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  1.    #1  
    OK, like every other freak I've been reading and lurking and gleaning everything I can about the Treo 600 -- and I was ready to go buy one next week when they come out. Seems like the perfect device.

    But today I began to have second thoughts. What I need FIRST and most important is email. Web browsing is cool, and scheduling, and all the other cool programs I have on my Visor Prism -- all important. However, an email from my boss -- priceless. Is the Treo 600 going to do it for me?

    My new firm (I start Monday) loves and supports the blackberry. I guess (?) they run software on their servers that provides remote email service even without an individual server (ala desktop w/ outlook & server program). I will be using a laptop, and the laptop will be out of the office most of the time. I will not be able to have a computer "serving" my wireless device with email, etc. Is the Treo 600 up to this kind of interaction with Exchange server?

    Don't get me wrong -- I'm in love with the Treo 600. However, push email and 100% access all of the time to exchange server is crucial (I split between two offices). Is the Blackberry going to be a better solution because it is so much better supported [and loved] by the firm and its IT people? Thoughts? I guess I don't have to decide until the Treo comes in next week.

    Brian
  2. #2  
    The Treo 600 will run a popmail client. Dunno about MS Exchange.
  3. #3  
    You can get the exact same push functionality for the 600 - the issue, though, is will your IT folks get a separate license (from Good or Visto or any of the options out there) to serve YOU alone? I'm kind of in the same boat, and my IT guys have said - just get a Blackberry.
    So - the technology won't hold you back; cost and support issues likely will.
  4.    #4  
    So nrosser -- are you going to get the blackberry so you can get that functionality? or are you going for the Treo 600 -- what you really want -- and skipping the Blackberry support?

    My problem is that I'm new (haven't even started yet!) and have no "pull" for new things. It's one thing if you're managing partner... another if you're just a "newbie" associate.

    Brian
  5. dsdxp's Avatar
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    #5  
    "Treo 600 or Blackberry?"

    LOL!
    Not all treasure is silver and gold.
  6. Fuzzy's Avatar
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    #6  
    Handspring told me the T600 would have "Blackberry like" functionaltiy. From what I see in the manuals, all they will have is a version of Snapper mail, that checks email every 15 minutes. That's not push email! I currently use an individual Blackberry (not supported by my company) and want to replace it with the T600. It looks like Handspring is not true to their word. Help!
  7. #7  
    The Treo can just like a Blackberry using the Goodlink software. Just like the Blackberry it requires a company to install special server software to use. Your company would have to invest in a second software package and support it for it to work and I doubt that many IT groups would like to support to similar products.

    The treo should be able to pull mail every 15 minutes from your account so I guess you would have to decide if up to 15 minutes is an acceptable time to wait, or convice your IT group that the Treo is great and they should support Goodlink.
  8. #8  
    You've answered your own question. If your company loves and supports Blackberry, and seamless access to corporate email is your primary objective for a wireless device, you must go with Blackberry unless and until your company starts to "love and support" the Treo.

    The Treo 300 was supposed to deliver "blackberry-like" email, but never really did. Will the 600? Maybe, but since you can't leave your office PC running 24/7 (which is a lame solution anyway) that won't mean anything if your company won't install and support Goodlink or some other server-side component.

    And you will have a difficult time convincing your IT group that they should purchase, install and support another wireless email solution if Blackberry is working well. What's in it for them?
    Last edited by John P. Smith; 10/04/2003 at 09:12 AM.
  9. #9  
    here's what I do - I have no plans to get a BB. I use TreoMail for email,which works great to redirect my Exchange mail to me every 15 minutes. I leave my PC connected to the network all the time (not an option for lots of folks). The only true need I have for my PC out of the office is to run ppt presentations, and I do that now on the 300. So for me - I am all set.
    For you - go to www.good.com or www.visto.com or www.seven.com and explore your options. But, as I said initially, and as it was reiterated above, to get BB-like operation without having to leave your PC connected, you'll have to get some server software (no different from what Blackberry requires - people think it's the device that makes this all work - it's actually the server side).
    Good luck!
  10. #10  
    Brianp, I'm in a similar situation. We have two offices (New York & Boston) and I have a lengthy daily train commute, so having email access is becoming increasingly critical. My firm does not have BB support, but I'm in a poor position (I'm an Associate) to request the expense for Good. I'm gently trying to convince a few of the Managing partners that this would be of benefit, especialy since they are on the road more so than I. Hopefully, this will grease the skids a bit.

