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  1.    #1  
    I order the Mapopolis product through Mobile Planet and strongly recommend that, if you must get it, you use a different reseller -- Mobile Plant is terrible! (Get ready for spam.)

    The Mapopolis product is described only as "GPS for Treo bundle." In fact, it is a car navigation system. GSP is hard-wired to a car cigarette light plug that cannot be removed or changed. It also requires a 12volt DC power supply, which does not lend itself to portability.

    It has a preference to stay on for one hour after removal from power supply, but this does not really work.

    Furthermore, although they do not say it, the US version comes with all maps on a CD, while the European version comes with a code number to download one at a time. I don't know exactly how many maps there are for all of Europe, but I would guess several hunderd -- all to download one at a time!

    In use, I did not find the GPS to be very accurate. I would estimate it was off by about 100 meters (300 feet). The GPS calibrates in American measure (not metric), so if you get the feeling that this product is not intended for Europeans, you are correct.

    In brief, if you live in Europe or plan on visiting, I cannot say that this product is ready for Prime Time.
  2. Andreas's Avatar
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    #2  
    Originally posted by User #23093

    Furthermore, although they do not say it, the US version comes with all maps on a CD, while the European version comes with a code number to download one at a time. I don't know exactly how many maps there are for all of Europe, but I would guess several hunderd -- all to download one at a time!

    The european countries can be downloaded as a zip-file, one for each country so in total 24 files. Not many but prepare for some timeconsuming download cause its 550mb of data.

    I have just bought the mappack but am thinking about getting the GPS. Are you saying that the GPS wont work unless connected to 12v ie is it totaly useless if im out walking?

    Btw, does the GPS look similar to this one?

    http://www.holux.com.tw/Temp%20web/GM-210.html

    or is it this one?

    http://www.semsons.com/itmousgpsrec.html

    Kind regards
    Andreas
  3. #3  
    I have and use Mapopolis in the US and enjoy the product. I used to have a Visor and had the Magellan springboard GPS unit that attached to the Visor. That was a very nice way to use the GPS and mapopolis. I don't know if all the GPS units for the treo are locked into power feeds from the cigarette lighters. That would be a pain, although it seems like you ought to be able to rig up some 12 volt supply to mimic the plug that would be a tad more portable.

    Generally, GPS has an accuracy of somewhere near 15 m. That said, youir maps may be inaccurate also. It is not uncommon to have tens of meters (or more) inaccuracy in a map. Add up the inaccuracies and you may end up 100's of meters off. If all goes well, your position might be dead on too. There are ways to increase the accuracy of the GPS position (WAAS, etc.) that can get your true position down to a few meters. With a good map, I found the Magellan and Geode springboard GPS units quite accurate enough for navigating in a major city here. The one time I looked at a sample map of Ireland, I was a tad disappointed, although it was a free map, so it might have had limited resolution for that reason.

    I still use Mapopolis with my treo, even without the GPS, because I find it to be the best mapping solution I have found for this area.
  4.    #4  
    Originally posted by Andreas

    I have just bought the mappack but am thinking about getting the GPS. Are you saying that the GPS wont work unless connected to 12v ie is it totaly useless if im out walking?
    First let me correct a couple of things from my original post: the setting can indeed be changed to metric in the preferences and the accuracy is somewhat better -- probably within 20-30 meters.

    Now, to your question. The answer is yes, it won't work without a 12v battery. There is a setting to keep the power on for one hour (after removal from the car battery), however I have been unable to get this to work.

    Furthermore, I have searched for portable 12 volt batteries and the smallest I could find seem to be quite impractical for walking about a city. I have thought about building my own from D-cells, but it would take eight of them to reach the right voltage, which is also inconvenient.

    I'd like to also point out that the car cigarette plug cannot be removed. Thus, when walking around, you need to bring all the connectors and wires.


    Btw, does the GPS look similar to this one?

    http://www.holux.com.tw/Temp%20web/GM-210.html

    or is it this one?

    http://www.semsons.com/itmousgpsrec.html
    The GPS is made by Holux, their name is on the product. I hope this helps you.
  5.    #5  
    Originally posted by jaytee
    I have and use Mapopolis in the US and enjoy the product. I used to have a Visor and had the Magellan springboard GPS unit that attached to the Visor. That was a very nice way to use the GPS and mapopolis. I don't know if all the GPS units for the treo are locked into power feeds from the cigarette lighters. That would be a pain, although it seems like you ought to be able to rig up some 12 volt supply to mimic the plug that would be a tad more portable.
    I don't know of any GPS for the Treo other than this one. And, yes, it is tied into the cigarette light power. I too thought it wouldn't be too hard to rig up something, but now I am not so sure.


