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  1.    #1  
    I am having difficulties fetching my email using several email programs for my treo 300. Here's the deal:

    I tried the pop-way, and it was notorious for fetching everything appointments, tasks, calendaring items but not what I need, namely, emails only.

    Someone suggested IMAP. I downloaded an email program that handles IMAP, and am wondering what I need from my IT person re configuring IMAP. Does the IT-person need to do anything to the server? Are POP and IMAP configurations mutually exclusive? In other words, we do have POP-capabilities, but I am wondering if so, then can I not use IMAP since my firm's uses the pop-method? If we can use IMAP, what will my IT person need to do the server to allow me access?

    Thank you,
    Katherine
  2. #2  
    An IMAP server is different than a POP server. Depending, on what that server is, it might just be a matter of turning that service on.

    Ask your IT person if the server supports this or not. You should not have to tell the person how to do this, they are in fact the IT person, and should know how.
  3. ignar's Avatar
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    #3  
    They are not the same, but both can be supported at the same time. I always wonder why IMAP is a lot less popular than Pop3 is when IMAP is a way way better protocol.
  4. #4  
    Have read that IMAP is both harder to set up and hungrier on resources than POP. Dunno how true that is, although I have set up an IMAP service on my FreeBSD box. Haven't really tried it out though. Besides, I think that even users who have access to IMAP servers still retrieve their mail using POP. Go figure.

    Regards
  5. #5  
    Uhm, not sure now that all IMAP mail servers allow retrieval by POP-only clients. imap.graffiti.net, for instance, doesn't seem to respond to the POP3 handshaking, and might allow access only via an IMAP client.
  6. #6  
    Originally posted by Silverlokk
    Have read that IMAP is both harder to set up and hungrier on resources than POP. Dunno how true that is, although I have set up an IMAP service on my FreeBSD box. Haven't really tried it out though. Besides, I think that even users who have access to IMAP servers still retrieve their mail using POP. Go figure.

    Regards
    IMAP = email stored on the server
    POP = email stored on the client

    That is one of the fundamental design differences and easily points to IMAP being resource hungry.

    POP was really designed just for a delivery method - you POP in and pull all mail down and then delete it.

    IMAP is design to allow concurrent users to work with the same email account. It's a centralized server model. I have a friend who has 4GB of mail on his server (a few years of email) and it's great for him - he can search back into the past for messages no matter what computer he might be on.

    -W
    Will Lau


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  7. #7  
    Originally posted by snapperfish


    IMAP = email stored on the server
    POP = email stored on the client

    That is one of the fundamental design differences and easily points to IMAP being resource hungry.

    POP was really designed just for a delivery method - you POP in and pull all mail down and then delete it.

    IMAP is design to allow concurrent users to work with the same email account. It's a centralized server model. I have a friend who has 4GB of mail on his server (a few years of email) and it's great for him - he can search back into the past for messages no matter what computer he might be on.

    -W
    will:

    true, but the aspect of imap that's often misunderstood is that it's not like running pine via telnet, where messages are *only* on the server, and you have to be connected to do useful work. any decent imap client caches messages on the client, so you can do all kinds of stuff--read, move, delete, reply, compose--even when you're off line. to me, the clearest metaphor is one of synching. you basically sync your email account with the server whenever you connect.

    imap is the best way to go for anyone who uses multiple devices to do email, imho.

    you're absolutely correct, however, that it can hog disk space because of the copies of the messages on the server.

    p

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