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  1. #21  
    cant wait 4 O2 n car phone warhouse to stock it

    handspring are silly as the only places u could get a treo 90 180 or 270 was O2 or vodafone

    i for 1 am not moving to orange just for the phone i do not like orange
  2. #22  
    Shall we get the eggs?



  3.    #23  
    Hmmm ..
    let's see tomorrow's press first.

    (slightly worried!)
  4. #24  
    worry not, it's 10:57pm est and the Register storie posted states that you were right.
  5. #25  
    What is a product "Launch" with out a product shipping or a specified date the product could be purchased?

    Pricing is new, and a few new features (backup and restore over the network), but I was hoping that the launch would include at best immediate availability of the 600, or at least a specific date of availability.

    Instead it sounds like something we already knew: Orange would be selling a Treo 600 sometime this fall.

    Just my opinion.
  6. #26  
    The webmaster of PDAFrance was yesterday Tuesday 16th in London for a presentation of the Treo 600 by Orange.
    http://www.pdafrance.com/articles/news50.php
    Look at the article titled "Apple Expo et Treo 600", dated 15 of September.
    After a few words about Apple expo, it says : " [...] Par contre, notez que je ne ferais pas la première journée de Apple Expo (demain), car je serais à Londres pour la prprpré$sentation$ $officielle$ $du$ $Orange$ $Tr$é$o$ $600$ $tournant$ $sous$ $Palm$ $OS$. $Comptez$ $sur$ $moi$ $pour$ $quelques$ $photos$ $et$ $mes$ $impressions$ $du$ $produit$ [...]&$quot$;

    Approximative translation : "[...] However, note that I won't be in the first day in Apple Expo (Sptember 16) because I'll be in London for the official introduction of Palm-OS based Orange Treo 600. Be sure I'll take a few pictures and give my feelings about this product [...]"

    Be sure this is a reliable source.
    TreoBuddy
    TreoFrance , la première communauté francophone entièrement dédiée au Treo
  7. #27  
    Here's the new thread

    Confusedvorlon, you can have your eggs for breakfast, not in the face !
    TreoBuddy
    TreoFrance , la première communauté francophone entièrement dédiée au Treo
  8. #28  
    CONFUSED>>>>>> CONSIDER YOURSELF VINDICATED

    http://discussion.treocentral.com/tc...-t36099/s.html
  9. #29  
    ConfusedV,

    Thank you for heads up. My doubts have now been erased...Although I'm a bit confused as to how they can call it a product "launch" when the product isn't yet shipping, but hey at least we're a step closer.

    Your credibility is now confirmed.
    --Inspector Gadget

    "Go Go Gadget Pre!!"
    Palm Pre on Sprint

    Palm V--> Palm IIIc--> Visor Prism--> Visor Phone--> Treo 270--> Treo 600--> Treo 650-->
    Treo 700wx--> HTC Touch Diamond--> Palm Pre & HTC EVO 4G.
  10. #30  
    Originally posted by Kilted_One
    handspring are silly as the only places u could get a treo 90 180 or 270 was O2 or vodafone
    only in the UK. Here in Germany O2 doesn't offer any treo although they were the only ones to present it at CeBIT 2002 (?)...

    Hopefully, they'll offer the treo 600, but I doubt it.

    andreas
    treopolis -the German treo site

    Now in beta testing: treopolis 2.0
  11. #31  
    This is awesome! Good work confusedv!

    But again... Palm and Handspring are both U.S. companies. Why do they launch their hot new product in the European market first instead of the U.S.? Do you guys think there is a good strategic reason for this? If anything, I would have thought that Sprint would have had the first go at the Treo 600.
    RayUSA

    "The future will be better tomorrow."
    - Dan Quayle
  12. #32  
    Just a small joke (see attached pic)
    Attached Images Attached Images
    TreoBuddy
    TreoFrance , la première communauté francophone entièrement dédiée au Treo
  13. #33  
    Very reliable source. No phones selling in any shops just yet folks... "possibly in a couple of weeks" (talking Europe here).
    www.gsmworld.com
  14. #34  
    Originally posted by RayUSA
    This is awesome! Good work confusedv!

    But again... Palm and Handspring are both U.S. companies. Why do they launch their hot new product in the European market first instead of the U.S.? Do you guys think there is a good strategic reason for this? If anything, I would have thought that Sprint would have had the first go at the Treo 600.
    Well, I can't say for certain, but my opinion is that the European market is more mature when it comes to cellular usage. They have one standard (GSM) and the market isn't as cluttered.

    They don't have the FCC getting in the way, either (although I'm sure there is some European equivalent). I'm not surprised that Handspring would launch it first in Europe.

    The U.S. is a different market to be sure. Handspring may be a U.S. company, but if history teaches us anything, it's that the U.S. is fast to invent neat technologies, but very slow in implementing them. Look how long it has taken for High Definition TV and digital broadcasting to get here. They've been doing it in other parts of the world for nearly a decade or longer.

    I think it all comes down to marketability and acceptance. Other parts of the world seem to jump into new technology or even if it's not really "new" they adopt new ways of thinking (such as using SMS/MMS to its potential). The U.S. market hardly uses SMS/MMS. Why is that?

