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  1.    #1  
    i have a treo 300. i love it but hate the fact that service is lost at certain points along the interstate.
    cdma is faster but does anybody believe that a gsm version would be an overall more valuable phone?
    I know this depends on individual needs. I would put up with gsm if the speed difference is slight, but if its significantly slower, well than that would answer my questions.
    and yes, I do think the gsm version is a helluva lot sharper! what are your thoughts?
  2. #2  
    I'm definitely going to get the GSM "Batman" version. Not only is it better looking, it's much more versatile as well. The GSM is quad-band and is a true world phone, and capable of using SIM cards from different countries when you travel (CDMA is dual-band). The battery on the GSM version also lasts longer than the CDMA.
  3. #3  
    There is hardly any difference in physical appearance between the cdma and the gsma, outside of color. You have probably been looking at the bad fcc pictures.

    Yes the international/ sim aspect of the gsm version is a plus. But I will take almost the 4x difference in bandwidth that the cdma version will offer. GSM offers peak data rates at up to 56k, while 1xrtt can hit 144k. Check this out for a comprhensive speed comparison;

    http://www.treocentral.com/content/Stories/223-2.htm

    It all depends on your needs... But the phones are virtually physically identical.

    -rob
  4. #4  
    If you are at all interested in "location-based services", which utilize GPS satellites, then the CDMA version is the way to go.

    Sprint will soon fire-up their system, and they'll be the first. Sprint's system utilizes "wireless assisted" GPS technology. The phone is a GPS receiver and the network triangulates a position.

    CDMA technology makes this possible and it doesn't work on the US GSM providers networks (AT&T, Cingular or T-Mobile). The GSM providers have opted for a non-handset "solution" for location-based services. Their triangulation-based system does not utilize GPS and is not nearly as accurate as the Sprint solution. The CDMA 600 fortunately has the (Snaptrack) chip in it to take advantage of Sprint's GPS network.

    I don't fully understand all of the possible uses for this technology, but clearly directions to a location, being able to find the closest gas station or Starbucks, will be possible. And, of course, this system allows for the most accurate location when you call 911 from your cell.
  5. dsdxp's Avatar
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    #5  
    I'm definitely going to get the GSM "Batman" version. Not only is it better looking, it's much more versatile as well.



    This is obviously a matter of opinion. I myself woudl go with the CDMA version mainly because of the high speed internet access. I don't think it looks any worse than the GSM verison, in my opinion, it looks better. I like the gun metal color better than the cheap looking silver color (i.e. treo 300).
    Not all treasure is silver and gold.
  6.    #6  
    The comparison data is excellent - thanks rob. with cdma being 4x faster than gsm, more economical w/ vision, and having gps services to be released soon, it looks to me that ill remain on the vision plan.
    if sprint could reach nationwide always on coverage comparable to gprs, I think they'd tip the scales dramatically. the gun grey color, well, maybe it will grow on me. but with sprint's bandwidth speeds, going gsm would be like giving up broadband to go with dialup. I'd have the sharp, sleek, silver, but I'd have sacrificed the more important attribute - especially for info on the go - SPEED! CDMA IT IS. Thanks again everyone. brian
  7. #7  
    Remember, you are probably going to have your phone in some sort of case. And if so, would you even see the color that much? Probably not. Now if the keyboard and screen are dramatically different between the CDMA version and GSM version THEN I would be upset. But I doubt the color will matter much once the thing is in a case.

    I will be getting the CDMA version. I cannot imagine going to a slower data network and I never travel internationally. I have been really happy with the vision data service. I am just crossing my fingers that Sprint doesn't raise the monthly fee for vision...
  8. #8  
    as european resident the answer is obvious. There is not cdma here ;-)
  9. #9  
    Everyone has brought up some good points. Insp_Gadget said it best when he said:

    Well...let's just say that each version has its pluses and minuses. CDMA is faster, but GSM is more widespread for international use. CDMA is used more in the US than GSM, so that's in its favor if you're in the US. Sprint's network doesn't allow calls to come in while you're doing data connections...GSM does. The Sprint version can only "SMS" to other Sprint users...The GSM version can SMS/MMS to everyone else (even internationally).
    I don't think the color difference is a big deal at all. I'd rather go for the one that fits my needs the best.

