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  1.    #1  
    Many people are complaining about how big the Treo 600 is.

    The truth is that it is very small.

    When I played with a Treo 600 I could not get over how tiny and comfotable it was.

    Forget about measurements or weight...ask yourself if it looks too big...or if it looks just right.

    I you don't believe me look at this picture:

    http://mobile.burn.com/review.jsp?Page=5&Id=366

    Jake
    Last edited by JakeE; 07/11/2003 at 07:31 PM.
    There is a great difference between knowing and understanding. You can know a lot about something without understanding it. —Charles Kettering
    -------------------------------------------------
    Treo 600: Love at First Sight by Jake Ehrlich

    Thoughts on the Future of Handheld Computing: A 5 Part Series by Jake Ehrlich
  2. purpleX
    purpleX's Avatar
    #2  
    iPaq h1910 = 6.71 (4.46" x 2.75" x 0.50") 4.23 oz.
    iPaq 2200 = 8.3 (4.54" x 3.00" x 0.61") 5.1 oz.
    XDA = (5.8" x 2.90" x 0.70")

    treo 600 = (4.41" x 2.26" x 0.87") ~6 oz.
    TI Wanda = (4.63" x 2.93" x 0.79") 6.1 oz.
    SPVE100 = (4.73" x 1.97" x 0.91") 4.23 0z.

    The picture does not compare treo600 against other device.
  3. #3  
    This may be splitting hairs, but some websites state the width of the 600 is 2.36 inches while say 2.26 inches. Hey, a tenth of an inch is a tenth of an inch.

    I measured the dimensions of a face on view of the 600 on my monitor. Using 4.41 inches as the length (which all sites agree upon) in my calculations, I extrapolated a value of 2.33 inches for the width, so I think 2.36 inches may be correct.

    Does anyone know?
  4. #4  
    I may be wrong, Jake, but I'd venture to say that there's a substantial "silent majority" who's only complaint is that we have to wait until October to get a 600. Hurry up Handspring!
  5.    #5  
    Stickman:

    Excellent point...I agree. I can't wait!!!

    Chu Zoo & My Shadow:

    Forget about measurements for a second. Look at the photo and tell me if it looks too big...or just right????

    That is the issue...how does it look?

    Jake
    Last edited by JakeE; 07/09/2003 at 11:11 PM.
    There is a great difference between knowing and understanding. You can know a lot about something without understanding it. —Charles Kettering
    -------------------------------------------------
    Treo 600: Love at First Sight by Jake Ehrlich

    Thoughts on the Future of Handheld Computing: A 5 Part Series by Jake Ehrlich
  6. #6  
    You're right, it does look svelt and easy to use single-handedly. It's very similar in thickness and width to my Kyocera 6035, but shorter and lighter.

    I like the candybar style which I can whip out of my bicycle jersey back pocket while riding and dial without fumbling with a flip lid or clamshell (like I can with my 6035).

    Can't wait to see one in person.
  7.    #7  
    Chu Zoo

    Take it a step further, how about whipping it out of your bicycle jersey back pocket while riding without fumbliling with a flip lid or clamshell and adding a to-do or an oppointment.
    There is a great difference between knowing and understanding. You can know a lot about something without understanding it. —Charles Kettering
    -------------------------------------------------
    Treo 600: Love at First Sight by Jake Ehrlich

    Thoughts on the Future of Handheld Computing: A 5 Part Series by Jake Ehrlich
  8. #8  
    Well, that may be a little tricky thumb typing with one thumb! But I suppose it could be done since you can navigate around the screen without the stylus.

    How easy is it to dial a phone number? I like dialing with hard keys versus on screen (which is why my Kyocera has served me well up until now). I think it is very clever how Handspring has imbedded a regular key pad within the keyboard.
  9.    #9  
    Chu Zoo

    It is really easy to dial on the hard thumboard keys. The Treo 600 hard keys are shaped like tic-tacs. The Treo 300 hard keys are shaped like mini chicklets.