    For security reasons, leaving my PC connected to the network in the office is not an option.

    For Good or BB support, how much are we talking about for a small company, say 10-20 employees across two locations?
  11. #11  
    If you want an email device first and foremost, and your corporation has BB support, get a blackberry.

    A few people (myself included) actually carry both. Since I would have to carry a phone anyway, cramming a sweet device in there like a Palm is great!
  12. #12  
    Originally posted by Guitar Dad

    For Good or BB support, how much are we talking about for a small company, say 10-20 employees across two locations?
    That's a good question, How much is the server?
  13. #13  
    craigdts,

    I administer a GoodLink Server with 25 users, and here's what I found.

    GoodLink Server will run you about $2K. Then on top of that you have the cost of the devices. The G100 will run you about $350, and of course the Treo 600 is between $450 and $600 depending on the service agreement.

    Its been about a year since I priced Blackberry, so some of this may have changed.

    Blackberry Server was running around $3K. Plus, you had to buy third party software to handle attachments (Goodlink has attachment handling built-in). Then you still had to buy the devices.
  14. NBP
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    #14  
    I am also in a similar situation and here was my analysis/conclusion:

    Analysis:
    1. For e-mail functionality, nothing will be better than an enterprise supported BB. Perhaps a T600 with Good server support will be as good, but that's not the situation at hand.
    2. As a phone/web device/organizer, nothing will be better than the T600.

    Solution:
    1. Buy a BB 6210 (AT&T) or 6230 (T-Mobile) from Amazon.com for $50 (after rebate). It's a basic BB/Phone combo that will get you your e-mail perfectly without laying out a lot of capital.
    2. Now you still have nearly all of your alotted funds to buy a T600 (or perhaps in my case, get a free SonyEricsson T616 to use on AT&T's GSM network - again from Amazon post rebates - or a T610 if you prefer T-Mobile) and then perhaps purchase the T600 down the road and just swap SIM cards from the T616 to the Treo 600, depending on my mood/necessity.

    Here's the final kicker - order either of the SonyEricsson phones mentioned above and Amazon gives you a free Jabra Bluetooth headset - which will be especially useful when there's a third-party bluetooth solution for the T600 (or just wait for the T700).
  15. #15  
    Originally posted by Brianp
    However, push email and 100% access all of the time to exchange server is crucial (I split between two offices). Is the Blackberry going to be a better solution because it is so much better supported [and loved] by the firm and its IT people?
    Yes. Get the blackberry. I use my Treo through Sprint business connect, but always have to keep my blackberry within easy distances in case something gets screwed up. Blackberries are much more reliable.
  16. #16  
    Actually, if you don't really need Palm OS or a cheesy camera, I think the Blackberry 7230 that T-Mobile carries is a better device.

    The e-mail is better, the screen is better, it will view attachment files from Word, Excel, Power Point, PDFs and more. The new web browser is good, and I like the way the keyboard works better.
  17. #17  
    Well, Brian, you may end up like me. I work for the US Govt and carry a Blackberry on my right hip. I really like my Blackberry. For personal e-mail, my schedule, my personal phone, playing Solitaire, surfing the web, and everything else, I have the Treo 600 on my left hip.
  18. #18  
    why not just set your desktop email program to push notes from the boss (or anyone else) to SMS - then you get immediate notification and, if need be, use snapper mail to read the whole message.

    i have my email program (eudora on a mac) set up with filters to forward certain emails to my phone with SMS - it works great!
  19. #19  
    Good has recently changed their pricing. The GoodLink server software costs about $1650, and it comes with 5 user licenses for the first year. Annual license cost for Treo 600 users is $330/yr, compared to about $150/yr for Mobitex devices (Good G100, RIM 957/950).

