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  1.    #1  
    Now, we all know that the Treo will have an SDIO compatible slot, that is in theory compatible with the upcomming SDIO WiFi boards. Nice to have in order to surf at 11mbps instead of 70kbps. But here is another cool use.

    Add this board to your Treo, along with VLI's VoIP client gPhone, and now you have yourself the coolest Voice over IP phone around. Much cooler than the stuff being made by Symbol and Cisco, that look about as advanced as the 900mhz phones I used about ten years ago.

    The VLI client was originally developed to take advantage of the Tungston C, but I hope that they are looking at taking advantage of the Voice APIs of the Treo. This could be another good killer app for the Treo in corporate America.
    -Druce
  2. #2  
    sounds interesting....when will VoIP be able to reach regular landlines?
  3.    #3  
    Corporate VoIP implementation usually include a VoIP PBX that does the transition to the outside world. However, there are other companies out there on the internet that do the transition as a service that cost a fixed amount per month.

    End result, VoIP doesn't limit you to calling other VoIP phones.
  4. #4  
    A lot of phone companies are looking at VoIP to increase capacity of the network and reduce their costs. I was responsible for engineering a Voice over ATM solution (I also tested VoIP and know how it works) to increase capacity and decrease costs at a previous telecom company that I worked for. The plan was to not even let customers know that they were getting a Voice over services, just to provide them.

    These systems were much more complicated than and IP PBX or current Cisco VoIP solutions. The testing that I did showed that the quality of the Voice over solutions was very close to circuit based solutions. End users could still hook up their analog phone, a T1 to their PBX, but it was data back to the CO where a Gateway converts it back to the circuit switched world.

    Eventually you will be using a Voice over Data solution, even if you don't know about it or want it as it will be the only way for carriers to cut costs and still make a profit. Vonage currently lets people use their own broadband connections for VoIP service, and you can still use all of your old phones.

    In order to use and VoIP solution you will have to have a Gateway (IP PBX, IAD, etc)somewhere to convert the voice data back to circuit switched data so you can communicate with the rest of the world.

    In order to make a treo Voice over IP capable someone would have to put a SIP or MGCP protocol stack (hopefully developers have gotten away from H.323 as it sucks) on the Treo and it would have to be able to communicate with some sort of Gateway device using the same protocol. The gateway would have to be configured to allow the Treo to use it as a gateway.
  5. #5  
    Originally posted by Top Billing
    sounds interesting....when will VoIP be able to reach regular landlines?
    There are all kinds of gateways from the IP network to the PSTN. My basic service is VoIP (Vonage). I use my Treo to provision it.
  6. #6  
    We recently had a VoIP system installed where I work. Our whole department would be VERY interested in a VoIP Palm client (specifically for the Cisco system). We tried the PPC client and it didn't work very well, lots of lockups. I only hope eventually there is a Bluetooth/Wi-Fi combo SD card soon.
  7. #7  
    Integrating with a Cisco VoIP solution may be tricky since Cisco supports standards, but also has some proprietarty one like Skinny. If your company implemented SIP, MGCP, or H.323, then you have a chance. If it is using Skinny, then Cisco would probably have to provide the stack for the PPC and OS5 for it to work.

    whmurray, I was just looking at Vonage and may have to get this for my home. If you are a customer do they give you the ability to connect pure IP phone solutions and use their gateway? Just curious as it sounds like this is what you are implying. I can't find anything on the website for this and the Cisco ATA adapter they provide is just for the analog to VoIP conversion.
  8. #8  
    Why couldn't it be possible to make VoIP calls via 1xrtt (vision). Afterall, Sprint's Ready Link (PTT) is itslef a form of VoIP and will will work via the network's data network! Since, the Treo600 will not be RL capable, it would be great to have a PalmOS solution! Anyway I began a thread about this very topic some time ago:


    http://discussion.treocentral.com/tc...light=ptt.html
    _________________
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  9. #9  
    VoIP is very delay sensitive, and from what I have seen from Vision, data delay would kill it. I am sure that the quality of the PTT will not be nearly as good as the quality of a standard Sprint call. I don't think Vision, in its current state would be a reliable VoIP solution. The PTT will be egineered to work and will probably get preference over standard data for it to work.
  10. #10  
    Originally posted by lnichols
    If your company implemented SIP, MGCP, or H.323,
    We implemented H.323.
  11. #11  
    Originally posted by lnichols
    The PTT will be egineered to work and will probably get preference over standard data for it to work.
    There's no preference. Actually Sprint has been increasing the number of data card on their towers for some time in anticipation of the launch of RL. Thus the network should have more than enough bandwidth to meet demand...
    _________________
    aka Gfunkmagic

    Current device: Palm Pre
    Device graveyard: Palm Vx, Cassiopeia E100, LG Phenom HPC, Palm M515, Treo 300, Treo 600, Treo 650, Treo 700p, Axim X50v, Treo 800w



    Please don't PM me about my avatar. For more info go here.