    If you were trying to type using tic-tacs it is easier because you barely have to hit the key. With a chicklet flat key, you have to hit it just right and make sure you don't hit another key by mistake.

    Does this make sense?

    Jake
    There is a great difference between knowing and understanding. You can know a lot about something without understanding it. —Charles Kettering
    -------------------------------------------------
    Treo 600: Love at First Sight by Jake Ehrlich

    Thoughts on the Future of Handheld Computing: A 5 Part Series by Jake Ehrlich
  10. purpleX
    purpleX's Avatar
    #10  
    If they are so great than why didn't handpsring do tictac keys for treo 300 and lower?
  11.    #11  
    purpleX

    Wow!!! A real question? I almost don't know what to do?

    I think that when Jeff Hawkins realized that Graffiti was bogus it must have traumatized him...after all, he invented it. I would imagine he got a hold of a Blackberry and said: Oh!?!? I know when my brother first showed me his Blackberry, I was impressed with the keyboard input method.

    I imagine the design of the original Treo was pretty difficult and I know it looks antiquated next to the Treo 600, but I think that there was probably a great deal of afterthought design that went into the 600. I imagine that by the time HS got the original Treo to market they realized its shortcomings.

    I imagine Jeff thought to himself; there has got to be a way to make it smaller and more phone like. I further imagine that through experimenting they figured out the benefit of convex keys.

    Jake
    There is a great difference between knowing and understanding. You can know a lot about something without understanding it. —Charles Kettering
    -------------------------------------------------
    Treo 600: Love at First Sight by Jake Ehrlich

    Thoughts on the Future of Handheld Computing: A 5 Part Series by Jake Ehrlich
  12. purpleX
    purpleX's Avatar
    #12  
    Xerox is about to sue their *** off. It's hardly a pure moment of inspiration.
  13. #13  
    I'm still very worried about the screen being all scratched up without a cover. I've had a visor deluxe, visor edge (which I bought for its strong aluminum casing) and the treo 300. All of em can get pretty scratched up in my pocket so I've always kept a cover on them... even when it's looked pretty ****ty with such a bugle in my pocket. Now all of a sudden the Treo 600 claims the screen to be remarkably scratch proof. Doesn't anyone find this a bit too good to be true?

    I know I know, its made out of some super-duper chemicals that not even superman can penitrate... but how bout a site not from handspring where the same material is demonstrated as being scratch proof? Then I'll feel more confident in getting a Treo 600.
  14.    #14  
    purpleX:

    I did not know about Xerox, but I think I remember hearing about how Blackberry did sue them and they won.

    CmdrGuard:

    Excellent point! I am curious also. Handspring told me they did extremely extensive durablility testing. I had a Palm V for a long time and I carried it everywhere and never scratched it? I guess time will tell
    There is a great difference between knowing and understanding. You can know a lot about something without understanding it. —Charles Kettering
    -------------------------------------------------
    Treo 600: Love at First Sight by Jake Ehrlich

    Thoughts on the Future of Handheld Computing: A 5 Part Series by Jake Ehrlich
  15. #15  
    Jake,

    Not having used a Treo before, when you dial from the keyboard, do you have to hold the shift or function key down, or does it somehow remain engaged until you finish dialing all the numbers?
  16.    #16  
    Chu Zoo

    This is where the Treo is brilliant!!!!

    If you are in any OTHER app BESIDES the phone app you would have to hold down the option key to type a number.

    BUT, if you hit the phone button it defaults to the first quick dial screen. On the first quick dial screen there are 10 names that you program in advance. You can move the 5 way button to navigate to any name and then hit it and it calls that person.

    Also in the quick dial app there are 5 screens that can each hold 10 contacts. So lets say you want to speed dial someone you know is on screen three, when you get to the Speed dial app you hit the UP button on the 5way navigation button and it takes you to the second page of speed dials, you hit UP again and you end up on the third speed dial page.

    Then you hit the down button four times to get to the person you want and then you simply hit enter and it dials them. On the Treo 600 you can also use the speed dial buttons for favorites. So by hitting a special button which you assigned in advance it could launch your chess game lets say.

