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  1.    #1  
    Hi All,
    I love my Treo 300, but am often surprised to lose signal while driving on I95 in the Northeast. Doesn't seem like I should lose a signal within a 15 minute radius from Boston center!

    Anyway, I will need to start doing more international travel and am therefore attracted to the GSM versions and may wait to jump on that Treo 600 bandwagon with a different carrier.

    one thing I find curious about the Treo 300 is it doesn't handle analog signals... so you either have a digital connection or it's gone.... do the GSM versions behave the same way?
    Thanks
    Jeff
  2. #2  
    Originally posted by atvjeff
    ... do the GSM versions behave the same way?
    Thanks
    Jeff
    In a word: Yes.
    --Inspector Gadget

    "Go Go Gadget Pre!!"
    Palm Pre on Sprint

    Palm V--> Palm IIIc--> Visor Prism--> Visor Phone--> Treo 270--> Treo 600--> Treo 650-->
    Treo 700wx--> HTC Touch Diamond--> Palm Pre & HTC EVO 4G.
  3. #3  
    Yes (digital only), but almost all of the "GSM world" is set up with digital-only coverage (okay, Europe has some analog backup) and virtually all GSM phones are digital-only. The US, by virtue of all its wide open spaces, is one of the only places where a digital+analog phone may be needed. So if you are going to a GSM phone, you (and everyone else with a GSM phone) will have to live with digital-only. But at least with a Treo 600 you will have a true quad band world phone that can be used on virtually any GSM network in existence.
  4. #4  
    The CDMA Treo 600 will be dual band digital, 800/1900 mhz. Unlike the 1900 mhz only Treo 300, you'll be able to roam anywhere on Verizon's digital network.
  5. #5  
    GSM is best for international travel CDMA is not. When I use my Treo 270 in Europe when I travel there from the U.S. the signal is pegged about everywhere you go.
  6. #6  
    Originally posted by george_vc
    GSM is best for international travel CDMA is not. When I use my Treo 270 in Europe when I travel there from the U.S. the signal is pegged about everywhere you go.
    Absolutely, most of Europe is almost entirely GSM. CDMA is only prominent in the US, some areas in South America, and some other locations. I don't want to get into the "which is better" debate, but for international users, GSM is clearly the way to go.
  7. #7  
    I travel internationally a lot, too, so I have been considering switching from Sprint to a GSM carrier. Recently, however, I borrowed a friend's T-Mobile GSM phone, and found that there were no GSM signals available at my house (Cingular, AT&T, T-Mobile). Funny, because the Sprint and Verizon signals are fine there. So I can have a phone that works at home or a phone that works on the road, but not both.

    atvjeff...you should check out the GSM signal in the places you travel near home before you make the switch.
  8. #8  
    I ran into the same problem. I have a separate GSM phone and Dutch T-Mobile account for when I'm travelling there. Really a nuisance.

    Geoffrey
  9. #9  
    Originally posted by atvjeff
    Hi All,
    I love my Treo 300, but am often surprised to lose signal while driving on I95 in the Northeast. Doesn't seem like I should lose a signal within a 15 minute radius from Boston center!
    For what it's worth, my Treo 300 works fine on I95 around Boston. I'm getting 0 bars of service in Brookline, but it still works perfectly and clear. What city are you having trouble with? Woburn?

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