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  1. #21  
    Originally posted by kazinvan


    If I'm going from meeting to meeting and using my PDA a lot, I can't just sit somewhere with the thing plugged into a wall. Also, when taking a cab, does it make sense to ask the cabbie to plug my phone into his lighter so I can charge it?

    Mike
    There are 'chargers' available whereby you do not have to wait to charge your Treo... Treo runs out of battery, plug in the 'charger' and make a call.

    Isn't that the same as plugging in another battery?

    I would expect that this type of charger will be available for the 600.
    www.gsmworld.com
  2.    #22  
    Originally posted by nzmoko


    There are 'chargers' available whereby you do not have to wait to charge your Treo... Treo runs out of battery, plug in the 'charger' and make a call.

    Isn't that the same as plugging in another battery?

    I would expect that this type of charger will be available for the 600.
    It's not really the same thing. If I want to use the PDA during a meeting, I'm supposed to go into the corner and plug the phone in? What if I'm walking around town? Pop in somewhere and try to find a wall outlet? That doesn't make sense. In an emergency yes, it might make a difference, but for ease of use it makes no sense at all. Chargers are not a replacement for spare batteries, period.

    Mike
  3. #23  
    Originally posted by kazinvan


    It's not really the same thing. If I want to use the PDA during a meeting, I'm supposed to go into the corner and plug the phone in? What if I'm walking around town? Pop in somewhere and try to find a wall outlet? That doesn't make sense. In an emergency yes, it might make a difference, but for ease of use it makes no sense at all. Chargers are not a replacement for spare batteries, period.

    Mike
    I think nzmoko meant battery-based chargers. There are some that use AA or 9v batteries. Not elegant by any means, but portable nontheless. They fit somewhere in between AC chargers and a replacement battery on the convenience scale.
  4. #24  
    Originally posted by silverado

    I think nzmoko meant battery-based chargers. There are some that use AA or 9v batteries. Not elegant by any means, but portable nontheless. They fit somewhere in between AC chargers and a replacement battery on the convenience scale.
    This is, indeed, the kind of charger that is available. As for the Treo 600, the "spare battery" charger is a rechargable 1200mAh battery that will power the Treo when the primary battery runs out. Carrying it is no more or less convenient than carrying a spare battery.

    The only thing a replacement battery has over it is the form-factor of the phone doesn't change when you swap batteries.
    --Inspector Gadget

    "Go Go Gadget Pre!!"
    Palm Pre on Sprint

    Palm V--> Palm IIIc--> Visor Prism--> Visor Phone--> Treo 270--> Treo 600--> Treo 650-->
    Treo 700wx--> HTC Touch Diamond--> Palm Pre & HTC EVO 4G.
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    #25  
    Originally posted by Marty1781


    Verizon's CDMA footprint is at least as big as Sprint's CDMA network, likely bigger. So whatever coverage you get with the Treo 600 on Sprint, you will likely get that and then some with the Treo 600 on Verizon. Both cover major metropolitan areas great but Verizon's CDMA coverage tends to extend a little further than Sprint's. I remember one example someone pointed out. Look at the coverage maps for NY state. Sprint's map looks like they took a highlighter and highlighted the major interestates while Verizon's CDMA coverage covers significantly more. Indeed, Verizon isn't touting their "great" network because of how much analog coverage they have, its their large CDMA network that has earned them the reputation of having the largest digital CDMA network in the US.
    I wonder if you are looking at a map that was created after the largest wireless providers negotiated exchange agreements. If Sprint has a reciprocity agreement with Verizon, then I can do "digital roaming" using Verizon's network. My recollection is, each wireless provider has a bigger footprint in at least some parts of the country. It doesn't make any sense to build multiple sets of towers along the Nevada interstates, for example.
  6. #26  
    Originally posted by kazinvan
    SD (Secure Digital) is for memory only.

    SDIO (Secure Digital Input/Output) is for IO operations which allow you to hook up such things as a Bluetooth adapter, WiFi, GPS, digital camera, etc.

    Mike
    Thanks. There is one more thing you could help me out with. What is the difference between a 'SD Card' and a 'SD Expansion Card''? Also what is a 'Mini SD Card' and can one use it with any SD compatible product?
  7.    #27  
    Originally posted by Sanjay
    Thanks. There is one more thing you could help me out with. What is the difference between a 'SD Card' and a 'SD Expansion Card''?
    None that I know of, just semantics.