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  12. #12  
    Wow. I just checked Vonage's site...sounds like an awesome deal provided the service works reliably. Anyone here have experience with it?

    Re: Wi-FI VoIP...I'm not familiar with hi-tech telephony or its jargon. Is this a possibility with the T600? I'm not sure its worth it to add separate voice functionality when its already built into the device, but the concept is hella cool
  13. #13  
    What we're trying to do is get an all in 1 solution. A cellphone (PPC or Palm) that has wi-fi and a VoIP client. When we come to work, the phone would detect the wi-fi connection and all of our work phone calls would also come to our cells no matter where in the building we are.

    Then when we went home, it would detect the wi-fi network there and we'd also have our main work phone line on our cells. So basically someone could contact us no matter where we are and the benifit of using VoIP is that we don't use our cell minutes.
  14.    #14  
    Originally posted by gfunkmagic
    Why couldn't it be possible to make VoIP calls via 1xrtt (vision).
    Actually, you could. Although 70kbps is not the best line to run a VoIP connection across, it is possible. It's just, unless you are calling internationally, it kind of misses the point. With most local carriers (like Sprint) there is no domestic long distance charge anymore, so you really aren't saving money. With WiFi, you can make calls while your radio is turned off!

    In fact, here is a bit of irony. Some airlines are talking about implementing WiFi internet access on their airplanes. With that, you can make phone calls from your Treo, without turning on the Cell Phone functions! Of course, trying to explain to the non-technical flight attendant that you aren't breaking FAA regulations is a different matter all together!
  15. #15  
    Originally posted by Druce MacFarlane


    Actually, you could. Although 70kbps is not the best line to run a VoIP connection across, it is possible. It's just, unless you are calling internationally, it kind of misses the point. With most local carriers (like Sprint) there is no domestic long distance charge anymore, so you really aren't saving money. With WiFi, you can make calls while your radio is turned off!
    Well, like you said, the main advantage for me would be to make international calls via VoIP. And the allure of doing so via 1xrtt is that it frees up the SD slot for storage. Of course, Sandisk's forthcoming wifi+256 MB SD combo card may alleviate this concern, but I still don't like the idea of the card awkwardly sticking out of the Treo. The biggest advantage of wifi IMO, is the fact that it can be used when regular CDMA (or GSM) signals are not available. In fact, I believe this is how many wireless providers are approaching wifi: as an adjunct to their existing wireless networks when regular cellular coverage is not adequate. Specifically, you would use regular cellphone connection (WWAN) when outdoors and then seamlessly switch to wifi (LAN) indoors such as in large buildings or campuses. The only question is, how useful will such functionality be when providers finally rollout their 3G (1xEvDo/v or UMTS) networks which offer bandwidth comprable and exceeding wifi?

    Anyway in my next "dream treo", I would love if PalmOne integrated tri-mode wireless (cdma+BT+wif) like the TI Wanda ref design. However, I think it might be more likely that Sprint integrates either or both BT and RL (Sprint PTT) into the next model. The latter would give Sprint's Treo a very distinctive functionality IMO...
    _________________
    aka Gfunkmagic

    Current device: Palm Pre
    Device graveyard: Palm Vx, Cassiopeia E100, LG Phenom HPC, Palm M515, Treo 300, Treo 600, Treo 650, Treo 700p, Axim X50v, Treo 800w



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  16. #16  
    Originally posted by gfunkmagic
    Well, like you said, the main advantage for me would be to make international calls via VoIP. And the allure of doing so via 1xrtt is that it frees up the SD slot for storage.
    I would bet that if Sprint found out something like this was happening over the Vision network that they would block the IP addresses to the gateways since this could allow someone to bypass the money that they would get for the International connection, or bypass their overage charges if you used all of your plan minutes.

    They couldn't stop the Wi-Fi though since it is not on their network.
  17. #17  
    Originally posted by lnichols
    whmurray, I was just looking at Vonage and may have to get this for my home. If you are a customer do they give you the ability to connect pure IP phone solutions and use their gateway? Just curious as it sounds like this is what you are implying. I can't find anything on the website for this and the Cisco ATA adapter they provide is just for the analog to VoIP conversion.
    They sent me a Cisco box (ATA, analog telephone adapter) that goes between my PSTN wiring and my LAN. This box knows the IP address of their gateway and their gateway recognizes the MAC address of the ATA.

    An arbitrary SIP device would not know their IP address and their gateway would not recognize an arbitrary SIP device.

    Look at Deltathree. This is a service that runs on your PC and is more open.
  18. #18  
    Take charge of your private branch interchange and optimize your system to take advantage of VoIP telephony.

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