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  1.    #1  
    Mossberg loves the Treo 600. You can read the review here, when it is released:

    http://ptech.wsj.com/ptech.html

    I think so, at least.

    For those of you with subscriptions to their site (a very excellent one, if I may plug it here--includes Barrons!):

    New Treo 600 Rules, With Bright Screen And Long Battery Life
  2. #2  
    Originally posted by KRamsauer
    Mossberg loves the Treo 600. You can read the review here, when it is released:

    http://ptech.wsj.com/ptech.html

    I think so, at least.
    did we have any doubt that he would love it? :-)

    the above site updates on thursdays, so we dont have long to wait to read it.
    Felipe
    On the road to 5,000 posts
    Life is what happens between Firmware releases.
  3.    #3  
    hehe, you responded quick! I get alerts for this column sent to my email address (and with a tap in the new snappermail, I was reading the whole column before I got off the plane. I need a new Treo WHY? : ).

    I don't know if you've read the review, but it's OVER THE TOP! He mentions a few negative things, but for the most part he trips over himself to praise the device. One thing I didn't like was the CDMA version is going to have significantly less talk time than the GSM.
  4. #4  
    no, I haven't read it yet, but will as soon at is is posted.

    did you get the column from wall street journal or the ptech site?
    Felipe
    On the road to 5,000 posts
    Life is what happens between Firmware releases.
  5.    #5  
    I read it on the WSJ site proper.
  6. #6  
    You can read it now, and it's certainly gushing! I really just can't wait any longer for this device to come out.
  7. #7  
    ".... and it blows away any of the PDA/phones based on Microsoft's Pocket PC operating system."

    That comment would probably touch the nerve of one guy who frequent this board.
  8. purpleX
    purpleX's Avatar
    #8  
    Mossberg is one of PPC crowd favorite punching bag, followed by WaPosh Pegoraro. But Pegoraro is so bad, even Sony quits giving him review unit. But it's all cooling now, I don't think anybody will link up mossberg review like it used to. He is not as edgy about PPC anymore. His PPC comment has gotten pretty bland. Too bad, it was such a fun poking fun of his column.
  9. #9  
    The Sprint model can send and receive data about 30% faster than the versions for Orange, Cingular and T-Mobile. But the GSM versions get about 50% more battery life and can be used both in the U.S. and Europe.
    Well that's a pretty significant isn't it...
    _________________
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    Current device: Palm Pre
    Device graveyard: Palm Vx, Cassiopeia E100, LG Phenom HPC, Palm M515, Treo 300, Treo 600, Treo 650, Treo 700p, Axim X50v, Treo 800w



    Please don't PM me about my avatar. For more info go here.

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  10. #10  
    it needs a voice recorder, walt!
  11. #11  
    New Treo 600 Rules,
    With Bright Screen
    And Long Battery Life


    PERSONAL TECHNOLOGY: By WALTER S. MOSSBERG

    Handspring has done it again. In 2001, the little company introduced the best combination phone, PDA and e-mail device on the market, the Treo. Now, Handspring has topped itself with its all-new version, the Treo 600.

    Sprint will start selling the Treo 600 in the U.S. by mid-October for $500 to $550. In Europe, the wireless-phone carrier Orange is also about to start selling it as well. Handspring expects to offer Treo 600s that can be used on the Cingular and T-Mobile networks a few weeks after the Sprint model makes its debut, and may sell it for AT&T customers later in the year.

    I've been carrying a Sprint Treo 600 around for a couple of weeks and I love it. It's a great phone, an excellent mobile e-mail terminal and a full-fledged Palm-compatible PDA. I prefer it to any RIM BlackBerry model I have tested, and it blows away any of the PDA/phones based on Microsoft's Pocket PC operating system.

    As good as the original Treo was, it had several flaws. First, it looked more like a PDA than a phone. Second, its battery life was barely adequate, at 2.5 to three hours of talk time. Third, its screen was too dim to be seen well outdoors. And fourth, its memory couldn't be expanded.

    The Treo 600 resolves all of those concerns. It's narrower and there's no longer a lid to protrude, so the device looks much more natural and phone-like against the ear. Also, battery life has been drastically improved. The Sprint model will get four to five hours of talk time and the model for the other carriers, which use a lower-power radio technology, will get six to seven hours.

