View Poll Results: The Treo 600's built-in battery... friend or foe?

Voters
127. You may not vote on this poll
  • Friend!

    33 25.98%
  • Foe!

    63 49.61%
  • Undecided...

    14 11.02%
  • Could care less.

    15 11.81%
  • What was the question again?

    2 1.57%
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 66
  1.    #1  
    BUILT-IN BATTERY
    Regarding the built-in battery issue, if the Treo 600 WERE just a normal phone, 5-6 hours talk time would be more than enough for me, but if I'm gonna be listening to music, surfing the web, playing games, writing notes, taking photos, etc. on this amazing multimedia device, I think a spare battery option would definitely be a good idea! Call it piece of mind, but I like having a backup.

    THAT GREAT BIG BATTERY HOME IN THE SKY
    Furthermore, this Treo 600 is going to be so advanced that I'm sure it will last me for some time... probably, even after the battery starts to lose some of it's original vigor. Batteries, like people, get old and die. Just a simple fact of life. How would you like it if you bought a brand new Porsche but the battery was built-in and could not be changed without a big hassle?

    I had a Motorola phone and the battery life started to get shorter and shorter in less than a year! I changed the battery and BAM!, problem solved. I would definitely sacrifice making the phone a little thicker just to know that I could go out, buy a new battery and switch it out on the fly, if needed.

    "But what do I know, I eat my own ****!"
    - Triumph, the Insult Comic Dog

    What do YOU guys think?
  2. #2  
    this is the one reason i will not be getting the treo 600...
  3. #3  
    While it's good that they doubled the battery life for the Treo 600, I would have preferred the unit be slightly larger and have a removable battery. 5-6 hours of talk time sounds great. But since this thing can play mp3s, I have a feeling I'll be blowing through battery life doing that. I just hope they'll make a battery sled for it that isn't a monstrosity like for the 300.
  4. #4  
    And of course after adjusting for the typical manufacturer exaggerations, you'll get 3-4 hours of talk time (if you're lucky).
  5. #5  
    Originally posted by KRamsauer
    And of course after adjusting for the typical manufacturer exaggerations, you'll get 3-4 hours of talk time (if you're lucky).
    Ha. I was trying to account for that. The 300 is advertised as getting 2.5 hours, and I get 2. The Treo 600 CDMA is supposed to get 5 so I trimmed it down to 4, double that of my Treo 300.
  6. #6  
    Originally posted by letsgoflyers81


    Ha. I was trying to account for that. The 300 is advertised as getting 2.5 hours, and I get 2. The Treo 600 CDMA is supposed to get 5 so I trimmed it down to 4, double that of my Treo 300.
    Isn't it crazy how wrong those claims are? I routinely read reviews where if the reviewer gets 75% of the claimed battery life, they are satisfied.
  7. #7  
    Originally posted by KRamsauer
    Isn't it crazy how wrong those claims are? I routinely read reviews where if the reviewer gets 75% of the claimed battery life, they are satisfied.
    Exactly. The GSM Treo 600 is supposed to get up to 6 hours, I wouldn't expect much more than 5. And I'm not sure why the GSM model should get 20% more talk time. Is it all do to the architecture of GSM vs CDMA or do you think there are other reasons?
  8. #8  
    if it lasts the whole day. My 300 lasts more than two days with my current usage. If the 600 will last about the same even with MP3 and camera usage, then I'll be happy. I would never sacrifice size for a removable battery. There's always a workaround for recharging. As for replacing the battery after it's useful life, that point is moot for me. There is always new technology around the corner - faster wireless data networks and cooler PDAphones. I'll be surprised if I hold on to the 600 more than a year.
    Palm III > Palm V > Palm Vx > (Sprint) Kyo 6035 > Handspring Treo 300
    > Handspring Treo 600 Oct.'03 > Palm Treo 700P May'06 > Treo 755P Aug.'07 > Pre(-) June'09 + TouchPad July'11 LONG LIVE webOS!!!
  9.    #9  
    If more people thought like that and replaced their stuff with a brand new version of the same product each time it was upgraded or modified, then the manufacturers would make a killing!!!

    They could just produce 2-3 new upgrades a year and watch all the suckers line up to keep buying them over and over. If you have the money to do that or you just don't care about getting ripped off, more power to you...

    But for most normal people, you buy something of quality, you want it to last awhile. Most people that spend $500+ on a phone, chances are they will take care of it and "ride it till the wheels fall off."

    I agree that the battery talk times are almost always over-estimated. Furthermore, it WILL without a doubt continue to decrease over the life of the phone. The built-in battery on the Treo 600 could prove to be an Achilles Heel for an otherwise near-perfect product.