    Originally posted by Sanjay
    Also what is a 'Mini SD Card' and can one use it with any SD compatible product?
    MiniSD is the new form factor. Available in 16-64 MB (SD in 16-1GB). Smaller to fit into smaller devices. You can use miniSD in an SD slot with an adapter.

    See this document for details.
    http://www.sandisk.com/download/Prod...eet_031303.pdf
  8. #28  
    Originally posted by Iceman6

    I wonder if you are looking at a map that was created after the largest wireless providers negotiated exchange agreements. If Sprint has a reciprocity agreement with Verizon, then I can do "digital roaming" using Verizon's network. My recollection is, each wireless provider has a bigger footprint in at least some parts of the country. It doesn't make any sense to build multiple sets of towers along the Nevada interstates, for example.
    Overall (nationwide), Verizon has the largest digital CDMA network (by far), its as simple as that. Take a look at the current national coverage maps for each company's digital service and you will quickly see in dramatic fashion what I am talking about. Obviously, each provider's coverage will vary from area to area and one will have stronger coverage where the other doesn't, but OVERALL, Verizon has the largest US CDMA network. I'm sure Sprint has recirprocity agreements with Verizon but only in a relatively few select areas (like the Nevade interstates you mentioned) so as even if you count those areas into Sprint's coverage, it still won't be as large as Verizon's network (not even close). Also, unless you have one of Sprint's new singlerate plans, you pay extra when you roam, whether it is analog or digital, it does not matter, you will still pay extra. Anyways, this is getting off-topic. The point is, if you take a Treo 600 and use it on both Sprint and Verizon, nationwide, you will be able to place more calls if you are on the Verizon network than if you are on the Sprint network. Again, take a look at the coverage maps on each company's website and it will become clear very, very quickly.
  9. #29  
    Originally posted by Marty1781


    Overall (nationwide), Verizon has the largest digital CDMA network (by far), its as simple as that. Take a look at the current national coverage maps for each company's digital service and you will quickly see in dramatic fashion what I am talking about. Obviously, each provider's coverage will vary from area to area and one will have stronger coverage where the other doesn't, but OVERALL, Verizon has the largest US CDMA network. I'm sure Sprint has recirprocity agreements with Verizon but only in a relatively few select areas (like the Nevade interstates you mentioned) so as even if you count those areas into Sprint's coverage, it still won't be as large as Verizon's network (not even close). ...snip...
    First, let me say that Verizon's coverage (over-all) is more pervasive in the US than other carriers. That is not in dispute. But the digital coverage is not. Even in some metropolitan areas, my friends' phones ended up on analog because the digital signal was crappy. This will improve over time, but it isn't as good as Verizon would like you to believe.

    At first glance Verizon's national coverage map looks impressive, but take a closer look at the legend for the map. Notice that they use the same color for both their America's Choice All-Digital Rate Area AND their America's Choice Rate Area (the non-digital). They mixed the two together so that you can't really tell where the digital coverage begins and ends. This is ambiguous.

    The red color is used for both services, so which is digital and which is not? You can't really tell.

    Digital wireless is relatively new to the US compared to analog. So don't be misled into thinking that the coverage is going to be as good as the analog. There is still a lot of work to do.
    --Inspector Gadget

    "Go Go Gadget Pre!!"
    Palm Pre on Sprint

    Palm V--> Palm IIIc--> Visor Prism--> Visor Phone--> Treo 270--> Treo 600--> Treo 650-->
    Treo 700wx--> HTC Touch Diamond--> Palm Pre & HTC EVO 4G.
  10. #30  
    Originally posted by Insp_Gadget


    First, let me say that Verizon's coverage (over-all) is more pervasive in the US than other carriers. That is not in dispute. But the digital coverage is not. Even in some metropolitan areas, my friends' phones ended up on analog because the digital signal was crappy. This will improve over time, but it isn't as good as Verizon would like you to believe.

    At first glance Verizon's national coverage map looks impressive, but take a closer look at the legend for the map. Notice that they use the same color for both their America's Choice All-Digital Rate Area AND their America's Choice Rate Area (the non-digital). They mixed the two together so that you can't really tell where the digital coverage begins and ends. This is ambiguous.

    The red color is used for both services, so which is digital and which is not? You can't really tell.
    Unless you have actually used both services (like I have), your arguments regarding your friend's experience really doesn't even hold water. There could have been a number of factors affecting his service, such as his phone. Again, arguements like "my friend's phone", "my coworker told me" etc. don't make much of an argument.

