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  1. BD1
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       #1  
    I have seen two different posts (jamesbond and mikec) who had less then positive feedback about typing on the keyboard and/or the keyboard backlight.

    Starting to have 2nd thoughts......anyone else who has used the T600 have any comments the keys/keyboard.....either positive or negative?
  2. #2  
    Originally posted by BD1
    I have seen two different posts (jamesbond and mikec) who had less then positive feedback about typing on the keyboard and/or the keyboard backlight.

    Starting to have 2nd thoughts......anyone else who has used the T600 have any comments the keys/keyboard.....either positive or negative?
    It looks like the keyboard optimized for one-handed use. I think that people will probably have to get used to thumb typing with only one hand. Once they do, the ewww factor will probably give way to satisfaction. A lot of people have gotten used to operating the Treo 270/300 with both hands -- I know I certainly have.

    While it's easy to dial numbers with one hand on 270, typing actual sentences is more difficult because of the width of the keyboard. The 600's keyboard is roughly one-third narrower and without an actual model in front of me, I'd estimate that it fits neatly between the "e" and "r" keys of the 270. At that width, it would be very easy to reach the far edge of the keyboard while on the 270, I have to stretch my thumb a bit more than is comfortable. So in that respect typing with one hand on the 600 will be alot easier.

    One concern I have is the fatigue factor. Thumb typing can get tiresome and thumb typing with one hand can be even more tiresome. Typing one handed on the 270 means that I have to compress my thumb quite a bit to press the keys nearest to my hand (specifically the "p", "backspace", and "enter" keys if you're right-handed). This can be uncomfortable and with the 600's smaller keyboard, more keys will be closer to my hand when I'm typing. The bigger, domed keys should help compensate for this however.

    Overall, I think that people will have to get used to the smaller keyboard just like they had to get used using a keyboard instead of Graffiti when they went from a conventional PalmOS PDA to the Treo. Once they do, many will probably prefer the arrangement.
  3. #3  
    I suggest you give it a try. I don't know about anyone else, but Sprint gives you 2 weeks to return it for a full refund...
  4. #4  
    I am concerned about the keyboard myself.

    I have had my 300 since last spring and love it. I have not upgraded the software at all and have good battery life. No problems so far with the lid. Love the PDA functions and use it for both my e-mail and and internetting on a number of sites.

    I have found i can type pretty fast and accurate using the two hand two thumb method. Use it for both e-mailing and note taking although I sometimes go to one finger typing.

    If the 600 keyboard is too small for me to be able to type quickly on, Im not sure I want it, despite the other good qualities it may have.
  5. #5  
    Originally posted by DarthRepublican


    It looks like the keyboard optimized for one-handed use. I think that people will probably have to get used to thumb typing with only one hand. Once they do, the ewww factor will probably give way to satisfaction. A lot of people have gotten used to operating the Treo 270/300 with both hands -- I know I certainly have.

    While it's easy to dial numbers with one hand on 270, typing actual sentences is more difficult because of the width of the keyboard. The 600's keyboard is roughly one-third narrower and without an actual model in front of me, I'd estimate that it fits neatly between the "e" and "r" keys of the 270. At that width, it would be very easy to reach the far edge of the keyboard while on the 270, I have to stretch my thumb a bit more than is comfortable. So in that respect typing with one hand on the 600 will be alot easier.

    One concern I have is the fatigue factor. Thumb typing can get tiresome and thumb typing with one hand can be even more tiresome. Typing one handed on the 270 means that I have to compress my thumb quite a bit to press the keys nearest to my hand (specifically the "p", "backspace", and "enter" keys if you're right-handed). This can be uncomfortable and with the 600's smaller keyboard, more keys will be closer to my hand when I'm typing. The bigger, domed keys should help compensate for this however.

