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  1.    #1  
    Does anyone know which CDMA chipset that is used in the Treo 600? I just want to find out what the chipset is capable.
  2. #2  
    Airprime. When I looked at the FCC documentation, it seemed to indicate that.
  3.    #3  
    Just found an article on TreoCentral that says the 600 will use the AirPrime 3420, which uses the Qualcomm MSM6050 chip. This chip can use the R-UIM (CDMA SIM card) that will work in GSM phones too, but it is optional. Looks like the chip has a lot more functionallity than will be available on the 600.

    Key Functionality
    Revolutionary radioOne architecture
    Low-cost optimized gpsOne position location technology
    Data rates of up to 153 kbps on forward and reverse links
    Quad-mode (CDMA cellular, CDMA PCS, AMPS cellular, GPS)
    ARM7TDMI® microprocessor
    CMX™ multimedia software
    Qtunes™ audio decoder
    PureVoice® advanced voice recognition software
    MPEG MP3 support
    MIDI ringer
    R-UIM removable card interface
    Page mode FLASH support
    USB host controller functionality
    Binary Runtime Environment for Wireless™ Application Programming Interface (BREWapi™) support

    Also:

    AirPrime’s EM3420, the dual band variant in the EM3400 product series, has enabled Handspring to design the advanced and feature-rich smartphone in an impressively compact size. The EM3420 module unlocks all the wireless features and applications for the Treo 600 including comprehensive voice services, SMS functionality and integrated assisted GPS for E911 compliance. Additionally, the EM3420 enables high-speed bi-directional data rates up to 153.6 kbps to power the compelling data-focused applications that come standard with the device.
  4. #4  
    So if the phone is capable of using sim cards for both sides why don't they just go this route? This I realize may be a naive question but I figured I would ask.
  5. #5  
    Originally posted by PalmMD
    ...but I figured I would ask.
    I did ask this of their Prez Ed Colligan this afternoon, but he didn't give a direct answer. I asked if HS would be offering an unlocked CDMA model. He said you'll be able to roam on other CDMA networks, and that they were talking to Verizon besides having Sprint on board.
  6.    #6  
    Apparently Sprint and Verizon don't want the R-UIM. I think that they have the control freek syndrome and don't want people to have that power. Supposedly Sprint is being sued over this issue, but I am not sure.
  7. #7  
    Can someone here comment about the quality of this chipset when it comes to audio? I maybe wrong that the chipset has any impact on the quality of the calls placed so let me explain my concern.

    My five year old motorola CDMA startac on Verizon is still superior to my treo 300 when it comes to the quality of calls. I don't mean reception (that goes without saying when comparing Verizon to Sprint in SoCal). So, if it is not the service that makes the difference, then it must be one of two things:

    1) CDMA Chipset
    2) Noise cancelling technology implemented

    I'd like to hear thoughts from someone more knowledgeable on this topic.

    Thanks.

    Regards...
  8. #8  
    It figures they are such control freaks and don't want people using phones on other networks, but I am not going to wait until VzW freezes over to decide to get the T600 on their network. So they better offer an unlocked version.
  9. #9  
    My five year old motorola CDMA startac on Verizon is still superior to my treo 300 when it comes to the quality of calls. I don't mean reception (that goes without saying when comparing Verizon to Sprint in SoCal)
    I dont know-For me my Treo300 is the clearest cell phone I have ever used. I have used a startac on Verizon also, and the quality was inferior to my Sprint 300.
    "Matters of great concern should be taken lightly, matters of small concern should be taken seriously."
    -ancient chinese adage
  10. #10  
    Originally posted by wireless-doc


    I did ask this of their Prez Ed Colligan this afternoon, but he didn't give a direct answer. I asked if HS would be offering an unlocked CDMA model. He said you'll be able to roam on other CDMA networks, and that they were talking to Verizon besides having Sprint on board.
    HA! So that was you?! I thought that was a well crafted question. You never said Verizon but he went exactly where I thought you were headed. Very funny. At first, his answer to your question seemed like a dodge (it will roam between networks), but then he went right at the Verizon question. Dead on.

