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  1.    #1  
    One thing I think people aren't paying enough attention to is the one button launch feature.

    "For example, phone numbers, applications and even specific application functions (such as looking up a specific web page or addressing an email) can be assigned to any of 26 different keys for instant one-touch execution."

    So to call your Mom you hold down the "M" button. To check traffic on a webpage, you hold down the "T" button. To email your boss, you hold down the "B" button and then start typing. The opportunities are endless (well, not endless.... you can have 26). And you can do all this without looking. Fantastic feature. This is the kind of innovation I expect from an intellectual property company like Handspring.
  2. #2  
    Couldn't agree more Kurt! You get the feeling that the design team was actually thinking of how people would benefit from using this device, rather than just adding features for the sake of features. The more I read about this device the more I'm sure it will be perfect for me and (for the first time) perfect for my wife as well. Now that's a feat!
    go.digital
  3. #3  
    Originally posted by KRamsauer
    To email your boss, you hold down the "B" button and then start typing. The opportunities are endless (well, not endless.... you can have 26). And you can do all this without looking. Fantastic feature. This is the kind of innovation I expect from an intellectual property company like Handspring.
    I doubt you can find the "B" button on your curent treo without looking with any regularity, and that is unlikely to improve with an even smaller keyboard.

    The new article on the Treo 600 is very detailed, but...

    What are the Treo 600's dimensions? Weight? Anyone?
  4. #4  
    I think it's great that they're adding support for system-wide hotkeys. All of those keys are so tempting to be used for instant access to information.

    Even simple hotkeys can make a huge difference in usability. I check my mail so often, that I finally mapped the 'q' key to turn off the device since it is so easy to hit with the right thumb. Unfortunately can't get it to turn *on* the device with standard calls. I thought I'd be able to, with HsKeySetMaskExt(), especially because you can wake up the device with key combos such as opt+home. But I couldn't get it to work with regular keys.

    Hmm, maybe there should be a switcheroo option to use opt+home instead of opt+space. That way it would wake up the device too.

    Edited because I said KeyCapsHack instead of switcheroo.
    Last edited by potatoho; 06/18/2003 at 05:16 PM.
  5. #5  
    It also appears that you can put shortcuts to apps and other things inside the speed-dial buckets in the phone app. And from some of the screencaps, there is also a little shortcut menu that is accessible via the D-pad. Where each push in a certain direction launches a specific app.
  6. #6  
    The Handspring guy in the cnet interview seemed to indicate that there would be a floating cursor that you could control with the D pad, and then by pressing the center of the D pad you would be choosing and launching items, similar to the point and click method of a computer today.

    Anybody else pick up on that?

    Cluemeister
  7. #7  
    Since I used the device, what I think the guy was referring to was the fact that the various fields on screen are 'active' to be selected by the d-pad. That's how it worked when I used it at the Sprint PCS show.
    (as one of my earlier posts indicated - say goodbye to PowerJog - you won't need it)

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