    Second, I'm not sure which coverage map you are looking at but Verizon's AC analog calling areas are clearly marked on the map I am looking at. It makes up a minor portion of their AC calling area. As a matter of simple logic, the "AC All Digital Rate Area" must be the same color as the "AC Rate Area" because the former is part of the latter. The second color they use (the red dotted box) for the "AC Rate Area" is used to signify the analog portion of their AC network where a digital signal is not available (3 different Verizon managers have confirmed this for me), which is very miniscule compared to the rest of the AC digital rate area.

    Again, Sprint's network doesn't even come close in size to Verizon's CDMA network. Verizon acquired multiple carrier's networks thus allowing them to build their CDMA network relatively quickly whereas Sprint started from scratch. It only makes sense that Verizon would have the larger CDMA network and their coverage map proves it. I can't believe we are even debating this.

    In any event, this is still slightly offtopic from the point my original message was trying to convey. The point was that because the Treo 600 will be able to utilize CDMA 1900 and CDMA 800, Carl should also consider Verizon as his carrier because they have a larger CDMA network. Verizon's combined CDMA 1900 and CDMA 800 network is clearly bigger than Sprint's CDMA 1900 only network thus choosing Verizon as the service provider would enable greater voice coverage. That's the only thing I was and still am trying to point out.
    Last edited by Marty1781; 07/03/2003 at 10:06 AM.
  11. #31  
    Originally posted by Marty1781


    Unless you have actually used both services (like I have), your arguments regarding your friend's experience really doesn't even hold water. There could have been a number of factors affecting his service, such as his phone. Again, arguements like "my friend's phone", "my coworker told me" etc. don't make much of an argument.

    Second, I'm not sure which coverage map you are looking at but Verizon's AC analog calling areas are clearly marked on the map I am looking at. It makes up a minor portion of their AC calling area. As a matter of simple logic, the "AC All Digital Rate Area" must be the same color as the "AC Rate Area" because the former is part of the latter. The second color they use (the red dotted box) for the "AC Rate Area" is used to signify the analog portion of their AC network where a digital signal is not available (3 different Verizon managers have confirmed this for me), which is very miniscule compared to the rest of the AC digital rate area.

    Again, Sprint's network doesn't even come close in size to Verizon's CDMA network. Verizon acquired multiple carrier's networks thus allowing them to build their CDMA network relatively quickly whereas Sprint started from scratch. It only makes sense that Verizon would have the larger CDMA network and their coverage map proves it. I can't believe we are even debating this.

    In any event, this is still slightly offtopic from the point my original message was trying to convey. The point was that because the Treo 600 will be able to utilize CDMA 1900 and CDMA 800, Carl should also consider Verizon as his carrier because they have a larger CDMA network. Verizon's combined CDMA 1900 and CDMA 800 network is clearly bigger than Sprint's CDMA 1900 only network thus choosing Verizon as the service provider would enable greater voice coverage. That's the only thing I was and still am trying to point out.
    Actually, I have used Verizon's service (never used Sprint). I don't use Verizon any longer because I am a world traveler and require GSM's capabilities. So speaking in the present tense I referred to my friends who currently use Verizon, and their experience.

    I never said that Verizon's coverage wasn't the largest or the best in the US. The first statement I made was that I agreed that it was the most pervasive. I merely stated that the digital coverage is not as good as their coverage map would lead someone to believe. I also said that it is improving. None of these facts are in dispute.

    As for which coverage map I was looking at. It's this one: Calling Plans: America's Choice

    On this map's legend, I see a total of four colored blocks. Two of the four blocks are the same exact color (I'm using 24-bit color on my display). I understand that the AC Rate Area would also apply to the AC Rate All Digital Area, but since they used the same Red color (I see little dots in both) to indicate the area, how do you know which is digital and which is not? Why the double-use of Red? Why not use a third color (e.g. green) to indicate that both analog and digital are available in a given area? That would be logical.

    The map is ambiguous. That's all I'm saying. It's designed to present the coverage in the best possible light. Most carrier's maps are designed to do that.