    Europe already has 3G networks. The U.S. is still trying to get it off the ground. (We have the technology...but because we haven't figured out how to make immediate profits from it, we haven't committed the resources to roll it out in a timely manner.)

    And then there is the American mindset: "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." Americans hate "change". We're lazy. If it means we have to learn something new, we'd rather not bother. (Hence the reason we haven't converted to System International--metric.) Heaven forbid that we use a compatible or world-recognized system.

    When it comes to technology standards we're quick to invent our own (so we can patent it and make the most money from it by licensing it to others.)

    But it's not all bad... Part of what makes the U.S. a great place is the freedom to do our own thing. Innovation thrives in that environment. Too bad that we take forever to go from innovation to implementation (mainly because of greed). Everyone involved in the process has to figure out how to get their piece of the pie.

    Bureaucracy can clog up even the most well-oiled machine. The U.S. market is full of it.
    --Inspector Gadget

    "Go Go Gadget Pre!!"
    Palm Pre on Sprint

    Palm V--> Palm IIIc--> Visor Prism--> Visor Phone--> Treo 270--> Treo 600--> Treo 650-->
    Treo 700wx--> HTC Touch Diamond--> Palm Pre & HTC EVO 4G.
  15. #35  
    Originally posted by Insp_Gadget

    But it's not all bad... Part of what makes the U.S. a great place is the freedom to do our own thing. Innovation thrives in that environment.
    First, you're right. The european market (and most of the rest of the world) is GSM. This means a couple of things:
    1) Customers don't have to worry about which network to get if the want to use it in X place. Buy a GSM phone, it'll work anywhere in Europe, and most of the rest of the world. It also means a large market for Handspring.

    2) Instead of mobile phone companies trying to convince customers that their "air protocol" is "better", the mobile phone companies have been competing on price and extra services.

    3) I think you're right that "freedom to innovate" is a good thing, but it's not uniquely American.

    The immaturaty of US mobile networks is due to a refusal to dictate a basic infrastructure.

    Can you imagine if every TV station was free to broadcast using it's own television format. (Well, you want to watch NBC, you'll need an NTSC television. ABC?, well, better get a dual-format TV then so you can watch ABC-TSC. It's a different format you know...) It's ubsurd, but that's essentially what US mobile phone customers are faced with.

    And of course, if the government hadn't funded the development of TCP/IP and decided to use it as a standard, we'd still be in the dark ages of Compuserve and Prodigy.

    My point? Sometimes government imposed standards are a good thing. It leads to competition on things that actually benefit consumers (price and features), rather than things that benefit suppliers (CDMA license fees to Qualcomm.)
  16. #36  
    Originally posted by melevittfl


    ...snip...
    2) Instead of mobile phone companies trying to convince customers that their "air protocol" is "better", the mobile phone companies have been competing on price and extra services.

    3) I think you're right that "freedom to innovate" is a good thing, but it's not uniquely American.

    The immaturaty of US mobile networks is due to a refusal to dictate a basic infrastructure.

    Can you imagine if every TV station was free to broadcast using it's own television format. (Well, you want to watch NBC, you'll need an NTSC television. ABC?, well, better get a dual-format TV then so you can watch ABC-TSC. It's a different format you know...) It's ubsurd, but that's essentially what US mobile phone customers are faced with.

    ...snip...
    Excellent points. The competition between carriers in the U.S. market is definately diluted by the differences in their networks. GSM vs CDMA has been a long-standing argument even in these forums.

    Carriers like T-Mobile have to fight for market share on two fronts:

    - Coverage--Verizon inherited the majority of the analog/digital wireless towers throughout the country, thus getting market share by default due to the coverage they have (Much like Microsoft).

    - Standards--The U.S. market's use of CDMA (although GSM is gaining in popularity) is one of the things that has made it harder for other carriers to get market penetration in the U.S. It doesn't seem to matter if those other carriers offer service for less...Until the service is located everywhere that CDMA is located, they will have an uphill climb.

    These two things are in the way. Instead of Verizon, T-Mobile, Sprint, etc. focusing on bringing innovative services to the masses, they're busy just trying to extend the reach of their respective networks. They each work in a vacuum developing what might be innovative features, but the features only work on their individual network.

    Oh well...Maybe some day compatibility will get higher priority.

    BTW, I didn't mean to imply that "freedom to innovate" was uniquely American, if that's how I came across.
    --Inspector Gadget

    "Go Go Gadget Pre!!"
    Palm Pre on Sprint

    Palm V--> Palm IIIc--> Visor Prism--> Visor Phone--> Treo 270--> Treo 600--> Treo 650-->
    Treo 700wx--> HTC Touch Diamond--> Palm Pre & HTC EVO 4G.
  17. #37  
    Originally posted by Insp_Gadget


    Well, I can't say for certain...

    ...lots and lots and lots of now deleted stuff was here...

    ...The U.S. market is full of it.
    Maybe another reason is, release it to the Europeans first, let them find the big issues, fix 'em and then give the Americans the good version.

    That would be my plan if I was American but I'm originally English which should give me half a reason to smile given Orange's announcement today , however, I now live in Australia where I am likely to have a Phantom V before I get a T600 .
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