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  1.    #1  
    Ok, I keep reading that the Sprint model of the 600 has a bump at the ear piece that is actually due to extra shielding that Sprint put in the phone. And that this was to protect the user's head from radio waves. Does this mean that the CDMA signal creates more radio waves and potential damage to someone than the GMS version? And, I read that the Sprint version has 3.5 hours talk time vs. the GMS version of about 6 hours. Does that mean the CDMA radio is pumping out stronger signals or more of them? Hmmm... Hope that extra shielding works, if so. Can anyone provide any info on this?
  2. #2  
    The FCC publishes all the test stats if you can decipher them.
  3. #3  
    The listed talk times are 4 hours for Sprint, 5 hours for GSM. Although someone posted a thread about the gap being bigger (dunno if that's true).

    FWIW, my Sprint T600's battery seems to hold up fine to both voice and data use. I haven't timed how long it lasts, but it seems equal to or greater than a regular phone (such as a Motorola V60 or whatever the model number is). Better than my old Star-TAC and far better than my T300.

    As for the ear bump, I wouldn't be surprised if CDMA generates more waves (since it's an overall stronger signal, I think), but Sprint could also just be paranoid about lawsuits. I like the bump, by the way. It adds to the look and it makes it easier to know where to hold the phone to your head when talking.
  4. #4  
    Originally posted by mharpen
    Ok, I keep reading that the Sprint model of the 600 has a bump at the ear piece that is actually due to extra shielding that Sprint put in the phone. And that this was to protect the user's head from radio waves. Does this mean that the CDMA signal creates more radio waves and potential damage to someone than the GMS version? And, I read that the Sprint version has 3.5 hours talk time vs. the GMS version of about 6 hours. Does that mean the CDMA radio is pumping out stronger signals or more of them? Hmmm... Hope that extra shielding works, if so. Can anyone provide any info on this?
    Can anyone provide any legitimate info that substantiates the bump on the Sprint Treo 500 speaker is for the purpose of RF shielding? I find that highly suspect, in the same league as the $9.99 RF absorbing strips and the antenna booster strips that sticks in the battery compartment. It is not trivial to shield RF and I cannot believe that bump has any effect whatsoever.

    The location of the earphone jack on the 600 is actually good in terms of not "conducting" RF from the antenna to your ear. Most earphone jacks on cell phones are right next to the antenna and there has been reports of RF coupling from the antenna to the earphone jack on phones of that layout.
  5. #5  
    This is just my observation about the bump/bulge...

    I would have to agree with most of the posts here and I do not think that the bump "shields" RF frequencies - since the RF frequencies are generated by the antenna and not the earpiece. But I do think that the bump minimizes the RF effect.

    I think that the bump "makes" the caller hold the phone differently. I actually hold the phone at more of an angle and the antenna of the phone seems to be angled away from my head more.

    Dave Lindberg
  6. #6  
    Originally posted by mharpen
    Ok, I keep reading that the Sprint model of the 600 has a bump at the ear piece that is actually due to extra shielding that Sprint put in the phone. And that this was to protect the user's head from radio waves. Does this mean that the CDMA signal creates more radio waves and potential damage to someone than the GMS version? And, I read that the Sprint version has 3.5 hours talk time vs. the GMS version of about 6 hours. Does that mean the CDMA radio is pumping out stronger signals or more of them? Hmmm... Hope that extra shielding works, if so. Can anyone provide any info on this?
    I don't know if the Sprint phone is any more dangerous or damaging to a person, but a CDMA radio does produce more EMF on average. The GSM and the CDMA versions both have the same maximum power that they can transmit at, but the GSM transmits less on average. The GSM version only transmits on one out of eight timeslots for a voice call, while the CDMA radio tranmsits longer. Also, GSM seems to make better use of downlink power control. Where if you have perfect audio quality, the phone transmits at the lowest power it can without degrading the quality at all. You can see uplink power control working on your phone by talking on a handsfree kit and watching the signal strength bars. You can have 4 bars with the phone idle, and then bring up a call and see it drop to 1 or 2 bars, but the call sounds fine. It is really just the base station using the least power necessary for good quality. The phone doing this saves power and reduces emmissions.
  7. #7  
    Originally posted by RMitch


    I don't know if the Sprint phone is any more dangerous or damaging to a person, but a CDMA radio does produce more EMF on average. The GSM and the CDMA versions both have the same maximum power that they can transmit at, but the GSM transmits less on average. The GSM version only transmits on one out of eight timeslots for a voice call, while the CDMA radio tranmsits longer. Also, GSM seems to make better use of downlink power control. Where if you have perfect audio quality, the phone transmits at the lowest power it can without degrading the quality at all. You can see uplink power control working on your phone by talking on a handsfree kit and watching the signal strength bars. You can have 4 bars with the phone idle, and then bring up a call and see it drop to 1 or 2 bars, but the call sounds fine. It is really just the base station using the least power necessary for good quality. The phone doing this saves power and reduces emmissions.
    I think you mean EMR rather than EMF. As I recall from physics class a looong time ago, EMF is electromotive force, transmitted through wires. EMR is electromagnetic radiation, transmitted through air. EMR strength is inversely proportional to distance. Having that little bump is not going to create enough distance to make any difference in lowering EMR to your head. I can't believe there is any super duper RF absorbing material behind that bump either. RF at 1900 mhz is not easy to shield. As a test, put your treo in a metal container or in your freezer and call it. It will still ring! My take of the bump is that it is for alignment purposes only. Does Sprint think us Treo owners are such nerds or idiots (as in their commercial) that we can't even line up the hole to our ear without the bump? I much prefer no bump GSM version.
  8. #8  
    I'm guessing that it's because the energy falls off with distance. They measure the rad levels based on distance from the earpiece. Make the earpiece bigger and you can dramatically decrease the levels, possibly just enough to squeak by regulations.

    I wouldn't be surprised to find that the CDMA version just barely passes.
  9. #9  
    As I pondered in another thread....dont put the T600 in your pocket!!!
  10. #10  
    It appears the bump is for the SAR level, as the link below shows Handspring revised and resubmitted their SAR information.

    The Treo 600 CDMA unit has a SAR of 1.53 to the head and 0.861 on the body.

    1.53 is a high rating, as the maximum USA FCC permissible SAR level is 1.60.

    Here's a quick SAR summary:

    SAR values are a measurement of the absorbed radiation energy in units of volumes of brain tissue and are internationally accepted. The SAR for the USA (FCC) is a limit of 1.6 W/kg measured in cubic of 1.0 gram of biological tissue. The SAR value for the EU is a maximum of 2.0 W/kg measured in 10 grams of biological tissue.


    Found the CDMA Treo 600 information from the FCC here:


    https://gullfoss2.fcc.gov/prod/oet/f...ive_or_pdf=pdf
  11.    #11  
    Nice research Centurion. I couldn't get a search for "Treo", on that site, to come up with any Treo filings. How did you find that FCC filing? Could you please find the FCC filing for the Treo 600 GSM version? And post a link? I'm interested in the comparison between the GSM and CDMA versions. Gee, now I'm kinda wondering why a lot of Sprint phones have flip tops. Maybe that's how they get by the FCC requirements by having the radio further from the head. That's one comfort level I liked about the Treo 300. But I'm too much of a sucker for cooler and new features. My 600 should be here any day. Thanks for you research! Mark
  12. #12  
    MHarpin..all of these answers and some interesting discussion is found on another recent thread.

    http://discussion.visorcentral.com/v...4&goto=newpost

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