    The new Treo's color screen is much brighter than before -- in fact it's the brightest I've ever seen on a hand-held device. And the Treo 600 now has a memory expansion slot that accepts the popular SD memory cards used in digital cameras and music players.

    Speaking of which, the Treo 600 has an MP3 music player and a built-in digital camera. The music function is startlingly good, better than on any standard phone I've tested. It has a separate speaker optimized for music. The camera, like most on cellphones, is low-resolution and lacks a flash. Some of the indoor shots I took were very poor, but most of my test pictures were fine for e-mailing.

    Unlike the older Treo, this new model can be operated most of the time with just one hand. A new five-way control pad and rewritten software combine to make it unnecessary most of the time to take out the stylus and tap on the screen.

    There is still a full keyboard for typing e-mails, memos and other data. It's narrower than in the original Treo, but the keys have domed tops that help compensate for their closer spacing. I found I could type quickly and with few typos on the new keyboard. But at least one woman who tried my test Treo 600 hated the keyboard, saying it was incompatible with long nails.

    I was able to run my favorite hand-held e-mail program, SnapperMail, which can automatically fetch and send your e-mail from standard Internet e-mail services as often as you like. Handspring has its own new, free e-mail program that will be available on most versions of the Treo 600, and Sprint is providing its own e-mail program and service.

    I also tested several other third-party Palm programs, including games, and all ran perfectly. I was able to synchronize the calendar and address book with my Windows PC, and the Treo 600 is also Mac compatible.

    The built-in Web browser has been rewritten for greater speed and compatibility. It can now download programs and other files, such as ring tones for the phone, direct to the device without first loading them onto a PC.

    Everything feels much faster, especially the processing of e-mail and Web pages. That's because the Treo 600 has a much faster processor than the old model and double the internal memory.

    There are some differences between the Sprint model, which runs on the cellphone technology called CDMA, and the other models that run on the GSM technology. The Sprint model can send and receive data about 30% faster than the versions for Orange, Cingular and T-Mobile. But the GSM versions get about 50% more battery life and can be used both in the U.S. and Europe.

    The Sprint and Orange models are a dark charcoal-gray color, while the models Handspring will sell to Cingular and T-Mobile users are silver-colored.

    There are a few drawbacks to the Treo 600. It's a little thicker and heavier than the earlier model. Also, the screen, while very bright, is low in resolution, or sharpness, compared with the latest screens offered by competing PDAs.

    Finally, in an effort to simplify the phone function, Handspring has made it harder to get to the Treo's excellent speed-dial screens. The company says it will eventually provide options to reverse these changes.

    Still, the Treo 600 is a big step forward for the wireless PDA. It is Handspring's last product as an independent company, because Palm is absorbing both the company and the Treo product line early next year. Palm intends to continue to develop the line. It's a great way for Handspring to exit the stage.

    Write to Walter S. Mossberg at mossberg@wsj.com

    Updated September 18, 2003
  12. #12  
    For giving the rest of us the heads-up, Kurt and a huge thanks to WeeBit for posting it ... less time for us going to get the article leaves more time to drool over what we can't have yet. But got my credit card ready to go.

    Loved what he had to say about PPC ... but Pa1mOne needs to keep paddling to stay ahead of the M$ wave ... they have the cash to spend.

    All I can say is, Surf's up, Dude (and Dudettes)! Can't wait to catch the Treo 600 wave!
  13. #13  
    > ...But at least one woman who tried my test Treo 600 hated
    > the keyboard, saying it was incompatible with long nails...

    Geeks rule!

    They don't worry about their long fingernails and keyboards!

    Same customers who bought the other TREOs are going to buy this TREO.

    ====

    BTW - isn't it sorta like...you know...a copyright violation to include the ENTIRE text of a commercial article? Perhaps TreoCentral should remove the text of the above violating-message and put the link in? Here's the link:

    -- http://ptech.wsj.com/ptech.html
  14. #14  
    Originally posted by SeldomVisitor
    ...
    Same customers who bought the other TREOs are going to buy this TREO.
    ...
    Yes, they will, and so will MANY new customers

    Sure, it may be hard to use it with long finger nails, but if it's a hit with the target segment except for those with finger nails, it's still a damn good hit.
  15. #15  
    "(Treo 600) blows away any of the PDA/phones based on Microsoft's Pocket PC operating system. -Walt Mossberg

    I am glad to hear Walt agree about the M$ products being junk and how great the Treo 600 is!

