View Poll Results: Sprint or GSM?

Voters
123. You may not vote on this poll
  • Sprint

    62 50.41%
  • T-Mobile

    46 37.40%
  • Other GSM

    15 12.20%
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  1. #21  
    I'm sold on GSM. The fact that the Sprint phone will only work with Sprint is enough to keep me from going there. I want an exit strategy if my carrier screws me over.

    That being said, I'll stay with T-Mobile only if the upgrade is cheaper or the same as switching to Cingular. Bottom line is that the carrier that gets me the cheapest upgrade will get my business. If Handspring's discount for existing Treo owners isn't enough to keep me, then I expect T-Mobile to belly up to the bar.

    I have no problems signing another contract or switching my phone number.

    I admit it, I'm a ***** :-)
  2. #22  
    Is there now a definitive opinion of web browsing speeds with CDMA vs GSM with respect to the performance of the Blazer browser? Is the browser still going to even things out, or will CDMA seem way faster with the faster processor? In my view, the faster connection is the *only* thing going for Sprint, whereas there are several things going for GSM.
  3. #23  
    I'm a little worried that Sprint doesn't realize what they have in the Treo 600. The rep at MP said that they price PPCs higher because PPC users generally use more data than Palm OS users.

    I think the Treo 600 will be comparable to PPC, in terms of data usage, when enough third-party apps are out for things like streaming audio (& video?). What happens then? Do they raise our prices? Will we be able to remain at $10/month: (i) for the duration of the contract; and (ii) at renewal? (I'm not willing to pay $30/month for unlimited data.) Unfortunately, I received no clear answers from the Sprint rep at MP.
  4. #24  
    Originally posted by Sobakka
    Several people have mentioned overseas travel as a stong argument in favor of GSM. But what does that actually come down to?

    If you have an unlocked phone, which you will not get from TMobile and will cost you an arm and a leg, you can buy prepaid SIMs abroad and plug them in.

    The other option, as I understand it, is to use TMobile's international plan of some variety. Are these extremely expensive? I've heard it's several dollars a minute, depending on the country you're in. What about SMS? Can you take your TMobile phone overseas and just communicate by SMS, avoiding the crazy voice rates?

    And finally, just because you may be able to roam on GSM, doesn't mean GPRS is included. Does TMobile include data in the international plans? Is it possible to have a mobile email device abroad? That would be amazing.

    Does anyone have experience traveling with an older GSM Treo, and can speak to the voice and data roaming issues? SMS is especially interesting, because it would seem like this would be cheap and available.

    If the "international" argument amounts to paying $3 a minute, maybe it's not such a strong one, and you're best getting a local phone...
    Intentionally or not, your post projects both ignorance and attitude.

    Whatever you may say about international GSM, it exists; you cannot even use a CDMA phone in Mexico, much less all of Europe, most of Africa, and most of the far east.

    I will likely get an unlocked phone in any case but I do not switch SIMS nearly so often as I switch phones. There is value in it only if you are going to make a lot of local calls in the destination country.

    Incidentally, I do carry a Sprint SIM. Yes, you read it right. Call them and ask them. They will sell you one. You can put it in a GSM phone and get calls on your Sprint number and make them on your Sprint account. Of course, it is at least as expensive as using my own GSM phone on standard GSM roaming. You can only save money by getting a local SIM on local air time and local calls.

    It is true that you cannot get GPRS every place that you can get GSM, only in about two out of three, about a hundred more countries than you can get voice or data with Sprint. You may have to choose among local carriers to get to one that supports GPRS but this is trivial. Frankly, I have never bothered to check if or how much I pay for GPRS outside the US because I do not care.

    It may amaze you but it is not "amazing" that I can check e-mail internationally. I can do that whether or not I have GPRS. It is certainly slower and more expensive if I have to use a dial connection but cheap at the price.

    Yes, I have traveled extensively with my Treo 270. Both incoming and outgoing calls are easy. I know that on getting off the plane in Taiwan, I got my normal SMS message reminding me to check voice mail. I had done so before reaching passport control. In the context of a plane ticket and hotels, the last thing I am going to worry about is the cost of completing a call. Only someone who has never tried to make and pay for a call from a European or Asian hotel room would even raise the question. If you are worried about cheap, you may not be a 600 customer at all but I can tell you that using my Treo trumps any other way of completing a call in Asia or Europe for both cost and convenience. It may not be as cheap as using T-Mobile or Sprint at home but it is no worse than the alternative.