    I still use Mapopolis with my treo, even without the GPS, because I find it to be the best mapping solution I have found for this area.
    I too like the Mapopolis, but it is really designed mostly for Americans in America. For example, when searching for a route within a city, the program will assume that you only have a car and so will find the best route only via driving.

    Many cities in Europe have areas in the cities where cars are not permitted and, in general, far more streets are one-way than in America I think. So, if you are walking or biking in a city, the directions will usually take you far out of your way.

    A second thing is that addresses in the search function use the American syntax rather than the European. So, in America, an address might be 123 Elm Street. In Europe, that address might be written as Elmstreet 123.

    When I first tried Mapopolis, I did not know this, and so could not find any streets!

    However, I suspect American tourists in Europe very rarely look up addresses. Who, for example, would know the address of the Eiffel Tower?

    Furthermore, I suspect this is a data function rather than an application function. IOW, the address are stored in a data base in the map, not in the application. So, if the addresses were stored using the European address syntax, it would probably work.
  6. #6  
    Originally posted by User #23093


    ... snip ...

    Many cities in Europe have areas in the cities where cars are not permitted and, in general, far more streets are one-way than in America I think.

    ... snip ...

    It depends on which city here you are in, but generally you are probably right. I'd bet it's related mostly to city age. Boston, for instance, has quite a few small, twisty, one-way streets. Atlanta has less.

    I can't imagine trying to use my treo and mapopolis while driving the streets of some cities I've visited in Ireland though. Many seem less than 1 way ... one way with cars parked on both sides. Now that I think of it, I don't use my treo for driving directions in Atlanta unless I'm the passenger. (just plain crazy drivers here.)

    The best solution was the Handspring Visor with a Magellan or GeoDiscovery springboard GPS unit. They both had their own batteries in the unit and were supported by multiple GPS software vendors.

    I haven't even considered a GPS for the treo. I'd be bothered by all the wires and such too. Maybe the best bet is to wait a while and get a Treo 600. Isn't it supposed to have an SD slot? Maybe an SD slot GPS is in my future
  7.    #7  
    I have now found out that the GPS will not work AT ALL without a 12volt battery. So, taking it out of the car is not an option unless you have a portable battery. I received this information directly from Mapopolis.

    And yes, I am very disappointed too.
  8. #8  
    Originally posted by User #23093
    I have now found out that the GPS will not work AT ALL without a 12volt battery. So, taking it out of the car is not an option unless you have a portable battery. I received this information directly from Mapopolis.

    And yes, I am very disappointed too.
    Why not use two 6 volt cells, like the Eveready EVR-539BP?

    # 6 Volts
    # 595 mAh
    # Alkaline
    # Replaces: Duracell 7K67
    # Replaces: Rayovac 867

    Or better yet, a couple of rechargeable 9v NiMH cells, and drop the output to 12v.
  9.    #9  
    Originally posted by jaytee


    Why not use two 6 volt cells, like the Eveready EVR-539BP?

    Thanks for that information, jaytee, it's very helpful.

    In the meantime, I have some more information that may be useful and interesting, but quite challenging as well.

    First of all, I want to be clear about how this system works. So, here is a sort of wiring diagram:

    Cigarette lighter plug--------------------Treo
    |
    |
    Accessory connector (DIN)

    Everything is hardwired to the cigarette lighter connector.

    This whole system is actually a car recharger for the Treo with an accessory connector, to which a GPS (or other accessory) can be connected.

    Now, an important point to bear in mind here is that the primary function of the 12volt battery requirement is to recharge the Treo!

    On another site, I found the following very interesting information: "The unit (GPS) consumes less than 170mA with a 4.5-5.5V input."

    So, if it could be possible to power the GPS directly, without also trying to recharge the Treo, this would be a piece of cake! The challenge is figuring out how.
  10. #10  
    Originally posted by User #23093


    ... snip ...

    Now, an important point to bear in mind here is that the primary function of the 12volt battery requirement is to recharge the Treo!

    On another site, I found the following very interesting information: "The unit (GPS) consumes less than 170mA with a 4.5-5.5V input."