    Overall, I think that people will have to get used to the smaller keyboard just like they had to get used using a keyboard instead of Graffiti when they went from a conventional PalmOS PDA to the Treo. Once they do, many will probably prefer the arrangement.
    While the keyboard on the 600 allows typing with one hand more easily than on the original Treo's, I don't believe that it was meant mostly or only for one-handed use. Indeed Handspring stated during Mission Possible presentations that people have reached speeds on its keyboard as they reach on Blackberries.

    Others have stated that it takes time to get used to typing on it. I wonder if having used a prior Treo's keyboard makes it take longer to get used to the smaller keyboard since one has to unlearn that first.

    I, too, will be watching this closely when I get mine. My guess is that I'll get used to it and I expect to go back to my regular Treo typing speed in a week or so. If that doesn't happen, I'll be disappointed. If I really can't type on it at any useful speed (which I doubt), I'll send it back (gulp!).
  6. #6  
    I've played with the Treo 600 keyboard for about 10 minutes and was very impressed. Might get some getting used to for some people.

    I guess it depends on how big your fingers are and how long you've been using a thumboard.
  7. #7  
    A need to "get used to" a feature does NOT make that feature a very good selling point.

    Indeed, if it isn't eminently usable right off the shelf into the potential customer's hands then one is VERY likely to hear that customer say something like:

    == "...Ewwww..."

    Right?

    Giggle.
  8. #8  
    People can get started with this keyboard MUCH better than they would have when introduced to Grafitti, and we all know how successful Grafitti was against all conventional wisdom at the time.
  9. #9  
    Originally posted by SeldomVisitor
    A need to "get used to" a feature does NOT make that feature a very good selling point.

    Indeed, if it isn't eminently usable right off the shelf into the potential customer's hands then one is VERY likely to hear that customer say something like:

    == "...Ewwww..."

    Right?

    Giggle.
    You are reaching so far to find negatives about the 600 that you are making yourself look ridiculous. Who among us has not switched from one TV/VCR/etc to another and felt uncomfortable for a short period with the new remote until our fingers got to know it? Or the arrangement of the stereo controls in our brand new car? Human beings take time to adjust to change, which has absolutely nothing to do with product strength.
  10. #10  
    Though I am indeed negative in attitude toward the financial viability of the TREO 600 (oh, really?), the unfortunate fact for you is that this thread as a whole is "negative" about what many tout as THE feature of the TREO 600 - the keyboard.

    In more than a couple other threads (...) I've taken the stance that the TREO 600 is a $500 cellphone with a few extra features and Jane and Joe Nongeek are simply not going to want to pay an outrageous premium for those few extra features - a-GAIN (as they didn't with the TREO 180, 90, 270, and 300).

    Now we have an entire thread that says "keyboard needs getting used to".

    Well - Big Massive Clue: When Jane and Joe Nongeek go into a store to buy a cellphone they're not going to have "QWERTY" in their heads. So when they are SHOWN a QWERTY keyboard (almost UNDOUBTEDLY seeing for the first time on a phone by them) it sure BETTER be usable by them RIGHT THEN or they will simply say "$500 for THAT feature I can't even USE!?" and they will look elsewhere.

    No kidding.

    =====

    It is real information such as this that interested me in boards like this. Though I think the TREOs (all of them) are cool, I also think they're pretty much unsellable - and that's been pretty much proven right for eveything so far BUT the TREO 600.

    And THAT is all that interests me - the financial side of a cool device.

    (note - I own three cool devices WAY ahead of their time - Commodore Amigas - STILL ahead-of-the-curve in some ways. They were total financial failures, however. Doesn't keep them from being cool.)
  11. #11  
    SeldomVisitor:

    The broken record starts again. I won't repeat yesterday's discussion, you can go back and read my responose to which you had nothing to say.

    This device is:

    - NOT for your Jane and Joe
    - NOT a cell phone with a "few" extra features.

    Disagree? Then go respond to what I said yesterday in the proper thread.
  12. #12  
    I think most everyone on this board would agree that Jane and Joe Nongeek wouldn't care about a smartphone and the extra price it entails. They just want to make phone calls with something that looks nice.

