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  1.    #1  
    Well Sprint finally posted the phone on its site. I dunno who the heck would pay $600 bucks for this ( ) but if it comes down to ~$300 bucks I might get one of these. Of course I know I should wait for the new Treo later this year, but thw new gadget bug is afflicting me pretty badly right now! I have a shared plan and not everyone in my family wants "clunky" keypad to deal with (not my words). Thus this seems like a great and sleek palmOs smartphone alternative...alot smaller than the 7135... Any one else agree?
  2. #2  
    Originally posted by gfunkmagic
    Well Sprint finally posted the phone on its site. I dunno who the heck would pay $600 bucks for this ( ) but if it comes down to ~$300 bucks I might get one of these. Of course I know I should wait for the new Treo later this year, but thw new gadget bug is afflicting me pretty badly right now! I have a shared plan and not everyone in my family wants "clunky" keypad to deal with (not my words). Thus this seems like a great and sleek palmOs smartphone alternative...alot smaller than the 7135... Any one else agree?
    A "smartphone" without a thumbboard doesn't seem very smart to me.
    Surprised Kyocera's new smartphone also chose a hard phonepad over a thumbboard.
    Treo 600 - what a "Marvel"ous device!
  3.    #3  
    Originally posted by NateS


    A "smartphone" without a thumbboard doesn't seem very smart to me.
    Surprised Kyocera's new smartphone also chose a hard phonepad over a thumbboard.
    Like I said, not everyone's preference is for a thumboard. I know lots of people who don't buy a Treo specifically b/c it has a thumboard. Thus the choice is a matter of preference and need. I personally agree with you that a keypad/thumboard option is a necessity in a smartphone, but there is also a large market for users whose primary preference is for size and portability. Thus they want more phone-centric devices and are willing to omit thumboards. Devices like the SPH-i500, SGH-i500, 7135, GSL Onynx and Zircon and etc fit this bill exactly. Thus to say a smartphone w/o a thumboard isn't very smart is a very skewed and narrow perspective. It may not be smart for YOU but very convenient for someone else. Its all about diversity of choices. Anyway like I said, I like thumboards but other people on my shared plan don't and this would seem like a good choice..
    Last edited by Gaurav; 05/25/2003 at 02:09 PM.
  4. #4  
    a pda without a thumbboard is as useful as a gun without bullets...it can look menacing, but can't get the job done.

    also I think samsung can makea good phone, I'll wait for the next Treo. The more I use my Treo, the more I realize that it's a good compromise between pda and phone. I primarily use it as a pda, and have a sep. phone...Sprint's add a phone and cheap vision make it a total bargain.

    give me a pda with a decent keyboard (treo, palm, blackberry are good...sony are all bad, esp the new tg-50), sprint network, wi-fi, and bluetooth, and a good form factor, and I'm there.

    until then, I dream.
  5. #5  
    Originally posted by gfunkmagic


    Like I said, not everyone's preference is for a thumboard. I know lots of people who don't buy a Treo specifically b/c it has a thumboard. Thus the choice is a matter of preference and need. I personally agree with you that a keypad/thumboard option is a necessity in a smartphone, but there is also a large market for users whose primary preference is for size and portability. Thus they want more phone-centric devices and are willing to give omit thumboards. Devices like the SPH-i500, SGH-i500, 7135, GSL Onynx and Zircon and etc fit this bill exactly. Thus to say a smartphone w/o a thumboard isn't very smart is a very skewed and narrow perspective. It may not be smart for YOU but very convenient for someone else. Its all about diversity of choices. Anyway like I said, I like thumboards but other people on my shared plan don't and this would seem like a good choice..
    You may be right, but my hunch is that it is a matter of not knowing what they are missing. I wonder if there are any consumers who have had a device with a built-in thumbboard who have decided that, on their next device, they want to go back to graffiti. Not too many I would bet.

    I was very good at graffiti on my Palm IIIc, and pretty fast. I added RechEcho right after I got my Treo, thinking I would continue to use graffiti in most instances, but it never happened because thumbboarding turned out to be so much more effective and handier than I thought it was going to be. Like most people, I thought my thumbs would hit two keys at a time but it never happened.

    In addition, I would not be at all surprised if the next version of the Kyocera has a thumbboard, would you? (Not sure about the Samsung because of its smaller dimensions.)

    Regards,

    NateS
    Treo 600 - what a "Marvel"ous device!
  6. #6  
    Most people, who are pda pros, who use a thumbboard never go back to graffiti again.
    Most people who are Joe Public prefer thumbboards over graffiti because it's an easier interface and faster.
    As was mentioned above,most people just have not tried them. I think the price point keeps them out of reach, although that is changing of late.
    Thumbboard turn this device into a more productive tool...I can enter contacts, notes, instant messages and emails as a speed that can't be touched by writing/graffiti.
    Maybe for the occasional user, graffiti is fine, but if you keep your life in your pda, the thumbboard is the way to go.
  7. #7  
    Originally posted by NateS
    I wonder if there are any consumers who have had a device with a built-in thumbboard who have decided that, on their next device, they want to go back to graffiti. Not too many I would bet.
    I went from a Samsung I300 to a Treo 300 to a Kyocera 7135. I truly did enjoy the thumboard and even though the Treo 300 offered numberous ways to dial a phone number, for me, nothing beats a real hard phone keypad. While that alone was not enough to make me switch, when the 7135 addressed other shortcomings that I felt the Treo 300 had and offered a Stowaway keyboard as an option, I felt those added features outweighed the Treo's keyboard and thus I made the decision to switch. I can see though how for users who enter large amounts of info into their PDA while away from their computer how a QWERTY keyboard is an absolute must have.
  8. #8  
    If you are using the device as your main phone, and can see how a phone keypad is preferred vs. a keyboard. Even though I have a Treo and use it constantly, I still have a separate 'regular' phone.
  9. #9  
    Originally posted by mikec
    Most people, who are pda pros, who use a thumbboard never go back to graffiti again.
    Most people who are Joe Public prefer thumbboards over graffiti because it's an easier interface and faster.
    As was mentioned above,most people just have not tried them. I think the price point keeps them out of reach, although that is changing of late.
    Thumbboard turn this device into a more productive tool...I can enter contacts, notes, instant messages and emails as a speed that can't be touched by writing/graffiti.
    Maybe for the occasional user, graffiti is fine, but if you keep your life in your pda, the thumbboard is the way to go.
    In addition, I use Agendus, so as soon as I start typing a contact name into a new appointment entry, I get a pop-up list of probables, and I also use WordComplete similarly everywhere else. In effect, the stylus tip works together with the thumbboard, as sort of a mouse for selections from pop-up menus. If Palm does a better job adding system-wide jogwheel control to their operating system, even the stylus would get considerably less use, which would be fine with me. (Or maybe Handspring needs to implement it more effectively?)

    Regards,

    NateS
    Treo 600 - what a "Marvel"ous device!

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