    RayUSA
    Last edited by RayUSA; 07/30/2003 at 05:58 PM.
  10. #10  
    Handspring is actually advertising their new Treo 600 as a phone first, PDA second. Not the other way round. Does anybody have a mobile phone which doesn't have a removable battery? Come on, even you have 10 hour of talk time, you still have the chances when you can't find a way to charge the drained battery. What would you do then?

    I remember when they first introduce Treo 180, they choose to announced it in HK, Singapore first. Why? Because people here like to try out new phones. And why is that? Because people here like to talk with a mobile phone. Good business for phone manufacturers and carriers. However, because of the same reason, you can't get so called enough battery time for these people.

    I like the color screen, I also like the camera built-in. But it's a phone afterall, I need a removable battery more than anything else.


    Jeff
  11. #11  
    Originally posted by letsgoflyers81


    Exactly. The GSM Treo 600 is supposed to get up to 6 hours, I wouldn't expect much more than 5. And I'm not sure why the GSM model should get 20% more talk time. Is it all do to the architecture of GSM vs CDMA or do you think there are other reasons?
    The difference in battery life between the two has to do with how CDMA and GSM differ in handing of frequencies.

    CDMA only transmits when there is something to say. This frees the channel to be used by someone else. But it means that the "connection" has to be reestablished when ready to transmit again. This happens a lot during a session. This draws power. It's like how your electric bill is higher when you turn lights on and off often versus just leaving it turned on. Each time you turn the light on, you draw more power than if it was already on to begin with.

    GSM slowly switches frequencies, but never stops transmitting. So the power draw is less (in a given amount of time). (No start-up costs in transmitting.)
    --Inspector Gadget

    "Go Go Gadget Pre!!"
    Palm Pre on Sprint

    Palm V--> Palm IIIc--> Visor Prism--> Visor Phone--> Treo 270--> Treo 600--> Treo 650-->
    Treo 700wx--> HTC Touch Diamond--> Palm Pre & HTC EVO 4G.
  12. #12  
    Originally posted by Insp_Gadget


    The difference in battery life between the two has to do with how CDMA and GSM differ in handing of frequencies.

    CDMA only transmits when there is something to say. This frees the channel to be used by someone else. But it means that the "connection" has to be reestablished when ready to transmit again. This happens a lot during a session. This draws power. It's like how your electric bill is higher when you turn lights on and off often versus just leaving it turned on. Each time you turn the light on, you draw more power than if it was already on to begin with.

    GSM slowly switches frequencies, but never stops transmitting. So the power draw is less (in a given amount of time). (No start-up costs in transmitting.)
    Gotcha, thanks.
  13. #13  
    Originally posted by liujf
    Handspring is actually advertising their new Treo 600 as a phone first, PDA second. Not the other way round. Does anybody have a mobile phone which doesn't have a removable battery?
    Sure do...and it's called the Treo 300!!
  14.    #14  
    Are there ANY advantages at all of having CDMA instead of GSM? General Packet Radio Service (GPRS) technology seems to be much more powerful with higher capacity than CDMA. Regarding the Treo 600, not only does the Batman (GSM) version look better, the battery life is better too!

    Interesting excerpt:

    ********************************************
    It is ever more likely that the phone you use is a GSM phone on a GSM network - using the top class standard relied on by millions of people worldwide.

    Quick Statistics : Below is a summary of some interesting GSM Statistics, demonstrating GSM's impact throughout the world.

    GSM Association total membership (May 2003) - 709

    No. of Countries/Areas with GSM System (May 2003) - 197

    GSM Total Subscribers - 863.6 million (end May 2003)

    GSM accounts for 72.0% of the World's digital market and 70.0% of the World's wireless market
  15. #15  
    Originally posted by RayUSA
    Are there ANY advantages at all of having CDMA instead of GSM? General Packet Radio Service (GPRS) technology seems to be much more powerful with higher capacity than CDMA. Regarding the Treo 600, not only does the Batman (GSM) version look better, the battery life is better too!

    Interesting excerpt:

    ********************************************
    It is ever more likely that the phone you use is a GSM phone on a GSM network - using the top class standard relied on by millions of people worldwide.

    Quick Statistics : Below is a summary of some interesting GSM Statistics, demonstrating GSM's impact throughout the world.