    The cost is more a function of the fact that you are paying for local airtime on a per minute basis and that you are making an international call than that you are a T-Mobile or GSM customer. If you think that there is a cheaper or more convenient way to complete that call than standard GSM, you are kidding yourself. If you pay $3 per minute, it is because that is what the call costs, however you make it.

    Incidentally, T-Mobile's International rates are standard GSMA rates. http://www.gsmworld.com/index.shtml It is true that T-Mobile does not provide International dialing or roaming by default; you must ask for it and you may have to have a second credit check but it is not a "plan." It is simply a business issue. If you complete any call off the T-Mobile network, they are going to owe someone money. It is simply a matter of being sure that they are going to be reimbursed.
    http://www.t-obile.com/international/coverage.asp

    In short, if you travel internationally more than a trip or two a year, go GSM; it is a no brainer.
  5. Rocklin's Avatar
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    #25  
    OK, I know that everyone says that Sprint is faster than the others. Does this mean it is "substancially" faster? I read all about the speeds, but can not equate to them. Is the difference so great that I might get "bored" while waiting for a non-sprint connection? Or is the difference only "slightly" noticeable?
  6. OJM
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    #26  
    Quick tidbit - I have used my SPCS phone in Mexico.
    OJMBrooklyn

    SPHi300>T300>T600>T650>PPC6700>700WX
  7. #27  
    Lord knows I deserved that. I am so ashamed.


    Originally posted by whmurray


    Intentionally or not, your post projects both ignorance and attitude.
  8. #28  
    The SIM card is the best invention since the wheel... Or something like that I will stick with GSM! m00se
    I have never let my schooling interfere with my education.
    -Mark Twain
  9. jhetzel's Avatar
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    #29  
    Just for Informational purposes, T-Mobile will unlock a new users (in good standing) phone after 3 months of service. Additionally, T-Mobile does offer GPRS international roaming in many countries. See http://t-mobile.com/international/
    Tell a man there are 300 billion stars in the universe and he'll believe you. Tell him a bench has wet paint on it and he'll have to touch to be sure.

    Check out my crazy Golden Retrievers!
  10. #30  
    Originally posted by OJM
    Quick tidbit - I have used my SPCS phone in Mexico.
    I assume that your phone is tri-mode and that you were really using analog rather than digital. I have tried to use my dual-band sprint PCS phone in Mexico with no success. (If I spoke Spanish, I might have been successful. However, when I use GSM, it is just like being at home.)

    None of this applies to a Treo 600 CDMA phone. As I understand it, the 600 CDMA does not include analog backup.

    Mexico is a special case. There really is a little PCS in Mexico and there is not much more GSM in Mexico. Neither 600 is likely to work well there. That leaves the rest of the world where GSM works transparently and PCS not at all.
  11. dsdxp's Avatar
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    #31  
    Originally posted by RMitch
    Sprint does not allow anyone to get unlimitted vision service for $7.50 on any pda or phone with modem capabilities. You then have to pay their rate starting at $40 for 20Mb.
    This is incorrect. The MB plans are only for the laptop / PDA card modems. The PDA phones are treated exactly as a regular phone is treated when it comes to adding PCS Vision onto your plan. It's $15 more per month if it's being added onto the main line on the account (or the only line). It's $7.50 per month for each additional line on a family shared plan.
    Not all treasure is silver and gold.
  12. #32  
    Originally posted by DSDxp


    This is incorrect. The MB plans are only for the laptop / PDA card modems. The PDA phones are treated exactly as a regular phone is treated when it comes to adding PCS Vision onto your plan. It's $15 more per month if it's being added onto the main line on the account (or the only line). It's $7.50 per month for each additional line on a family shared plan.
    I use my Treo to connect my PC to the Internet (using PDAnet software) at a reported 9600. I use the same SIM card in my Merlin Card to connect to the Internet at a reported 56K. Both are within my plan. I pay $20 for 20meg per month and do not go over. I believe that there is now an unlimited plan at about the same price.
  13.    #33  
    OK - I'm tending to go to Sprint. Both Sprint and T-Mo have similar costs on data plans - is their any other factor not to go with Sprint besides the fact it will be a Sprint locked phone??? Besides ending up with a GSM phone to "possibly" switch carriers in the future, is their any other reason to choose T-MO?
    Thanks.
  14. #34  
    It really depends on where you live and the coverage offered that may differ. I know Cingular is moving towards GSM hence the new T600 for them. BUT they honestly told me it is in the early stages. With CDMA sprint locked or not you will have more coverage between Sprints network and VzW's network and whoever else you can roam onto with a CDMA Phone. I just wish there was one world standard or at least a way to cross the lines without changing hardware everytime.
  15. #35  
    So here's the real question: has it been confirmed that the Treo 600 can act as a modem for, say, a laptop? If so, what 'dialup' speeds does it reach?

