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  1.    #1  
    According to this report from wired news:

    Handspring has shipped 330,000 Treo communicators to date, but Kort estimates that at least 100,000 units -- if not more -- are still sitting on the shelves of the company's retail partners. "That's why it was really imperative for (Handspring founders) Donna Dubinsky and Jeff Hawkins to sell the company this quarter before they reported earnings," he said.
    That's a ton of unsold treos to sell! Heck even subsidized at $200, I don't think they could possibly sell that many treos! IMHO, they're really going to have to dump the price further in order to move some of this inventory. More specifically, if I can get a new Treo 300 for <<$200 w/o signing a new contract, I would definitely snap up a couple...
    Last edited by Gaurav; 07/10/2003 at 05:10 PM.
  2. #2  
    Well, if there are 300,000 in circulation, judging by the lid-break rates, the stock should be used up quickly as replacement units. Genius! <cough cough>
  3. #3  
    The article doesn't say it's just Treo 300 models. Yeah, if they'd start selling the Treo 270 < $200 without a contract I'd buy one.
  4. #4  
    Originally posted by gfunkmagic
    That's a ton of unsold treos to sell!
    It's actually over 16 tons of Treo.

    5.4/16*100,000/2,000=16.875 using the weight of a 270
  5.    #5  
    Originally posted by potatoho
    The article doesn't say it's just Treo 300 models. Yeah, if they'd start selling the Treo 270 < $200 without a contract I'd buy one.
    Good point... but that's still a whole lot of inventory just sitting there. I have a feeling the Treo270/300 will be selling for a long time even after the debut of the Treo 600...
  6. Catman51's Avatar
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    #6  
    Well, I ordered one from Handspring, so that's one less!
    Steve M
    Catman51
    Happy with my T300
    Waiting for my T600
  7. #7  
    Originally posted by Catman51
    Well, I ordered one from Handspring, so that's one less!
    Does it? The article mentions "retail partners" so perhaps it doesn't even include those still at the mother ship?
  8. #8  
    If current prices are any indication, it is possible that the surplus is more of 270's than 300's. You can currently grab a T-Mobile 270 from Amazon for $69.99 (which is an unbelievable price for what you're getting).

    I just ordered one too, so it's no longer 100,000
  9. #9  
    If there 100,000 unsold, presumably new units, why does Sprint send out refurbed units (that don't work) when they do a warranty replacement? I used to love my Treo - but after it broke and they sent me another broken one as a replacment, I gave up. Enough is enough - I'm getting Samsung - I need a functional, working phone already.
  10. #10  
    Originally posted by sprintster
    If there 100,000 unsold, presumably new units, why does Sprint send out refurbed units (that don't work) when they do a warranty replacement? I used to love my Treo - but after it broke and they sent me another broken one as a replacment, I gave up. Enough is enough - I'm getting Samsung - I need a functional, working phone already.
    Here's a hunch: Sprint pays for the # of phones it thinks it needs (with perhaps some provisions for low sales) and then takes over the service role. In this case, the fewer times they have to go back to HS for more units (for replacements, for instance) the less money they spend.
  11. #11  
    Originally posted by KRamsauer
    Here's a hunch: Sprint pays for the # of phones it thinks it needs (with perhaps some provisions for low sales) and then takes over the service role. In this case, the fewer times they have to go back to HS for more units (for replacements, for instance) the less money they spend.
    That may very well be as the shelf life of phones is rapidly approaching lettuce. They might have to decide before the manufacturing process begins how many to make, after which time the fab or plant is reorganized to mass produce the next gadget.

    To try and understand how we went from a kid who built boats with his father and brothers, who was interested in biophysics, how the brain works, and wanted to come up with a handheld device better than paper to a situation of 100,000 unsold treos I started searching in google and found the following 3 page article which was very informative. Many of you may have read it when it originally came out in Pen Computing in 2000, but it was new to me.

    http://www.pencomputing.com/palm/Pen33/hawkins1.html

    I must say after reading the article I am very impressed with Jeff Hawkins. Imagine if JFK had, as well as stating that we were going to land a man on the moon before the decade is out and bring him back safely to earth, himself brought together the people to develop the Apollo and worked intimitly with them every step of the way. Any successes and failures of the current treos are just the latest of a series of same from the beginning, starting with the Zoomer (see article). The treos aren't perfect any more than the shuttles are perfect. Even the international space station has a limited life expectancy.

    Jeff's goal is to figure out how the brain works and trivial things like earning a living and forging companies through bull and bear markets are distractions that keep postponing his book about brain theory.

    I was in a way bummed that Handspring sold out to Palm because it showed that making handhelds was not going to be a profitable business. And how would Palm SG welcome former expatriates Jeff and Donna. Would there be animosity. After reading the article link above I don't think so. Following a brief google search about Eric Benhamou leads me to think that he is too spread out to offer vision to palm. I think he is basically concerned with two things: how much did we spend and how much did we take in. Everything else I think he's content to leave to capable subordinates with vision like Jeff.

    Another interesting thing about the article is the companies that have played a part in the past. Like GRiD Computing, Tandy, USRobotics, GEOWorks (like BeOS now) 3COM. GRiD didn't want to take a chance on a consumer palm device. Where are GRiD products now? In the Topeka Computing Museum. Another facet of the article is handwriting recognition. What if they skipped that step and went with a thumbpad from the beginning? And there's the Microsoft angle. Gates is like the super industrialist whereas Hawkins is a true inventor. I bet Microsoft has people at high levels who used to work at GRiD now working on TabletPC's. Today I visited a Verizon store to check out a Samsung i700. Cool device, but before I figured out how to get pocket internet explorer to display pictures, the battery died.

    I think part of the problem with palm and handsprings finances is the atmosphere in which they were born (internet bubble). PocketPC's are getting better and they have the browser monopoly. What are the odds of two technologies, palmOS and PPC co-existing, each getting better, but neither able to kill the other, like a stalemate in chess? Perhaps if Microsoft kills PalmOS, Jeff will be able to complete his real work:

    "There's all this data about brains, all this factual knowledge about neurobiology--but there's almost no theory there. There's no real concrete theory that pulls it all together. It's one of the biggest mysteries in science, and very few people realize that. The whole thing is missing this conceptual 'Aha!"
    David
  12. #12  
    Originally posted by drw
    "There's all this data about brains, all this factual knowledge about neurobiology--but there's almost no theory there. There's no real concrete theory that pulls it all together. It's one of the biggest mysteries in science, and very few people realize that. The whole thing is missing this conceptual 'Aha!" --Jeff Hawkins
    And this is why Jeff is greater than Bill. He's not concerned whether AOL can have an icon on the desktop or not. He's not scouring the business world for technologies that he could copy, appropriate, or buy to make his stack of cash bigger. To be fair, I haven't read Bills books (the road ahead, and business at the speed of ?) so perhaps I'm biased, but compared to cut-throat business practices, Jeff's desire to figure out what makes us, "us" seems more noble and more important than Microsoft's real need to constantly come up with new things to stick in the operating system to require greater hardware capability which entails another OS purchase that's wedded with the hardware.
    David

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