    I'm not saying that he shouldn't consider Verizon. I NEVER said that.
    --Inspector Gadget

    "Go Go Gadget Pre!!"
    Palm Pre on Sprint

    Palm V--> Palm IIIc--> Visor Prism--> Visor Phone--> Treo 270--> Treo 600--> Treo 650-->
    Treo 700wx--> HTC Touch Diamond--> Palm Pre & HTC EVO 4G.
  12. #32  
    Originally posted by Insp_Gadget


    Actually, I have used Verizon's service (never used Sprint). I don't use Verizon any longer because I am a world traveler and require GSM's capabilities. So speaking in the present tense I referred to my friends who currently use Verizon, and their experience.

    I never said that Verizon's coverage wasn't the largest or the best in the US. The first statement I made was that I agreed that it was the most pervasive. I merely stated that the digital coverage is not as good as their coverage map would lead someone to believe. I also said that it is improving. None of these facts are in dispute.

    As for which coverage map I was looking at. It's this one: Calling Plans: America's Choice

    On this map's legend, I see a total of four colored blocks. Two of the four blocks are the same exact color (I'm using 24-bit color on my display). I understand that the AC Rate Area would also apply to the AC Rate All Digital Area, but since they used the same Red color (I see little dots in both) to indicate the area, how do you know which is digital and which is not? Why the double-use of Red? Why not use a third color (e.g. green) to indicate that both analog and digital are available in a given area? That would be logical.

    The map is ambiguous. That's all I'm saying. It's designed to present the coverage in the best possible light. Most carrier's maps are designed to do that.

    I'm not saying that he shouldn't consider Verizon. I NEVER said that.
    No you stated that Verizon's DIGITAL (CDMA) coverage is not more pervasive than that of other US carriers (l"et me say that Verizon's coverage (over-all) is more pervasive in the US than other carriers...But the digital coverage is not"). That is wrong. Verizon has by far the mose extensive DIGITAL coverage of any US carrier, period. That is all I've been trying to point out all along and because of that a treo 600 on Verizon would have greater coverage than a Treo 600 on Sprint. If you don't disagree with that then there is no need for this discussion.

    Yes, two of the boxes on the legned are the same color and I have already explained the logical reason behind that. Within that red areas on the map there are no areas that are analog only. The second box for "AC Rate Area" is red dots and I can clearly distinguish the areas in the map that are solid red from those that are dotted red. The dotted red areas are the analog areas that do not have a digital signal but yet are still part of the AC coverage/rate area. So in fact Verizon has distinguished the analog AC areas from the digital AC areas. Again, even though the red appears twice, any solid red on the map is digital. Any dotted red on the map is analog. Underatand? Again, any solid red indicates the presence of a digital signal. Where only analog is available the area is dotted red.

    Finally, if you agree that Verizon has the most extensive DIGTIAL/CDMA network, then there is no point in discussing this any further.
  13. #33  
    Originally posted by kazinvan


    None that I know of, just semantics.



    MiniSD is the new form factor. Available in 16-64 MB (SD in 16-1GB). Smaller to fit into smaller devices. You can use miniSD in an SD slot with an adapter.

    See this document for details.
    http://www.sandisk.com/download/Prod...eet_031303.pdf
    Thanks a ton.
  14. #34  
    Ok, this is on older thread but I have to voice an opinion. You're making coverage claims of Verizon being better than Sprint based on MAPS??? Please. As a manager for a retail company that represents both providers I am in the unique position of selling BOTH on a daily basis. There is no question that Verizon is our "go to" carrier if the customer is in a rural market, but more and more we are noticing a problem. Namely that the phones come back because the customer can't use them where Verizon's map showed coverage. With Sprint yes there are all the problems I've read about on here, no question, but at least when I sell a device to someone in a "yellow" area on the map I KNOW it will work in that area. As far as a larger CDMA footprint I've heard conflicting reports from both sides but the bottom line is this: a tri-mode phone will ALWAYS flip to the strongest signal. ALWAYS. That being the case I wonder how often you actually get CDMA on Verizon? No one seems to be able to answer that one.
  15. #35  
    Originally posted by DrDoom
    Ok, this is on older thread but I have to voice an opinion. You're making coverage claims of Verizon being better than Sprint based on MAPS??? Please. As a manager for a retail company that represents both providers I am in the unique position of selling BOTH on a daily basis. There is no question that Verizon is our "go to" carrier if the customer is in a rural market, but more and more we are noticing a problem. Namely that the phones come back because the customer can't use them where Verizon's map showed coverage. With Sprint yes there are all the problems I've read about on here, no question, but at least when I sell a device to someone in a "yellow" area on the map I KNOW it will work in that area. As far as a larger CDMA footprint I've heard conflicting reports from both sides but the bottom line is this: a tri-mode phone will ALWAYS flip to the strongest signal. ALWAYS. That being the case I wonder how often you actually get CDMA on Verizon? No one seems to be able to answer that one.
    And no one seems to be willing to say that Sprint has the bigger CDMA network. Why? Because they don't, Verizon does. You say you are confident that when you sell a Sprint phone you know it will work in the area the map says it will, great. You also say that some Verizon phones come back because the customer can't get service where the map says they will. So my question to you is when the Verizon customer comes back, do you then proceed to sell them Sprint service? Probably not because if Verizon doesn't cover it in CDMA, chances are pretty high Sprint won't either. Inevitably though, at least some of the rural area customers you sold Verizon service to are happy with their coverage, which would likely not be the case if they had gone with Sprint due to their lack of rural coverage. So even IF the Verizon map may not be completely accurate and cover as much rural area in CDMA as it says it does, some rural areas are still covered in CDMA by Verizon and some rural area is more than the near zero rural area that Sprint covers. Combine that with the near identical metropolitan coverage areas and Verizon still comes out ahead with the bigger CDMA network just because they offer some rural coverage.