    Let’s say you want to call Steve Jobs. You hit the phone button to enter into the Speed dial screen, and then you type SJ. Let’s assume you don't have anybody else in your phone book with his initials it would take you to his name with all his numbers. If you click on his name it will enter you into his contact file for editing or viewing notes or addresses or whatever you want. But if instead of selecting his name you select one of his phone numbers it will call that number.

    But let’s say you also have a contact named Steve Johnson in your contact list, after you type SJ you would see both names on the screen and you could move to Steve Jobs and select his number you want to call, or you could keep typing. Once you have typed SJOB which is four letters it would isolate his name and numbers and Steve Johnson’s name and numbers would disappear off the screen.

    But the Treo is so smart, that if you were to just start dialing a phone number that was not in your contact list it would recognize it and automatically switch you into the screen with the dial pad on the screen, but you keep dialing with the keys on the thumboard. When you have all the numbers in you hit the enter key and it dials. I think on the Treo 600 you can also hit the center button on the 5 way navigation button.

    What is soo cool is the Treo can distinguish whether you are trying to look up a number in your contact list or whether you are trying to enter in a new number. I believe this feature is called predictive dialing.

    The way it works is the Treo knows that if you are in the phone app to start looking up the contact, but if you hit a key other than the ones with numbers on them it goes to the contact list. Let’s say your phone number you want to call is 555-5555. The 5 is on the J key. Once you have typed in JJ it with stay in the contact list only if there is someone with the initials JJ, but once you hit the third J it realizes there is not anyone with who has a first name that begins with J and has a last name that begins JJ, so it switches you into the dial pad mode and displays the numbers on the screen as you dial.

    I hope that helps. If it was confusing please let me know, and I will try harder to make it sensible.

    Jake
    There is a great difference between knowing and understanding. You can know a lot about something without understanding it. —Charles Kettering
    -------------------------------------------------
    Treo 600: Love at First Sight by Jake Ehrlich

    Thoughts on the Future of Handheld Computing: A 5 Part Series by Jake Ehrlich
  17. #17  
    Chu Zoo-

    The one sentence answer: you don't need to hold down the shift or function key...the Treo's software senses that you are dialing a phone number and "holds it down" for you.
  18. #18  
    treo 600 = (4.41" x 2.26" x 0.87")

    Dats about the size of my remote controller of Sony DCR-PC9. Very close!!

    Bye bye.."paper treo". I can get hold of a solid one now..at least til fall..we hope

    ps. It has IR and removable batt...
    Last edited by Mcnab; 07/10/2003 at 03:00 AM.
    Mcnab
  19. #19  
    Originally posted by JakeE
    Chu Zoo

    If you are in any OTHER app BESIDES the phone app you would have to hold down the option key to type a number.
    You really never have to hold down the option key. The option status is retained by a single click of the option key and affects the next key you hit. Hitting the option key twice locks you into that mode. All this has made it easy to enter text, numbers and symbols with one hand in the current Treos.
  20. #20  
    Originally posted by CmdrGuard
    I'm still very worried about the screen being all scratched up without a cover. I've had a visor deluxe, visor edge (which I bought for its strong aluminum casing) and the treo 300. All of em can get pretty scratched up in my pocket so I've always kept a cover on them... even when it's looked pretty ****ty with such a bugle in my pocket. Now all of a sudden the Treo 600 claims the screen to be remarkably scratch proof. Doesn't anyone find this a bit too good to be true?

    I know I know, its made out of some super-duper chemicals that not even superman can penitrate... but how bout a site not from handspring where the same material is demonstrated as being scratch proof? Then I'll feel more confident in getting a Treo 600.
    Bottom line on this is to put a protector on the screen.... I do this with my Treo 300, even though there is a flip cover. Purple Moo does the trick nicely. I expect to be slapping it on my Treo 600, when I get it.

    I use the proctectors on all devices with a screen, esp. digital cameras. I have those in pocket and have next had a problem with screen scratches, as long as I protect is with the overlay.
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