    I am the IT administrator for my company, and have migrated from Blackberry to GoodLink. In my opinion, GoodLink is much easier to deploy and support than Blackberry, and the features are superior. All of my managers loved their Blackberries, but they were thrilled when we ran a GoodLink pilot and they eventually pushed for the change. I would recommend it over Blackberry any day for new customers looking for a mobile email solution, but large corporations with an existing Blackberry system would probably not want to spend the resources to make the migration. My servers support approximately 40 GoodLink users, and I was able to migrate them all myself centrally from a server without ever visiting a single user desktop.

    With that said, I should mention that Cingular's Mobitex network has far superior coverage compared to GPRS and CDMA 1xRTT for data. For those of you who currently use Blackberries and are looking to switch to a Treo for push email using GoodLink or some other system, you should keep this in mind if you need your email in remote locations. I will still go with the GSM Treo 600 once a reasonable unlimited data plan comes out despite the coverage being worse, since I mostly stay in metropolitan areas and I want Internet access and all the other bells and whistles the Treo has to offer.
  20. #20  
    Originally posted by Brianp
    OK, like every other freak I've been reading and lurking and gleaning everything I can about the Treo 600 -- and I was ready to go buy one next week when they come out. Seems like the perfect device.

    But today I began to have second thoughts. What I need FIRST and most important is email. Web browsing is cool, and scheduling, and all the other cool programs I have on my Visor Prism -- all important. However, an email from my boss -- priceless. Is the Treo 600 going to do it for me?

    My new firm (I start Monday) loves and supports the blackberry. I guess (?) they run software on their servers that provides remote email service even without an individual server (ala desktop w/ outlook & server program). I will be using a laptop, and the laptop will be out of the office most of the time. I will not be able to have a computer "serving" my wireless device with email, etc. Is the Treo 600 up to this kind of interaction with Exchange server?

    Don't get me wrong -- I'm in love with the Treo 600. However, push email and 100% access all of the time to exchange server is crucial (I split between two offices). Is the Blackberry going to be a better solution because it is so much better supported [and loved] by the firm and its IT people? Thoughts? I guess I don't have to decide until the Treo comes in next week.

    Brian
    Listen - don't let any Treo geeks talk you into a bad decision.

    Blackberry is the GOLD STANDARD when it comes to seamless, push driven email. I have had it since it came out years ago - generation ONE.

    Never has anything ever come close to it in my view and anything that tries is basically mimicking what BBerry does. To me, they are all Elvis impersonators.

    The Bberry is matchless and near perfect when it comes to email.

    It has a better keyboard than any of the others. It has a software suite that is email-centric.

    You get an email that has a phone number in it, it provides a hyperlink to the phone app so all you do is click and you are connected (assuming you buy a phone/bberry). It connects perfectly via exchange to your corporate server.

    All these other things are phones or pdas that do other stuff. You want an emailer? Buy and emailer.

    The PDA functions, while not as robust are workable. The construction quality is fine - apart from the first clamshell bberry (which had hinge and weight problems), I've NEVER had one break. EVER.

    The Treo? It's vaporware GSM wise. It is first a phone and a PIM. Everything else is secondary. And it shows.

    I have three devices, soon to be two. The T-Mo color bberry. The SonyEricsson P900 and the Treo 600. One is going on EBay soon - the Treo, which is the most compromised and flawed device of the lot.

    Don't get me wrong - it's not a "bad" product. It just has SO MANY compromises that unless you are crazy in love with the idea of a Treo, you are gonna be upset at the terrible screen, the cramped keyboard, the lack of voice control, the lack of voice recording, no bluetooth, and poor construction.

    The Treo is a great concept with compromised execution by a near bankrupt company that couldn't afford to spend the money to do their product the way it was conceived.

    Sure, the BBerry has a lousy screen. But you are buying an emailer, not a video player. Sure the palm OS is more intuitive than Symbian. But not by much.

    Take it from one of the few people around here who has run these devices through its paces.

    The Treo is the weakling of the bunch - and it's not even close.
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