    His comments on Verizon were encouraging. I hope it gets to Verizon, but I have my doubts (just gut feeling, nothing more).
  11. #11  
    I hope VzW picks it up but even if they did so now it would be 4-6 months before they launched it. My last conversation this week with VzW CS Rep is they are not testing it and it is not listed on their tentative list so that means HS better get cracking the ol whip on VzW to get them moving or else I will have to buy direct and pay $$$$.
  12. #12  
    Originally posted by SteveNYC
    HA! So that was you?!
    Thanks, Steve. I think the crucial point is to appreciate how much influence Sprint has in the implementation of the CDMA 600.

    My interest at this event was to network and to see what the vendors had to offer for healthcare enterprise solutions. I already had a chance to check out the 600 at the last CeBIT.

    Not too long ago I had the opportunity to answer some questions from a reporter with Health Data Management magazine about the clinical use of the Treo 300. The prevailing opinion is that it isn't suitable, maybe because most don't know or can appreciate cell data, and think of "wireless" as only meaning wi-fi. Another I learned yesterday is that the SD/IO wi-fi card for palm may take up to a year to come out. Same for telephony-optimized OS 5.

    Currently, I'm researching the issues of HIPAA/security issues and interference with medical monitoring equipment with the Treo. You can check out my blog for my take on yesterday, and you can follow my progress in setting up a pilot project using the Treo 600 for clincial support:

    http://radio.weblogs.com/0120454/

    BKMD
  13. #13  
    Wireless-doc that is a good point. My team focuses on healthcare IT and cell phones are a major no no in hospitals today. But how can healthcare professionals make the most of it? HIPPA should be interesting especially with the camera in the phone, hmmm, lawsuits.
  14. #14  
    Originally posted by PalmMD
    HIPPA should be interesting especially with the camera in the phone, hmmm, lawsuits.
    I don't think the camera would be a concern. Someone could only build a case if an outsider has obtained an image that would readily identify a patient. But if I understand the legalities, you cannot directly sue but must issue a complaint to the Gov't which then would have to take action. BTW, people who try to hack into a hospital's wireless AP could get into more trouble than they would normally expect. No white hat hackers tolerated.

    Bill K.
  15. #15  
    I was actually reffering to someone taking pictures of patient records. I read an article recently where a hospital employee was infact providing an attorney with information for certain lawsuits he was working on.

    From a network side the IT depts are very tight about security as it is. The hospital I was working with needed a way to secure their Nortel AP's from unauthorized users that have Win XP and wireless cards. We are working on helping them correct their settings and working on an additional layer of security for them.

    Its not the fear of the gov't going after hospitals its the fear of someone bringing legal action against the hospital/staff and that can happen.
  16. #16  
    This is going off topic, but this might involve a real problem with pulling out a camera/phone in a hospital setting. I received my information about HIPAA from Healthprivacy.org:

    Myth # 9: Patients will sue health care providers for not complying with the HIPAA Privacy Regulation.

    FACT: The HIPAA Privacy Regulation does not give people the right to sue. Even if a person is the victim of an egregious violation of the HIPAA Privacy Regulation, the law does not give people the right to sue. Instead, the person must file a written complaint with the Secretary of Health and Human Services via the Office for Civil Rights. It is then within the Secretary's discretion to investigate the complaint. HHS may impose civil penalties ranging from $100 to $25,000, and criminal sanctions ranging from $50,000 to $250,000, with corresponding prison terms, may be enforced by the Department of Justice. However, according to the interim final rule addressing penalties, HHS “intends to seek and promote voluntary compliance” and “will seek to resolve matters by informal means whenever possible.” Therefore enforcement “will be primarily complaint driven,” and civil penalties will only be imposed if the violation was willful. Such penalties will not be imposed if the failure to comply was due to reasonable cause and is corrected within 30 days from when the covered entity knew or should have known of the failure to comply. The standard is even higher for imposing criminal penalties. §§ 160.306, 160.312 (a)(1), 160.304(b), 42 U.S.C § 1320 et seq., http://www.hhs.gov./news/facts/privacy.html.
  17. #17  
    does this mean the 600 will work with the wireless modem available by sprint? (i.e. the one from the downloads page)
    Treo 300, Treo 600 - Sprint

    I dream in code and TCP/IP sequence numbers.

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