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  1.    #1  
    Today I was reading an email on my Treo 300 and it included some URLs of screenshots on a web page.

    I knew I'd be in for trouble trying to view them with Blazer or Xiino, since their web proxies always scale down large images to fit within 160x160 (and these screenshots contained text that would be impossible to read when scaled down). Figured I'd try them anyway, though.

    Tried Blazer first, since it's more conservative than Xiino about scaling images down (Xiino scales down unconditionally, while Blazer only scales down images that don't already fit within 160x160), but as it turns out, it performed worse than Xiino for these images, which were taller than they were wide. Blazer's proxy scaled down the image so that the entire thing fit on the page, whereas Xiino only scaled it so that the full width would fit on the page, and then allowed vertical scrolling.

    Both of them did too much scaling for me to read the text in the screenshot, though, as I was expecting. The only option I could come up with for downloading the images at full size and panning around them was ZFrame, but it was so slow and clunky (especially when trying to pan) that it was barely worth it.

    Is there a JPEG viewer out there (preferably also with GIF and PNG viewing capability) that has the ability to download images to view over HTTP? I looked at the web pages of all the image viewers that SnapperMail supports, but none of them appeared to have this capability.

    As a rather painful workaround, I could log into my webserver via SSH, wget the image, convert it to a PDB file, download that PDB with Xiino, then open it with one of the JPEG viewers, but I'm not sure what software would be used for the conversion to PDB, and whether it'd need to be specific to a particular viewing program...
  2. #2  
    Originally posted by Dan Harkless
    As a rather painful workaround, I could log into my webserver via SSH, wget the image, convert it to a PDB file, download that PDB with Xiino, then open it with one of the JPEG viewers, but I'm not sure what software would be used for the conversion to PDB, and whether it'd need to be specific to a particular viewing program...
    I had a similar thought. But rather than convert it to PDB and download it with Xiino, you could email it to yourself and open it with SnapperMail/JPEGWatchLite.

    Scott
  3. #3  
    And along those same lines...Rather than log into your webserver via SSH, could you just create a simple web form where you enter the URL of the image in a text box and click on the "Submit" button which would trigger sending you the email?

    Scott
  4.    #4  
    Originally posted by Scott R
    I had a similar thought. But rather than convert it to PDB and download it with Xiino, you could email it to yourself and open it with SnapperMail/JPEGWatchLite.
    That's true. Unfortunately I can't use SnapperMail for my main email program because I require SSL support (thus I use Eudora), but I suppose I could purchase SnapperMail and use it in conjunction with my Sprint email account (which I don't otherwise use).

    Still, fairly long and awkward workaround...
  5.    #5  
    Originally posted by Scott R
    And along those same lines...Rather than log into your webserver via SSH, could you just create a simple web form where you enter the URL of the image in a text box and click on the "Submit" button which would trigger sending you the email?
    Yeah, the idea of a CGI had occurred to me, but I hadn't thought about it too deeply. Combined with the send-by-email/SnapperMail method you suggest, that wouldn't be prohibitively awkward or drawn-out.

    Thanks for the suggestions. If there's no other solution, I'll certainly look into setting this up.
  6. #6  
    Originally posted by Dan Harkless
    Yeah, the idea of a CGI had occurred to me, but I hadn't thought about it too deeply. Combined with the send-by-email/SnapperMail method you suggest, that wouldn't be prohibitively awkward or drawn-out.

    Thanks for the suggestions. If there's no other solution, I'll certainly look into setting this up.
    Not sure if it really saves any/many steps, but it would probably be a tad quicker (though adding a level of complexity to set it all up)...You could also create a PQA which interfaced with your CGI (or, if I was doing it, PHP) page. So, you'd copy the URL out of the source email, launch the PQA, plug in the URL, click "OK" (which would call the backend script page firing off an email with the JPEG attachment). Then, launch email program again to get the new email with attachment. Of course, this should work for any sort of file you want to get down to your Palm, not just JPEGs.

    Here's another approach: You could have a desktop computer running with a VNC app on your Palm. Of course, that would probably be just as bad or worse than your original ZFrame method.

    Hmm...Now that I'm thinking through things...Are there any other browsers that won't resize images? It's a shame that PocketLink (which claims not to use a proxy server) still seems to shrink images down. You'd think it would have an option to let you scroll around the screen.

    Scott
  7.    #7  
    Originally posted by Scott R
    Not sure if it really saves any/many steps, but it would probably be a tad quicker (though adding a level of complexity to set it all up)...You could also create a PQA which interfaced with your CGI (or, if I was doing it, PHP) page. So, you'd copy the URL out of the source email, launch the PQA, plug in the URL, click "OK" (which would call the backend script page firing off an email with the JPEG attachment).
    Yes, creating a PQA would save some time over using a bookmark in Blazer / Eudora / Xiino. Not sure how involved PQA creation is, though...

    Then, launch email program again to get the new email with attachment. Of course, this should work for any sort of file you want to get down to your Palm, not just JPEGs.
    Yes, good point. Occasionally I'll download some application's demo PRC over the network with Xiino and install it, but that's not possible if the PRC is in a Zip file. In the past I've used the SSH method and commandline "unzip" to get around this, but that would be unnecessary with this web-emailing form.

    Here's another approach: You could have a desktop computer running with a VNC app on your Palm. Of course, that would probably be just as bad or worse than your original ZFrame method.
    Yes, I would imagine so.

    Hmm...Now that I'm thinking through things...Are there any other browsers that won't resize images? It's a shame that PocketLink (which claims not to use a proxy server) still seems to shrink images down. You'd think it would have an option to let you scroll around the screen.
    That is odd, isn't it? Of course it's a moot point, since PocketLink is pathologically slow at rendering images on the Treo 270/300's 12-bit display.
  8. #8  
    You know what I would like. A palm browser that you set up using your existing pc where you would point out only which parts of your favorite web pages you want formatted into your palm browser... that way you could always access your favorite pages, and it would be a much easier download and probably a simpler format cause most of us don't need much graphics when viewing on a palm device.... Kind of like what Blazer does except you would point out what to cut and what to paste into the screen.
  9. #9  
    gentlemen

    don't know if this helps, but take a look at it

    http://www.embisoft.com/ipanel/beta_release.htm

    a version for the treo's will be available my mid year, so I've been told
  10. #10  
    Originally posted by sleibow
    gentlemen

    don't know if this helps, but take a look at it

    http://www.embisoft.com/ipanel/beta_release.htm

    a version for the treo's will be available my mid year, so I've been told
    I'm pretty sure that this is the browser that comes bundled with the Kyocera 7135. Has anyone heard anything about how good that browser is from owners of the 7135?

    BTW, getting kind of off-topic, but...I emailed the makers of Thunderhawk, a proxy-based browser for the PPC which allows you to use the PPC in landscape format (320x240). I have not tried this browser personally (though I've been meaning to, since I have a Compaq iPaq lying around), but a lot of people love it. It's claim to fame is that they make use of sub-pixel rendering, landscape, custom (small) fonts, and other tricks to do a very good job of displaying web pages as if you were viewing them on a desktop. They informed me that they are working on a Palm version of this browser. Of course, I don't expect that they can work miracles at 160x160 resolution, so this will probably be geared towards 320x320 devices and, perhaps, using devices like the Sony NR/NX/NZ-series in landscape format (480x320).

    Scott

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