    So, if it could be possible to power the GPS directly, without also trying to recharge the Treo, this would be a piece of cake! The challenge is figuring out how.
    Wish I had one of the GPS units to play around with, but it sounds like you should be able to power just the GPS. With such low power requirements, it sounds like you could use a 3 or 4 AA or AAA cells in a battery strapped to the bottom of the GPS unit. If they were rechargable, you'd have a neat solution.
  11. #11  
    I have just completed going through this.

    My solution was to get a stand alone GPS.

    For the cost of Mapopolous and the Holux GPS you can get a hand held GPS from Garmin or Magellan with downloadable maps in a handheld.

    I also looked at QuoVadis and a cable to a GPS. Treo has some serial port problems.

    A Garmin etrex series, Magellan Sportrack series, or Garmin GPS V all work just as well as a Treo and GPS without any of these problems and may cost less.

    Just a thought...

    Originally posted by jaytee


    Wish I had one of the GPS units to play around with, but it sounds like you should be able to power just the GPS. With such low power requirements, it sounds like you could use a 3 or 4 AA or AAA cells in a battery strapped to the bottom of the GPS unit. If they were rechargable, you'd have a neat solution.
  12.    #12  
    Originally posted by Smartphone Fan
    I have just completed going through this.

    My solution was to get a stand alone GPS.
    You raise a very good point. It is true that you can probably find a much better solution at a good price. However, assuming you are bringing your Treo anyway (it is handy for so many other things), it means you will have to carry two devices instead of one.

    Since the devices are pretty small, that should be no major problem. However, I still feel that the *ideal* solution would be a logically constructed GPS for the Treo.
  13. #13  
    Originally posted by User #23093


    You raise a very good point. It is true that you can probably find a much better solution at a good price. However, assuming you are bringing your Treo anyway (it is handy for so many other things), it means you will have to carry two devices instead of one.

    Since the devices are pretty small, that should be no major problem. However, I still feel that the *ideal* solution would be a logically constructed GPS for the Treo.
    I agree completly with you. My initial desire was to use the Treo as the display for a GPS. I had a Garmin GPS 12 and had used QuoVadis with my Kyocera 6135, 7135, and Palm IIIc.

    I needed to move to the Treo because of network coverage issues in the city I am moving to.

    When you look at the size of the delomre Earthmate, You realize it is the size of a handheld GPS. Same for the Holux that is set up for the Treo. The Holux only works with power from a Car Power adapter.

    The Garmin 12 needs a cable connection to a PDA for map display.

    The Treo has real problems with serial communications. Purple Data has a special battery powered cable and then you need an adapter cable, then the Garmin serial cable. This would cost about $100, plus the GPS.

    The math is about the same to get the same cables and then use an earthmate.

    The Holux costs about $200 with mapoplus, but it will only work plugged into a car.

    In practice, you end up with two devices no matter what you do.

    I ended up selling my Garmin 12, and getting a mapping GPS. It cost about the same as as adapting a GPS to the Treo.

    I can use it independently of the Treo and in the car I have less problems with cables and mounting.

    Right now, if you want a all in one convergence device, then the Kyocera 7135 seems to be the best choice. Cheap GPS with a serial connection to the 7135, Mapopolus or QuoVadis Software.

    On the Pocket PC, a CF GPS with a Dell is pretty cheap as well. It just is not a phone. The PocketPC phones have SD slots that are NOT SDIO, so you will need to find a serial solution.

    In the end, a handheld Mapping GPS, with downloadable maps was my solution. It was not my first choice.
  14. #14  
    Originally posted by Smartphone Fan



    Right now, if you want a all in one convergence device, then the Kyocera 7135 seems to be the best choice. Cheap GPS with a serial connection to the 7135, Mapopolus or QuoVadis Software.

    Or get an older handspring visor, a visorphone and a magellan GPS springboard and Mapopolis. I even had a little widget I could plug the visorphone into without the visor.

    Probably pretty cheap if you could find the stuff now on e-bay
  15.    #15  
    Originally posted by jaytee

    Or get an older handspring visor, a visorphone and a magellan GPS springboard and Mapopolis. I even had a little widget I could plug the visorphone into without the visor.
    Well, I had one of those, and never really liked it (though I did not have GPS for it). I thought the ringer on the visorphone was much too soft to be useful and the visor plus phone was too big and too heavy.

    OTOH, I much prefered the telephone software on the Visorphone to what is on the Treo today. It's a shame they upgraded the hardware and downgraded the software!

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