Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 41
  1.    #1  
    Hello all, I am new to this forum and apologize if this question has been answered previously.

    I am currently a GSM user on T-Mo. For the most part, I like the service. My biggest complaint has been weak building penetration and occasional areas without coverage.

    I have made the decision to purchase the Treo 600 when it is released later this year.

    My question is whether to sign up with Sprint or just purchase a GSM model and stick with T-Mobile.

    What are the advantages/disadvantages to using either Sprint or the GSM model?

    would one be faster on data than the other.

    Thanks for you input
  2. #2  
    I have found in my own uses GSM seems to get through a building just a tad better than CDMA (Sprint). This has to do with the way CDMA data packets travel (grouped together instead of in 'bits'.

    Of course, the bigger problem is the frequency (1900mhz). If you moved to a provider that operated on 850mhz, you'd likely see better building penetration.
    I want a Treo 600!!!
  3. MrH
    MrH is offline
    MrH's Avatar
    Posts
    39 Posts
    #3  
    I can't speak for T-Mobile but GSM 850MHz should fix the in-building coverage problems.

    Since the Treo 600 GSM version is quad band (North America: 850MHz, 1900MHz & Europe:900MHz, 1800MHz) I'm planning on picking one of those up. At least if the unit is unlocked (or if you have it unlocked) you can move it around to different providers, unlike the CDMA version.
  4.    #4  
    I am assuming that the Treo 600 will support both 1900 and 850 frequencies?

    I know that T-Mo does not support 850 but Cingular does?

    I did not think there were very many places using 850 at present.
  5. MrH
    MrH is offline
    MrH's Avatar
    Posts
    39 Posts
    #5  
    Originally posted by MrSteve
    I am assuming that the Treo 600 will support both 1900 and 850 frequencies?

    I know that T-Mo does not support 850 but Cingular does?

    I did not think there were very many places using 850 at present.
    I can't speak for any of the US Providers but I know that in Canada that Rogers AT&T Wireless has been implimenting GSM850 for quite some time now. Mostly in rural areas to begin with but in Q1 of 04 we're supposed to see GSM850 in Toronto to aid in capacity.

    IIRC, GSM850 was created due to the coverage/penetration problems that AT&T and Rogers were having when they started the large scale addition of GSM to their existing TDMA networks. The rural towers were usually running TDMA800 and the GSM1900 signal was having trouble getting through obsticals and providing reliable service between towers.

    So for what you should be concerned with I'd just recommend sticking with GSM and finding a provider that provides the best coverage wherever you are located and where ever you use the unit the most. After being with every company we have around Toronto, and coming back from a lengthy trip to europe and seeing their systems there is no 100% perfect wireless coverage IMO.

    M@
  6. #6  
    AT&T wireless has begun to sell only multi-band devices and will be adding 850 mhz to their networks. For them, it is also a bandwidth availability licensing issue. GSM networks will all be continually upgrading and improving over the next few years both in terms of footprint and in density of existing covered areas. In order to be competitive, they have to. I expect to see a merger among 2 or all 3 of these carriers (T-Mobile, AT&T, Cingular) in the near future. The shakeout probably will occur next year after the dust settles down with number portability. Greater churn (turnover) of customers is costly to the carriers and eventually it is going to be a competitive game of who has the best coverage size and density which is how it should be IMO.

    -THP
    Think First, ask questions later!
  7. #7  
    Originally posted by MrSteve
    I am assuming that the Treo 600 will support both 1900 and 850 frequencies?

    I know that T-Mo does not support 850 but Cingular does?

    I did not think there were very many places using 850 at present.
    ATT and Cingular are migrating GSM to 850 as they migrate away from TDMA. They are reallocating the spectrum there. The Treo supports four bands...850,900,1800 and 1900. In terms of building penetration Sprint is not up to par. The best carrier for building penetration IMO is Nextel, followed by Verizon. As time goes on you will see more GSM on 850.


    FS: GSM Treo 600 with Accesories.... here.
  8. #8  
    How is GSM coverage in the US. Coverage is quite good in Canada, but the roaming maps that I have looked at for the US look like Swiss cheese, with large areas not covered by roaming agreements. For example, in Illinois it looks like only Chicago is covered. Is this just that Rogers in Canada has not been able to set up agreements with other providers or is GSM coverage still in its infance stateside?
  9. #9  
    Originally posted by MrSteve

    would one be faster on data than the other.
    Sprint will give you the faster data connections over any of the US GSM providers right now.
  10. #10  
    Originally posted by dmohr
    How is GSM coverage in the US. Coverage is quite good in Canada, but the roaming maps that I have looked at for the US look like Swiss cheese, with large areas not covered by roaming agreements. For example, in Illinois it looks like only Chicago is covered. Is this just that Rogers in Canada has not been able to set up agreements with other providers or is GSM coverage still in its infance stateside?
    GSM coverage is definitely lacking in the US when compared to CDMA, but that's mainly because the GSM carriers like ATT and Cingular didn't get started building their networks until years after Sprint/Verizon had already started building theirs. GSM coverage in the US is constantly growing and I'm sure will be quite good in the not too distant future but as of right now, it still has a lot of ground to make up in the US when compared to the coverage CDMA has.
  11. #11  
    This really comes down to 2 questions:

    Firstly: Currently GSM has lesser coverage than CDMA, but is quite likely to grow faster and surpass CDMA for coverage in the not too distant future.

