View Poll Results: The Treo 600's built-in battery... friend or foe?

Voters
127. You may not vote on this poll
  • Friend!

    33 25.98%
  • Foe!

    63 49.61%
  • Undecided...

    14 11.02%
  • Could care less.

    15 11.81%
  • What was the question again?

    2 1.57%
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 61 to 66 of 66
  1. #61  
    I haven't owned an extra battery since I had an early TDMA Ericson phone with AT&T. My previous phone as a Motorola 8250, and though the battery was replacable, I never needed to buy another.

    Of course, back in the day when you were lucky to have the phone last 12 or 24 hours on a battery (even when not talking, just on), extra batteries were almost required.

    I don't recall if I've ever let my Treo go over 2 days without a charge, but since I need to plug it in to sync regardless, it is less of an issue. Plus, I have a car charger for when I'm driving.
  2. Minsc's Avatar
    Posts
    967 Posts
    Global Posts
    974 Global Posts
    #62  
    Quote Originally Posted by jpahl
    I think it helps that a) I'm not a heavy user & b) live in London where GSM cell sizes are very small so less power is required.
    Actually with GSM it doesn't matter. GSM phones trasmit at full power all the time regardless of cell signal strength/proximity. CDMA phones, however, are constantly adjusting their power output to adjust for changing conditions.
  3. #63  
    Quote Originally Posted by jpahl
    I think it helps that a) I'm not a heavy user & b) live in London where GSM cell sizes are very small so less power is required.

    But its definitely the case that if I charge it Sunday evening it will keep power until saturday morning (ie working week) with wireless switched on all the time with mixture of voice/sms/data/pda usage

    Last week I was off sailing and charged it sunday lunchtime and now (saturday evening) the charge is 42% - during the week occaisionally switched off wireless (to make sure the office couldn't get me!) but still did quite a bit of web browsing for weather forecasts.

    I guess you and others must use their phone a lot!

    SIX days??? Do you use the voice/data/sms/data/pda portion a lot? I've had days when the battery dropped from 100% -90% on a 50 minute commute. (Sprint)
  4. #64  
    Quote Originally Posted by Minsc
    Actually with GSM it doesn't matter. GSM phones trasmit at full power all the time regardless of cell signal strength/proximity. CDMA phones, however, are constantly adjusting their power output to adjust for changing conditions.
    Pretty sure that GSM uses power control. If you look at ETSI spec. ETS 300 577 it contains information on radio interface including in tables in section 4.1.1 with 32 power control levels from 5 to 39 dBm for 900 MHz and 0 to 36 dBm for 1800 MHz (noting that maximum power depends upon mobile station class)
  5. #65  
    Quote Originally Posted by skfny
    SIX days??? Do you use the voice/data/sms/data/pda portion a lot? I've had days when the battery dropped from 100% -90% on a 50 minute commute. (Sprint)
    Frequent PDA usage but relatively low levels of phone/sms/data usage
  6. #66  
    Quote Originally Posted by RayUSA
    Are there ANY advantages at all of having CDMA instead of GSM?
    The spectral efficiency of CDMA is much higher than that of a TDMA system like GSM (much as I hate having to agree with a nasty bunch like those guys at Qualcomm). So you get more conversations in the same bunch of bandwidth. Also you should get better battery life since you don't spend energy radiating when you're not talking, though this seems (as has been noted on this thread) to be more than made up for by the signal-processing cost of encoding and decoding the transmissions.

    Also CDMA seems to have a better reach than the GSM networks, though I would think this has more to do with the frequencies chosen (however it has been a few years since I worked on mobile phones so those memories have already started to fade! )

    So the answer to "which is better" depends on who you are.

    If you're a radio engineer or biz guy who has to put up towers, CDMA is better.

    Personally I prefer GSM because I can roam all over the place and have various advanced services that aren't available, or are only becoming available (like SMS) in the CDMA world. However in the US I use Verizon because they have by FAR the best coverage. And for me, making a phone call is the main reason for carrying a phone.
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234

Posting Permissions