    I'd be sorely tempted to pick up this phone, then dump my landline and ISP, if I can use it for dialup access when needed. (Of course, cable modem comes later. )
    What does this button do?
  16. #36  
    Originally posted by Kesh
    So here's the real question: has it been confirmed that the Treo 600 can act as a modem for, say, a laptop? If so, what 'dialup' speeds does it reach?

    I'd be sorely tempted to pick up this phone, then dump my landline and ISP, if I can use it for dialup access when needed. (Of course, cable modem comes later. )
    I cannot guarantee it. What I can tell you is that I use my Treo 270 as a modem for my PC all the time. It indicates that it is connected at 9.6k. That is slower than GPRS works on the same SIM and account on the Treo itself or my Merlin 100 PCMCIA card. This card indicates that it is connected at 56K.
  17. #37  
    Originally posted by Kesh
    So here's the real question: has it been confirmed that the Treo 600 can act as a modem for, say, a laptop? If so, what 'dialup' speeds does it reach?

    I'd be sorely tempted to pick up this phone, then dump my landline and ISP, if I can use it for dialup access when needed. (Of course, cable modem comes later. )
    There is WirelessModem which works for the 600 connection speeds on it go up to 112kbps thats because no one has written a Win XP/NT/2K/ME driver yet....but when they do speeds will increase to approx. 1 Mbps...which is pretty fast seeing as how a lot of people are using 56k modems. 112kbps isnt bad though you can go grab a soda from the fridge and coem back and it'll be done assuming you're sitting in the dining room...
    Treo 300, Treo 600 - Sprint

    I dream in code and TCP/IP sequence numbers.
  18. #38  
    and dont replace your ISP with it...thats why we experience dropped calls signal fades and errors that say "unable to connect to the network. data is busy or unavailable."use it once in awhile for checking mail on the road or something but if yopu replace it as ur ISP sprint will cut you off from unlimited vision and its back to 39 cents a kb for you.
    Treo 300, Treo 600 - Sprint

    I dream in code and TCP/IP sequence numbers.
  19. #39  
    Originally posted by SprintTreo600
    and dont replace your ISP with it...thats why we experience dropped calls signal fades and errors that say "unable to connect to the network. data is busy or unavailable."use it once in awhile for checking mail on the road or something but if yopu replace it as ur ISP sprint will cut you off from unlimited vision and its back to 39 cents a kb for you.
    Who said I was going to use Sprint?

    But, good point. I suppose the cellular infrastructure can't handle that much data use yet. Oh well.
    What does this button do?
  20. #40  
    Instead of posting a new thread, I'll post my concerns here.

    I've been a Sprint customer since around 1997. Soon after, I got married, so we put the account in my husband's name and did my phone as an add-a-phone.

    Recently I have been unable to log into Vision with my 300 if I'm within 50 miles of Austin. I log in just fine outside the area. I spoke to tier 2 support who told me to exchange the phone at a local store. I called the store to make sure I could do this, and they told me it was fine and to come in and do it.

    When I got there, they told me they would not exchange the phone. The counter person asked around to the women in the store to find out who I'd talked to who told me to come exchange. When nobody on the floor said she'd talked to me, he implied I was lying. When I asked to speak to the manager, she basically told me I was free to take my business elsewhere. Keep in mind I didn't yell or cuss, just explained I was unhappy.

    I called *2 and asked for retention. The person refused to transfer me because my account "is not highly valued enough".

    This experience with customer service has made me ponder TMobile. Here are my concerns:

    - The 'network busy' 0x1102 error. Does it happen w/TMobile? I haven't been able to connect to Vision in Austin for weeks.
    - Using Wireless Modem while out of town, my connection drops every 5 minutes on Sprint. Better w/TMo?
    - Roaming. I've seen differing opinions as to whether you will be able to roam on TMo in a non-red area (from their map). If I go to Wyoming or South Dakota, for example, will I be able to place calls?

    If TMo looks like a good fit for us, hub's going to switch over as soon as number portability is available. Despite my only paying $6/month, Sprint apparently doesn't realize that alienating the wife is likely to upset the husband as well.
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