    Because not everyone has the luxury of having used both Sprint and Verizon at the same time (as I currently do), the only way to demonstrate what I experience on a daily basis (greater CDMA voice coverage with Verizon) is to reference the maps. So to answer your last question, I get CDMA with Verizon in every place I do with Sprint plus a significant number of other areas where my Sprint phone shows "no service". And yes, the type of coverage I am getting in those Verizon-only areas is CDMA, not analog.

    So like what I told the previous poster, if you do not/have not USED both Sprint and Verizon, arguments like "my customers say", "my friend experienced..." don't even really hold water. You can sell phones/service for every carrier and it still wouldn't matter. Unless you actually personally use (not sell) the services you are commenting on, your coverage comments don't carry any weight.

    Finally, if nothing else, use this simply logic to figure out who has the bigger CDMA network (I am not saying this proves Verizon has the larger CDMA network but it certainly doesn't hurt their case). There is Sprint who built their network from scratch and whose single band phones can work ONLY in a CDMA 1900 area. Then there is Verizon who not only built part of their own network, but acquired previously built CDMA networks and their phones work wherever there is CDMA 1900 OR CDMA 800 coverage. Hmmm, I wonder who has the bigger network
    Last edited by Marty1781; 07/03/2003 at 05:18 PM.
  16. #36  
    Well first off, for a person who seems so sure they're right you do alot of defending your position. Secondly I apologize for not including the fact that I have a Motorola T720c on an account with Verizon as well as Sprint.

    Now, since you want to converse at the adult table, MARTY, I will tell you about MY experience with both. I live in St. Marys, GA. It's located on the beautiful St.Marys river which forms the border for Florida and Georgia. You can't get much more rural than the places I go on a daily basis. In case your interested they are places such as Woodbine, Kingsland, and the not even on a map Browntown. I work down I95 in the rather metropolitan market of Jacksonville, Florida. Not the biggest city in the world, but certainly not rural. Fifty miles away in St.Marys is though.

    Both carriers show that they have wonderful coverage all the way up I95 and well into Savannah eighty miles north of us. So when I first brought home my T720 imagine my surprise when I lost signal fifteen miles south of georgia and didn't get it back until I went back into Jax the next morning. Imagine that.

    Well undaunted I proceeded to have my PRL's updated and that night I did hold signal into georgia. Bravo Verizon. Meanwhile my Treo300 sits on the seat blinking a healthy green. Of course EVERY carrier has a glitch phone now and then, right. So I went on with life, used my T720 and often noticed how much clearer I sounded on Sprint, even though good old T720 showed digital CDMA. Weird.

    Then I got my first bill.

