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  1.    #1  
    Like alot of people here, I've been kinda bummed about the screen resolution on the new Treo 600. However there is one feature that I think may still sway me in its favor and that is its future compatibilty with Sprint's location based services (i.e. live, updating driving directions). Apparently Sprint is scheduled to release this service sometime early next year and I was wondering if the new Treo would be compatible with this service? According to infomation posted , this gpsOne technolgy uses both tower triangulation and GPS signals. The towers transmit your signal strength to a server that uses the GPS receiver on the tower as well as your signal strength to get a fix on your location. This technolgy is similar to the E911 implementation. The advantage to Sprint's implementation is that the phone can use this location data with applications to provide things like driving directions. ( Just to be clear, the phone itself is not a GPS receiver)

    What I was wonder about is whether existing/upcoming vision phones like the Treo 600 will be compatible with gpsOne? Also, will this future service be somehow compatible with various GPS-specific maps/apps available for PalmOS. More specifically, I wonder whether this feature will work only via proprietary location-based services sold by Sprint? And if not, then could it be possible to somehow get a direct NMEA data feed from the Sprint server, then you could use it with any other compatible application! Thus the app gets the NMEA data from the server, and the phone continues to transmit location data to the server. This would be an ultimate killer feature IMO! Of course it would still suck to view all those maps on the 160x160 screen, but I could live with that if it meant I had a integrated GPS functionality!

    Any thoughts?
    Last edited by Gaurav; 06/10/2003 at 11:59 PM.
  2. #2  
    Unlike some other carriers, Sprint committed to meeting the FCC's E911 mandate with a "handset" based solution, which also utilizes some triangulation. This "GPS One" technolgy they license from Snaptrack, a Qualcomm subsidiary.
    This technology is built into Qualcomm's chipsets, which are basically the microprocessor brains for most sprint phones.

    This handset solution to location based services is significantly more precise than the technology to be used by say, AT&T, which is based, I believe, strictly on triangulation.

    As long as the 600 uses a Qualcomm chipset, then Sprint's location-based services will work, with no additional hardware, with the 600.

    I'd be very surprised if the 600 does not use a Qualcomm 5000 series chipset, which is their 3G chipset. We should be able to tell, however, from the FCC filings which have internal photos of the phone's guts.

    I've checked this on the 300 and it looks like a Qualcomm chipset.
  3. #3  
    ...I believe that the Treo 300 has this, and it ain't bought us anything yet. Don't quote me on this, but I seem to remember that "location-based services" (a euphomism for GPSone) was one of the features.

    What I do know is that, for cell phones that currently have GPSone, their doesn't seem to be a software interface to it, from the cell phone's stand point at least. GPSone technology seems to be geared exclusively (so far) for location aware web/WAP site and call centers. If you had visions of maping software or driving directions, similar to the new Garmin unit, you can give that one up.
  4. #4  
    It doesn't work anywhere, yet, I don't think.

    The last I heard, E911 was only working in Rhode Island, which has only one cell tower, and Houston.

    I believe E911 has to come first. Most states aren't doing their parts though in setting up the infrastructure.

    At any rate, Sprint's all digital CDMA network will allow it's location based services to work better than other carriers.

    There's big money in this, so it will come out.
  5.    #5  
    Originally posted by Stickman
    It doesn't work anywhere, yet, I don't think.

    The last I heard, E911 was only working in Rhode Island, which has only one cell tower, and Houston.

    I believe E911 has to come first. Most states aren't doing their parts though in setting up the infrastructure.

    At any rate, Sprint's all digital CDMA network will allow it's location based services to work better than other carriers.

    There's big money in this, so it will come out.
    So does this mean that the E911 sys will be up way before we ever see the location-based services functionality? Do you have an idea of when Sprint plans roll out this service nationally...

    Also, why couldn't it be possible to wirte some sort of app to convert the server feed to NMEA compatible? That shouldn't be too hard should it? Having iQue like functionality on the Treo 600 would be joy!

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