    I think the GSM version will be the more successful of the two. After all, over 72% of the world market is primarily on the GSM network, including the two largest markets Europe and Asia. Perhaps that's why Handspring is calling the GSM version "Batman" and CDMA is the sidekick boy wonder "Robin."

    Since I do a lot of travelling and need a good versatile world phone more than anything, my money's on GSM! I'll stick with my computer with Broadband for heavy web surfing.
  10. jeeter's Avatar
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    #10  
    I agree with RayUSA that color is not an issue, so the decision needs to be based on something else.

    I was a Sprint customer pre-Treo and at the time their coverage wasn't that good in the Southeast. Now that may have improved by now, but I had other issues that still exist. I am a 270 owner and have service with T-Mobile and I am the only person in my entire building that can get a signal on my mobile phone. There are several types of coverage that don't seem to penetrate this particular building (Nextel, Sprint, Cingular, etc.). I've also noticed this in other large buildings like Sams, Walmart, Home Depot, etc. This problem still exists with Sprint as my family members and many co-workers still subscribe to their services.

    This caused a couple of problems for me:

    1. No way to be reached in case of an emergency
    2. Battery gets drained as phone is constantly searching for service

    Data transfer hasn't been a big issue for me, as I am an infrequent user. I'm sticking with GSM.
    My 2, it's all I can spare
    Treo 270 Treo 600 Treo 700P *** Unmentionable *** Pre {rooted}
  11. #11  
    I do like the characteristics of gsm phones namely the sim cards and european coverage, but I am at the mercy AT&T wireless for now. I have been looking at PDA phones for some time, the HS 270 on T-Mobile, but the lack of coverage out in the styx concerns me (no 911). I am intrigued with the HS 600, but will at least try the GSM version(with AT&T or T-mo). I Assume that T-Mo has better coverage nationwide (with GSM), but AT&T is catching up fast (partnership with cingular). I currently has a TDMA/GSM phone on AT&T and find that GSM works great on highways, but TDMA is better around town. If I had to rely on GSM only that dead spots would kill me.

    I can't wait to try out the HS 600. October is not that far off. A question to those that will buy the GSM version(RayUSA): Which carrier will you choose?
    thanks
  12. #12  
    I love my Treo, and am drooling over the 600...but I can't imagine not having the option of being able to switch the SIM card to something else should I ever want to do so. And as others have said - for those of us who travel outside of the US, CDMA just isn't even an option.
  13.    #13  
    if i was a frequent traveler overseas or in general, there`d be no doubt id go with gsm.

    id struggle with the net speed but id rather have coverage abroad when i needed it... net access during those times takes a backseat to the absolute necessaries... that much is true.

    i think the gsm will be more popular too actually, esp with the younger generation, since fully functional mms and sms capabilities are offered. cdma offers sms,but receive only - this by the way is idiotic, i think. sprint HAS to change this feature! im not sure about mms. in this area, sprint limits how you can do.

    but since im on the east coast, tristate area, for the most part, the choice for me is cdma. but it would sure be nice to have coverage wherever you went. its a tradeoff!
  14. #14  
    I got a 180 about 2 days before I left for Italy. It was amazing there, SMS was seemless. Its pretty nuttie that you just boot up the phone at it, just, works. I don't travel outside the U.S. much, but its nice to know I could.

    I've been thinking about switching to the Sprint version of the 600. Its tempting, but after all this time with GSM, especially SMS, I don't think I can go back to CDMA. (I used to have Verizon).

    I don't care if T-Mobile won't activate the phone. I'll just buy it and switch SIM cards. Try THAT Sprint users!
    -- Go Illini!
  15. #15  
    Hey, everyone... there are trade-offs, advantages, etc. with both technologies. Use whatever solves your needs. I don't think anyone is going to jail for using either CDMA or GSM. As long as both versions are available, it's not a big deal.

    My personal choice is to go with the GSM version simply because it meets my needs. When the technology doesn't meet my needs I will switch to one that does.

    This has been an interesting thread, but let's keep in mind that no matter what carrier or network technology we each choose to use, the Treo 600 can be used on it. That is what we should all celebrate. Not whose carrier is "better" or "worse".