    "What the!?! Doom is displeased!"
    "Thank you for calling Verizon wireless. May I have your mobile number area code first please?"
    "904-#$%-*&^("
    "What seems to be the trouble Mr.-"
    "Doctor"
    "Oh, I'm sorry. What seems to be the trouble Dr. Mc-"
    "Doom."
    "Doom?"
    "Yes, Doctor Doom. Anyway, I just got a bill from you and it shows me with over three hundred minutes of roaming charges."
    "Yes, well, we show that you were roaming for all of that time."
    "Well my phone said I wasn't."
    "Huh. Well let me check something.(hold music). Dr? You were right, we show that the roaming indicator never went off."
    "So I don't need to pay these then?"
    "Well no sir you still need to pay them. After all you were roaming."
    "Can I ask you a question?"
    "Yes sir."
    "If you told your child not to touch a hot stove, but he still does, whose fault is that?"
    "Well, his I suppose."
    "And if you didn't warn him and he did it?"
    "Mine."
    "Then how is it my fault that I was roaming?"
    "Because you...well...I tell you what sir. I'll split them with you."
    "You really are a peach ma'am."
    "I'm just trying to help sir."
    "Well thanks anyway."

    Verizon has the largest all digital...heehee...hahahaha...can't even keep a straight...HAHAHA.

    "Can you hear me now?"
    "Well yes but you're paying through the nose for it."
    "Good."
  17. #37  
    Originally posted by DrDoom
    Well first off, for a person who seems so sure they're right you do alot of defending your position. Secondly I apologize for not including the fact that I have a Motorola T720c on an account with Verizon as well as Sprint.

    Now, since you want to converse at the adult table, MARTY, I will tell you about MY experience with both. I live in St. Marys, GA. It's located on the beautiful St.Marys river which forms the border for Florida and Georgia. You can't get much more rural than the places I go on a daily basis. In case your interested they are places such as Woodbine, Kingsland, and the not even on a map Browntown. I work down I95 in the rather metropolitan market of Jacksonville, Florida. Not the biggest city in the world, but certainly not rural. Fifty miles away in St.Marys is though.

    Both carriers show that they have wonderful coverage all the way up I95 and well into Savannah eighty miles north of us. So when I first brought home my T720 imagine my surprise when I lost signal fifteen miles south of georgia and didn't get it back until I went back into Jax the next morning. Imagine that.

    Well undaunted I proceeded to have my PRL's updated and that night I did hold signal into georgia. Bravo Verizon. Meanwhile my Treo300 sits on the seat blinking a healthy green. Of course EVERY carrier has a glitch phone now and then, right. So I went on with life, used my T720 and often noticed how much clearer I sounded on Sprint, even though good old T720 showed digital CDMA. Weird.

    Verizon has the largest all digital...heehee...hahahaha...can't even keep a straight...HAHAHA.
    Like I said before, some areas will be better served by one provider than by the other.

    Second, the Motorola T270 is, unfortunately, well-known for its problems on Verizon so it did not surprise me when I read your episode. I have read countless episodes of similar situations with that phone which is why I never considered it as a phone for my personal use.

    As far as me doing a lot of defending of my position, I don't think so. If the stance I am taking is so wrong or even somewhat debatable, I know I would be getting seriously flamed (as opposed to the 1-3 daily responses I get). Take a look at one of the other threads where the poster thinks the Hitachi G1000 is better than the Treo. That stance was obviously highly debatable and many, many people let him know that to say the least. Here, that is not the case. I wonder why.

    BTW, you still never answered my previous question. When the rural area Verizon customers comes back dissatisfied with their coverage, do you attempt to then sell them Sprint service? Didn't think so (because it is highly likely that if Verizon doesn't cover it in CDMA, forget about Sprint). There's a reason why Verizon is your go-to carrier for rural area customers and why you recommend them (from what it seems) by default for those kind of customers. So what if some of them come back dissatisfied with their coverage. The real question is if you sold Sprint service to those customers in the first place, how many would come back then? Why don't you recommend Sprint to them instead to start out with? Then you just wait and see how many of them come back.

    We all know metropolitan area CDMA coverage is pretty even between the two companies (heck, even the GSM companies cover those well). So what does that leave to decide who has the larger CDMA network, that would be rural areas. So are you telling me Sprint offers more overall rural CDMA coverage than Verizon? I hope not.

    Sprint has rural coverage "....heehee...hahahaha...can't even keep a straight...HAHAHA."
  18. #38  
    I'm getting tired head from all this back and forth with who has the most coverage.
    Can we move on?
  19. #39  
    yeah, neither of these are on topic and should probably be posted in a more general forum.
  20.    #40  
    Yes, I started this tread to see what people thought about the Kyocera vs Handspring debate, I'm not sure how that got morphed into Sprint vs Verizon. There are a ton of threads on that topic, I don't want to create a new one.
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