    What you might need for them is price point where the mp3 player, camera, and/or something else, provides the critical application that Jane and Joe want. Jane and Joe like to take pictures with crappy cameras and play music. I think a many million Jane and Joe's also like instant messaging on a desktop and I could see them wanting it in a phone.

    At least at this point Jane and Joe wouldn't make fun of the form factor as they do with my Treo 300.

    So yes, I agree with what you are saying, but it's similar to saying that Ferrari's shouldn't be made, because Jane and Joe Family wouldn't buy one because it has only two seats, little or no trunk, and it's at an excessive price point. At the same time Ferrari is seemingly doing pretty well.
  13. njchris's Avatar
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    #13  
    Originally posted by SeldomVisitor
    A need to "get used to" a feature does NOT make that feature a very good selling point.

    Indeed, if it isn't eminently usable right off the shelf into the potential customer's hands then one is VERY likely to hear that customer say something like:

    == "...Ewwww..."

    Right?

    Giggle.
    That's silly. I had to get used to a PDA.. does that make it not a good feature?? I had to get used to shifting a 6-speed instead of a 5-speed in my car, does that make it a bad feature? Nope. It just means it is different than what I normally did.

    This "negative" thread as you called it looks like it just started out as a question because *TWO* people said they weren't impressed with the keyboard. Then someone chimed in that they like it (you ignored that point).

    You've practically made a decision based on VERY LITTLE REAL information. Didn't you say in another thread (or two) that you don't like thumboards? I guess it's no wonder you jumped in here.
  14. njchris's Avatar
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    #14  
    oops.. messed up a post.
  15. #15  
    > ...Didn't you say in another thread (or two) that you don't like
    > thumboards? I guess it's no wonder you jumped in here.

    Not that I know of!

    But then again, ==I'm== not the topic of the thread.

    Let's move on...
  16. njchris's Avatar
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    #16  
    Originally posted by SeldomVisitor
    > ...Didn't you say in another thread (or two) that you don't like
    > thumboards? I guess it's no wonder you jumped in here.

    Not that I know of!

    But then again, ==I'm== not the topic of the thread.

    Let's move on...
    Yup.. you pick ONE sentence out of my whole post to respond to. And the one that is a separate thought from the rest of my post.

    I take back what I said yesterday about being able to have an intelligent conversation...
  17. #17  
    Originally posted by SeldomVisitor
    A need to "get used to" a feature does NOT make that feature a very good selling point.
    Getting used this keyboard takes five minutes. Do we really think that people won't want to play with this device for at least that long?
  18. #18  
    Originally posted by SeldomVisitor
    > ...Didn't you say in another thread (or two) that you don't like
    > thumboards? I guess it's no wonder you jumped in here.

    Not that I know of!

    But then again, ==I'm== not the topic of the thread.

    Let's move on...
    You aren't the subject of this thread, and shouldn't be. So, let's get back to the topic at hand, er, thumbs, er, whatever!!!

    It took me all of about two hours to get comfortable with the 300's thumboard when I upgraded from my poor old Visor Platinum.

    I suspect it will take me about the same when I upgrade this time. Normally, it would take me a shorter period of time to acclimate to something like this, but I am getting older ...

    Even if it was designed to be more usable for one handed use, I will still probably use two thumbs ... I have this fear about dropping it when I'm in the "reading room."
    << My command as we escape Palm HQ with a new Pre 3>>.

    Treo 300 >> Treo 600 >> Treo 650 >> Treo 755 >> Instinct >> Pre- >> TouchPad
  19. #19  
    I think anything is better than a stylus and Graffiti. I'll adjust to anything that will enable me to have a PDA and email functionality while on the road.

    When I was a kid, I used to have a handheld game called "Electronic Quarterback" by Coleco. It was a thumb game, and I got pretty good at it. Come to think of it, I think I still have it in my basement. I should dig it out!
  20. #20  
    > ...It took me all of about two hours to get comfortable with the
    > 300's thumboard...I suspect it will take me about the same
    > when I upgrade this time...

    Yup.
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