    Stay cool.
    --Inspector Gadget

    "Go Go Gadget Pre!!"
    Palm Pre on Sprint

    Palm V--> Palm IIIc--> Visor Prism--> Visor Phone--> Treo 270--> Treo 600--> Treo 650-->
    Treo 700wx--> HTC Touch Diamond--> Palm Pre & HTC EVO 4G.
  16. #16  
    Originally posted by treobk214
    if sprint could reach nationwide always on coverage comparable to gprs, I think they'd tip the scales dramatically.
    I believe it is generally accepted that overall, there is more 1xRTT coverage in the US than there is GPRS coverage (although I am sure some will disagree). Here is a link comparing Sprint's 1xRTT coverage to ATT's GPRS coverage. Granted, the comparison is done by Sprint so it will obviously be in their favor but take it for what its worth:

    http://www.sprint.com/pcsbusiness/compare/coverage.html
  17. #17  
    Originally posted by Marty1781


    I believe it is generally accepted that overall, there is more 1xRTT coverage in the US than there is GPRS coverage (although I am sure some will disagree). Here is a link comparing Sprint's 1xRTT coverage to ATT's GPRS coverage. Granted, the comparison is done by Sprint so it will obviously be in their favor but take it for what its worth:

    http://www.sprint.com/pcsbusiness/compare/coverage.html
    Also, keep in mind that ATT's wireless network is somewhat smaller than Sprints, but T-Mobile's network is just as large as Sprint's (You'll notice they didn't compare T-Mobile which has a substantially larger network and has roaming agreements with all the other GSM/GPRS networks).

    T-Mobile's GSM/GPRS map is comparable to Sprint's: http://www.t-mobile.com/coverage/

    Like I said before, all that really matters is whether or not the service meets your needs. Shop around. And be aware that these maps aren't very accurate. They shouldn't be used as the only criteria for deciding on a carrier.

    I suggest that you talk to people in your area about their coverage. Particularly in the areas you frequent most, like your workplace, your travel routes, shopping centers, restaurants, parks, etc. See how the coverage is in those areas and then weigh whether or not the service is acceptable for you.

    Then you can determine which other factors such as:

    - International travel (GSM)
    - Higher-speed web browsing (CDMA)
    - Receiving calls during data communication (GSM)
    - Pervasiveness in the U.S. (CDMA)
    - Price (Carrier-dependent)
    - SMS/MMS implementation (native on GSM, not as well-implemented on CDMA)
    - Portability (GSM via SIM cards)

    ...are most important to you.
    --Inspector Gadget

    "Go Go Gadget Pre!!"
    Palm Pre on Sprint

    Palm V--> Palm IIIc--> Visor Prism--> Visor Phone--> Treo 270--> Treo 600--> Treo 650-->
    Treo 700wx--> HTC Touch Diamond--> Palm Pre & HTC EVO 4G.
  18. #18  
    I am suprised that the GSM version will not be able to do edge. The service has already rolled out in Indianapolis via Cingular and seems to be well in the pipeline for T-mobile and ATT. An edge enabled 600 would make the gsm version a lot more compelling to me. The CDMA would seem stupid...

    In addition, once edge service is rolled out (say 1yr from now) the gsm treo will seem "old".

    Maybe one of the potential "feature rich" updated models follwing the initial release will do edge...

    -rob
  19. #19  
    Having just been without a phone for a few weeks while it was'nt being fixed (long story), I'll never buy anything without a SIM instead. I also like the international aspect of GPRS.

    I'm skeptical about claims that the real-world data rates will be significantly different. If the data rate on my Treo 300 is any example, CDMA is slow as you-know-what.

    Does anyone have any experience with high performance GPRS vs CDMA PCMCIA cards in screaming laptops, so we can get the PDA out of the equation and see what the networks are really doing? I've heard some comments on the grapevine suggesting that the Treo 270 is noticably faster than the 300 when doing data, but have no personal experience.

    -l
    _lr_ at yahoo.com
  20. #20  
    The peak transmission speed for gprs is limited to 56k. Vision averages this, and can hit over 140k.

    There is really no comparison. Vision is even faster than Verizon's express network (by a hair) in terms of downstream data flow. (Current PC Mag)

    Edge is being introduced by gsm carriers to compete with (and better) 1xRTT.

    Also, if you havent read the "your treo is that fast?" story on this forum you should. The evidence of 1xRTT over GPRS in terms of speed is compelling.


    -rob
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