    Jake
    There is a great difference between knowing and understanding. You can know a lot about something without understanding it. —Charles Kettering
    -------------------------------------------------
    Treo 600: Love at First Sight by Jake Ehrlich

    Thoughts on the Future of Handheld Computing: A 5 Part Series by Jake Ehrlich
  16. #16  
    Originally posted by WeeBitObsessed
    New Treo 600 Rules,
    With Bright Screen
    And Long Battery Life


    PERSONAL TECHNOLOGY: By WALTER S. MOSSBERG

    Handspring expects to offer Treo 600s that can be used on the Cingular and T-Mobile networks a few weeks after the Sprint model makes its debut, and may sell it for AT&T customers later in the year.
    what the hell????
    the GSM treo will not be out until a few weeks after the Sprint model makes its debut>>>>.....
    aren't thay supposed to be out togather....
  17. #17  
    Originally posted by KRamsauer
    One thing I didn't like was the CDMA version is going to have significantly less talk time than the GSM.
    Some people are hard to satisfy. While it is true that he said that the CDMA model will have shorter battery life than the GSM, he noted that the trade-off was 30% faster data rate. You pays your dollar and you takes your choice. I lived with the battery life of the 270 for two years. While I plan to choose GSM I could live with the CDMA to get faster data.
  18. #18  
    > Yes, they will, and so will MANY new customers ...

    Mossberg was gushy over the TREO 180 as well:

    -- http://ptech.wsj.com/archive/ptech-20011129.html

    yet of the first 47,000 or so that were shipped, only 13,000 sold.

    It ended up being an amazing financial failure because, as Handspring management put it, only "early adopters" (i.e., geeks like TreoCentral readers!) bought it.

    As a $500 phone with (full) PDA features, the TREO 600 will sell to exactly the same customer set.
  19. #19  
    Originally posted by SeldomVisitor
    > Yes, they will, and so will MANY new customers ...

    Mossberg was gushy over the TREO 180 as well:

    -- http://ptech.wsj.com/archive/ptech-20011129.html

    yet of the first 47,000 or so that were shipped, only 13,000 sold.

    It ended up being an amazing financial failure because, as Handspring management put it, only "early adopters" (i.e., geeks like TreoCentral readers!) bought it.

    As a $500 phone with (full) PDA features, the TREO 600 will sell to exactly the same customer set.
    I disagree. The two situations are VERY different. It's not like Walt's review is the only indicator. Here are a few very significant differences:

    - The device is very different from the previous generation.
    - The price is very different. I don't believe the $500-$550 figure. The European prices were reported to be less and the unlocked GSM version is reported to be < $500. It was $700 for the 270. Indications point to HS learning the lesson about price.
    - The marketing being done is very different.
    - Carrier backing is very different.
    - The market has been maturing.

    So to equate the two situations only because Walt loved both is way too simplistic.
  20. purpleX
    purpleX's Avatar
    #20  
    From several top problems that prevent treo becoming mainstream HS only address one of them, the form factor. From the review it is clear it has not tackle price, battery, and usability. It is still a PDA trying hard to be a phone, which is so far a guarantee niche market.

    It's not clear yet, what is the shape of perfect smartphone, but shrunken PDA is a guarantee loser. It combines the worst of two world, a compromised PDA and a mediocre phone. The casualty list is getting longer: nokia 9000, XDA, p800, treo 180/270. And probably we can add XDAII, treo 600 and p810.

    I don't think 600 design is radical enough to break the mainstream acceptance. A test of a good handheld phone is easy. If you hand the device to a random girl in coffe shop, and she would say...eww... I can't make a phone call with it. Then it's a guarantee market failure by phone market standard. It is important for a handphone to 'look like' a phone, but at the same time interesting enough to be a personal attire. Nokia nails this. The problem now is of course how to add all those PDA functionality without turning the phone into a monstrosity or compromising the PDA functionality to cute gimmick.

    Treo 600 fails. It is not an attractive phone for the mass, nor has big enough spec to compete with other high end PDAs. Consequently the market will be very limited.
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