    GSM Association total membership (May 2003) - 709

    No. of Countries/Areas with GSM System (May 2003) - 197

    GSM Total Subscribers - 863.6 million (end May 2003)

    GSM accounts for 72.0% of the World's digital market and 70.0% of the World's wireless market
    Most of the world may be using GSM, but it hasn't surpased CDMA in the US in terms of reliability and functionality. T-Mobile, AT&T, and Cingular switched to GSM from TDMA not that long ago and they haven't gotten it running all that well yet. Not to mention that CDMA 1xRTT is faster than GPRS. Perhaps when GSM gets implemented to its potential it could give CDMA a run for its money, but right now, in the United States, it can't compare. By the time that happens, Sprint and Verizon could be on 1xEV-DO or even 1xEV-DV. Considering the current incarnations of both technologies in the US, CDMA has the advantage.
  16.    #16  
    Based on the poll results so far, it's pretty clear that most of us do not like the limitation of having a built-in battery. I will still get a Treo 600 when they are shipped cause it's such a great product, but I hope future versions will sport a removable battery design.

    FREEDOM
    I always carry a spare battery when I go on trips or when I'm on the road, and I can't say how much of a lifesaver it is!! It gives you the freedom and peace of mind so you're not constantly searching for outlets wherever you stay. It's so nice being able to go on a full weekend trip without having to even think about your charger.

    DUAL BATTERY SYSTEM
    Furthermore, I have always preferred the dual battery system. You use one battery while the other one stays charged and ready in the charging base. When the battery gets low, you just simply switch them out. BAM! Your phone has a fully charged battery and is ready to go immediately. Absolutely zero downtime waiting for the battery to charge.

    Don't you hate it when you have to interrupt the full charging cycle cause you get a phone call or have to leave the house right away? I can't count how many times I've tried to talk on my phone while it's sitting in the charging cradle cause the battery is almost dead but I get a call.

    Handspring? Mr. Hawkins, are you listening?
    Last edited by RayUSA; 07/31/2003 at 02:52 PM.
  17. #17  
    I think Handspring's excuse for not having a removeable battery is BS. I have had other phones with removeable batteries and they were still plenty thin. Certainly thinner than the current treo 300!

    Although I think we all applaud Handspring for creating such a seemingly "state of the art" device, you have to wonder "what were they thinking!" when they omit a removeable battery.

    Personally, I would have settled for 1/2 the talk time with a removeable battery and the phone came with 2 batteries (like the samsung i300 phone).
  18. #18  
    Originally posted by bbdwebz
    I think Handspring's excuse for not having a removeable battery is BS. I have had other phones with removeable batteries and they were still plenty thin. Certainly thinner than the current treo 300!
    Two things...

    You may have had other phones with removable batteries that were thinner the Treo, but I doubt they had the feature-set the Treo has. The Treo offers a LOT more than the traditional cell phone does, and I would fully expect it be bigger, bulkier, etc. because of it.

    As for Handspring's excuse on not adding a removable battery, yeah, it's a sucky excuse. But I don't think it's BS...at least, not to them. You have to bear in mind that this is a company that tends to favor industrial design above just about everything else, and I can actually picture Jeff Hawkins nixing the idea because "the mold seam throws off the whole design" or something like that. I really can envision that.

    It's dumb, though, and it sucks for us. But then again, a company that cares *THAT* much about design can certainly be reliable for good looking products (which they have been in the past), and it sure seems like Handspring does eventually catch up to everyone else eventually. Sadly, we just have to be the ones that wait another year or two for it!
  19.    #19  
    I don't think a removable battery would have made THAT significant a difference to the look, size or design of the Treo 600. I agree that the Handspring team thought long and hard about it and finally decided that the built-in battery would be "good enough." But I think they seriously underestimated how much more useful a removable battery would be and how much more consumers would have preferred it.

    I'm really surprised Hawkins, who has studied human behavior, did not realize how much more efficient a removable battery would be from a total user experience standpoint. True, some people might not need a removable battery. Well, they wouldn't have to remove it. But for those of us that want that versatility, they should have given us that option.

    To me, good design is all about versatility, functionality and the TOTAL USER EXPERIENCE!
  20. #20  
    Originally posted by NocTurnerV

    You may have had other phones with removable batteries that were thinner the Treo, but I doubt they had the feature-set the Treo has.
    I understand your points, I really do. But my Samsung i300 was pretty thin and other than a camera and sd slot, it basically had the same features.

    Originally posted by NocTurnerV

    You have to bear in mind that this is a company that tends to favor industrial design above just about everything else, and I can actually picture Jeff Hawkins nixing the idea because "the mold seam throws off the whole design" or something like that.
    I applaud Hawkins if what you envision is true, but I wish he would spend more time on quality control than where seams should be. I am on my 4th treo in 11 months, 3 for broken lid hinges and 1 for a defective battery! I'm sorry, but a $500 anything should not have a failure rate that high.
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast

Posting Permissions