    Secondly: CDMA is much faster for data transfer (with a couple of quirks). This will be noticeable if you browse a lot. If you are primarily looking for a phone, then this is a secondary or tertiary point.

    Thirdly (I lied up above): Sprint offers unlimited Vision (e.g. data for browsing, e-mail) for $10/month (might be $15/month for new subscribers). Unlimited data on GSM/GPRS tends to cost more (I think T-Mo is $20/month).
  12. #12  
    Is there really a difference in speed if the Treo is NOT used as a modem? I remember reading in a previous thread that 128kbs is for CDMA. But the speed gap over my pokey GPRS is negligible b/c Treo mhz limits on the processor only allow the Blazer to work just so fast, regardless of network choice. true?
  13. MrH
    MrH is offline
    MrH's Avatar
    Posts
    39 Posts
    #13  
    Originally posted by cnlchapman
    Is there really a difference in speed if the Treo is NOT used as a modem? I remember reading in a previous thread that 128kbs is for CDMA. But the speed gap over my pokey GPRS is negligible b/c Treo mhz limits on the processor only allow the Blazer to work just so fast, regardless of network choice. true?
    I'd say that you're partially right.

    Also remember that GPRS has a theoretical max of ~171kbs

    I think your actual throughput would have more to do with the quality of the signal and the use of channels at the tower rather than CPU speed.
  14. #14  
    So, then Sprint really does perform better? I read earlier that Sprint operates 2x to 3x faster as a modem than GPRS. Big time difference. However, the throughput on Blazer was roughly equal. Am I making this up in order to justify my continued use of GPRS with the Treo 600?

    I'd like some advice on the speed of the new device. If Sprint really is faster (noticeable), then I'll deal with the big shortcommings (no true SMS, worse signal at my office) to use a quicker web connection.
  15. #15  
    I don't think you would see as much difference between GPRS and CDMA 1xRTT web browsing as you would downloading files. When I'm retrieving an e-mail with a 1MB attachment that I need to review (using QuickOffice Premier), I would hate for my speed to be any slower than it is already (I use Sprint's Vision -- CDMA -- and my typical download speeds are about 10-12 KB per second). That's my single biggest concern about moving to GSM for the Treo 600.
  16. #16  
    I agree that GSM coverage will continue to increase in the US, but to say it will surpass CDMA is making the assumption that the CDMA carriers will stop building out their networks, and I dont think that will happen. I have a buddy who works in the cell tower business and he tells me that while they are doing some large projects for ATT and Cingular, that Verizon is actually doing more work than the others. I would expect we will see Verizon build out the old analog parts of their network with CDMA in the future. Since Sprint did not have a legacy network to begin with, I think they will rely more on roaming agreements with Verizon and other CDMA carriers to fill in the gaps. Carriers that had analog networks in place already have some of the infrastructure in place (towers, site, etc) to convert to digital (GSM or CDMA). With the current NIBMY attitude, it is pretty difficult to put up a cell tower in many parts of the US.

    Anyone know if 800mHz CDMA is any better at building penetration than 1900?

    One comment about Blazer speed and data thruput. While the most relavant factor for perceived data speed is bandwidth, the CPU speed does matter when using CPU intensive functions like a browser. I have an old HP820 (WinCE device/PDA/Palmtop). It is a cool little "laptop" type device. I can put a 802.11b wireless card in it, and access the internet with it's browser (IE) while connected to a T1. But the browser is VERY slow. There is plenty of bandwidth (1.5 MB to the internet and 11MB wireless), but the CPU is very slow to render the graphics of most web pages. So, CPU speed does matter when using a browser.
    Carl
  17. #17  
    A comparison of bandwidth was made between GPRS Treo 270's and CDMA 1X Treo 300's some months ago here on TreoCentral using the program bmeter. Results were compiled and averaged here. The summary of results said:

    "What I found was that the average speed for Sprint Vision based off of 45 samples was 10.508 KB a second. For reference, a standard 56k dialup modem has a technical limit of 7 KB a second, but generally users only see about 5 as a max. Therefore Sprint Vision on the Treo is about twice the speed of dialup. Compared to GPRS it is 4.5 times faster, and it is 14 times faster than the average CSD (dialup) rate."

    So in practice Sprint Vision users are getting much greater bandwidth than GPRS users. Blazer may end up being a bottleneck that evens out real-world speeds while web browsing, but I would expect that with the upgrade to Blazer 3.0 and with the faster processor in the Treo 600, page rendering will cease to be as big a bottleneck, and we will start to "feel" the difference in bandwidth that we have only "measured" before.
  18. #18  
    Originally posted by MrH

    Also remember that GPRS has a theoretical max of ~171kbs
    That number really isn't valid here. It all depends on how many channels the device supports and for the GSM/GPRS Treo 600, 48kbps will be its max receiving rate.

    The CDMA Treo 600, OTOH, will have no such limitations and be capable of speeds of up to 144kbps. I routinely got speeds of 110+kbps with my Treo 300 on Sprint.
  19. #19  
    It's the SIM card. My vote is for GSM
    I have never let my schooling interfere with my education.
    -Mark Twain
  20. #20  
    Don't forget that with GPRS over GSM, you have to dial up a connection EVERY TIME you want to move data. With Sprint, you can (theoretically) stay connected all day. In reality I usually get bumped off the network after a couple of hours, but it beats having to dial in every time.
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions