated information supporting health risks associated with the latest cdma cell phones.

    man, just when we thought we caught a glimpse of utopia....
  6. jrv
    jrv is offline
    jrv's Avatar
    Posts
    41 Posts
    #26  
    Originally posted by treobk214
    i have heard of headaches as well.. but dry mouth is new to me as far as a side effect from cell phone use.
    The dry mouth comes from talking a long time without drinking anything.

    If you’re really worried about it use the speakerphone – that’s what I do – and stay out of buildings with microwave ovens.

    The “radiation” from a phone is not going to impact intestinal cell reproduction (unless you swallow the phone perhaps ) but may cause some tissue heating. These are photons – radio waves – not alpha particles.

    Don’t ignore the obvious issues: if you hold phone between your shoulder and ear, as some do with land lines, your head is likely cocked, pressure applied to the ear, and the shoulder and neck muscles fatigued. Even if you hold the phone in your hand your head may well be at an angle.
  7. #27  
    Originally posted by Jay21

    3) Not to sound paranoid here, but wireless calls can be intercepted. Think about this when giving out personal information, such as your SS number or credit card number during transactions on your cell phone.
    Well yeah it can be intercepted...but it won't reveal anything...personally I wouldn't use any wireless device if there was no encryption, yeah I realize encryption doesn't nessecairly keep you safe from such things, but what are the chances of your average joe schmoe carrying around amazingly high tech and rather large decryption products...and the chances of one guessing 2048 characters all in order and correctly (i.e. caps, characters, etc.) are just about the same as someone finding one unified theory for all four of the forces on earth, sure einstein got close, but he didn't get all the way. Unless you're one of america's most wanted and several federal agencies are tracking your every move, no one will know what you are saying.
    Treo 300, Treo 600 - Sprint

    I dream in code and TCP/IP sequence numbers.
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions