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  1.    #1  
    I'll probably get flamed for this, but here goes. I waited 12 months for the Treo, then continued to wait impatiently after that for the 300. I bought my 300 the second week it was out, paid full price too. I have espoused it's value to everyone. I love the concept, the convergence and the capabilities. I just don't feel like it's ready for prime time.

    I'm tired of my phone roaming when there's a perfectly good Sprint signal - I'm tired of having to turn it off and then back on to stop it from roaming. I'm tired of not being able to connect to vision - I'm tired of having to turn it off and on to force vision to reconnect. I'm tired of apps having no clue whether vision is up or down and then just timing out because they don't know what to do. I'm tired of Sprint technicians that have no idea about anything when you call for tech support. I'm tired of stupid apps generating fatal exceptions that take the whole system down!

    The phone is a mission critical application, it needs to work all the time - irregardless of whether or not AIM is getting along with Treo Button or not. I can't believe that any misbehaving app can trash the entire unit. I write code for a living, on a variety of platforms (though not Palm). I'll be honest and say I have written some pretty miserable code on occasions, but I've never come close to taking down an entire OS. If Palm OS is legitimately that unstable then it's the wrong OS for this environment, period.

    I don't think that a $500 phone should be made of plastic - but if it has to be then I think the plastic should be colored straight through, not painted. How many people have all the paint worn off all the corners of their phone like mine? What about the back, is it scratched and worn revealing the white plastic underneath like mine? A phone goes with you more places then a PDA, and it goes into many more environments - it needs to be built tougher then a Visor, but it's not.

    I feel let down, really disappointed with Handspring. I'm not sure what I'm going to do, but I'm definetely in the market for a new device.


    Dunc

  2. jmw
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    #2  
    Originally posted by Dunc
    I'll probably get flamed for this, but here goes. I waited 12 months for the Treo, then continued to wait impatiently after that for the 300. I bought my 300 the second week it was out, paid full price too. I have espoused it's value to everyone. I love the concept, the convergence and the capabilities. I just don't feel like it's ready for prime time.

    I'm tired of my phone roaming when there's a perfectly good Sprint signal - I'm tired of having to turn it off and then back on to stop it from roaming. I'm tired of not being able to connect to vision - I'm tired of having to turn it off and on to force vision to reconnect. I'm tired of apps having no clue whether vision is up or down and then just timing out because they don't know what to do. I'm tired of Sprint technicians that have no idea about anything when you call for tech support. I'm tired of stupid apps generating fatal exceptions that take the whole system down!

    That sucks you're having so many problems. I don't think most people have so much trouble. For instance, once i connect to vision, it stays connected until I make or receive a phone call (or i manually disconnect). All the apps I use know how to dial vision, and know when they need to dial. Never needed to turn the phone off and on.

    I think your roaming problem is easily solved. Go to the phone app, "Call Preferences" menu, and turn off "Digital Roaming". That's all you need to do to force it to use the sprint signal. I generally leave it in sprint-only mode.

    As for crashes, well, if an app can't behave, get rid of it.

    jmw
  3. #3  
    i agree that the vision connection does not work the way we would like based on what we all have gotten used to with high speed web connections. 'always on' is sort of an exaggeration and i agree that some apps have trouble bringing the connection back around when it has 'gone to gray'. i use blazer to disconnect and then reconnect when i want to go back on.

    as for roaming, one of the first things i did was change the setting to 'no digital roaming' because of a thread on this board that indicated this was one of the big reasons for premature battery drain.

    i also agree about the quality of the case. how much extra could it possibly have been to have a case that would look decent more than a few months...

    still, the treo is amazing, and it can only get better from here!
    Change is a challenge to the adventurous, an opportunity to the alert, a threat to the insecure.
  4. #4  
    I've had my Treo since Sept. and it still looks brand new, I treat it like a $500 device. As for the crashes, I've had some, but noticed getting rid of a lot of small third party apps helps. That's where most of the bad code is.
  5. #5  
    Originally posted by imageone
    I've had my Treo since Sept. and it still looks brand new, I treat it like a $500 device. As for the crashes, I've had some, but noticed getting rid of a lot of small third party apps helps. That's where most of the bad code is.
    I've had my Treo 300 since the first week it was released (I think it was August) and my device is beginning to look beat up. I use the belt holster and the silver paint is coming off the back and a little bit off the front. While I would have liked the color to be all the way through the plastic, the paint coming off isn't a big problem.

    I agree on the crashes thing; I keep my device pretty lean and mean and rarely crash.

    Yes, I did pay $500 for my device and would gladly pay it again. Of all the devices I've owned and used, I think that the Treo 300 is the best. While there are some things I would like the device to have, I know that it will be a long time before I get everything in one device.
  6. #6  
    I have to say I'm with Dunc. None of the three devices I replace with my Treo suffered anywhere near the quality, software, and connectivity issues I've had. I just wish it were a little more fully-baked.
  7. #7  
    My opinion is that Palm software has very much improved in stability from the pre Y2K time. The only resets I get now are soft-resets which are apparently supposed to happen during some network connection issues. I don't like that design, and I do hope they make the firmware more robust to better handle whatever network condition causes that.

    Contrast to the olden days where just dropping the device would fling batteries everywhere and near-instantly lose the RAM contents. I actually feel pretty confident in my 300 that it will remain functional without having to baby it.

    Though there was one time a few weeks ago where I woke up and it wouldn't turn on at all! Reset pin just resulted in a purple screen. Nothing I could do but disassemble and unplug/plug the battery. That fixed it, and I had to sync to get my stuff back. I'm attributing that to a possible 110v glitch since I had been leaving it plugged into the charger all night. I tend not to do that any more, though it was probably just a freak thing.

    So my current setup is like this to make the system reliable:

    I installed Crash Hack, which is fantastic because it all but eliminates the need for hitting a reset pin. It will make a log entry whenever there is a fatal error of any kind (I'm a developer and hence I use this to track obscure long-usage errors which don't show up in POSE), and what application was active, and also log any soft resets which have occurred.. and then optionally after a timeout will reset the system.

    The second thing was to install Scott's TreoTools. This allows the wireless to auto-reconnect after a reset. Supposing your Treo is in your pocket or belt and it does a reset because of the Sprint network issue or whatnot -- well, TreoTools is a solution for not missing any calls after that fact. It also lets you assign a schedule of on/off times for the wireless.

    So between TreoTools and Crash Hack I have a pretty reliable setup. Now keep in mind that my Treo does a ton of networking all day long, 300+ emails, and various SMS due to email triggers and VeriChat.. so it's just a matter of time IMO that the network bugs catch up with the device.
  8. #8  
    Man I love my device and the service from Sprint. I WILL admit that this thing is not for everyone, and certainly not for most folks who are not Palm-familiar. I've used wireless Palm stuff for about 3 years, and I think the Treo300 along with the data service in unlimited mode is pretty close to awesome.
    Just my opinion though.
  9. #9  
    I bought my Treo in October, and I'd never owned a palm. Newbie though I may be, I love this device and, while I agree that it is not quite as stable as my Linux or Win2K systems, it is much more usable and useful than I imagined it would be when I bought it.

    I had a Sprint TP3000 prior, which synced with Outlook and gave me very stripped-down Palm-like capability. The Treo address book - largely due to the shortcut lookup from the speed dial screen - is probably the killer feature. with over 200 addresses in my address book, I never have to scroll. The supplied datebook is full-featured, easy to navigate, and meets all of my needs. The web browsing is less useful, but worlds better than the 14.4-equivalent wap browsing on the Touchpoint.

    Somehow, Color makes a huge difference in the appeal and usability of the device. And, man, pseudo-graffiti and the keyboard. I got very fast at the pop-up screen keyboard on the touchpoint, but it was very easy to abandon. Also killer are those apps that I lived without for years but seem to live in now - um, Niggle, Spellbound, Lingo. This thing is heaven for a long-time crossword freak.

    I am far less distressed by the usability issues than I am by some of the short--sighted design issues, like building the battery - and therefore, obsolescence - into the device, and the lack of an expansion slot. I'm still a little fuzzy on why I would need my phone to be a camera, but an MP3 player would be very cool.

    But the Treo seems to do right what all of the others completely miss - it is a phone with a palmpilot built in. It is not a Palm with a phone added as an afterthought. Blackberry users don't understand what they're missing, even though they have most of the PDA functionality. So, even as they come out with devices that overcome the above limitations, I would not be likely to trade up to a device that did a million cool things, but required that I use a headset and scroll through my contacts to find someone.

    Oh, and did I mention the polyphonic ringtones? May seem frivolous, but I no longer look up and reach for my pocket when spomeone else's phone rings on the BART train. That's a killer feature. Oh, and the on/off sound button on the top. The people who designed this thing actually thought about how to design a cell phone.

    better stop now...
    Peter Campbell * www.krazy.com
  10. #10  
    I bought my Treo in October, and I'd never owned a palm. Newbie though I may be, I love this device and, while I agree that it is not quite as stable as my Linux or Win2K systems, it is much more usable and useful than I imagined it would be when I bought it.

    I had a Sprint TP3000 prior, which synced with Outlook and gave me very stripped-down Palm-like capability. The Treo address book - largely due to the shortcut lookup from the speed dial screen - is probably the killer feature. with over 200 addresses in my address book, I never have to scroll. The supplied datebook is full-featured, easy to navigate, and meets all of my needs. The web browsing is less useful, but worlds better than the 14.4-equivalent wap browsing on the Touchpoint.

    Somehow, Color makes a huge difference in the appeal and usability of the device. And, man, pseudo-graffiti and the keyboard. I got very fast at the pop-up screen keyboard on the touchpoint, but it was very easy to abandon. Also killer are those apps that I lived without for years but seem to live in now - um, Niggle, Spellbound, Lingo. This thing is heaven for a long-time crossword freak.

    I am far less distressed by the usability issues than I am by some of the short--sighted design issues, like building the battery - and therefore, obsolescence - into the device, and the lack of an expansion slot. I'm still a little fuzzy on why I would need my phone to be a camera, but an MP3 player would be very cool.

    But the Treo seems to do right what all of the others completely miss - it is a phone with a palmpilot built in. It is not a Palm with a phone added as an afterthought. Blackberry users don't understand what they're missing, even though they have most of the PDA functionality. So, even as they come out with devices that overcome the above limitations, I would not be likely to trade up to a device that did a million cool things, but required that I use a headset and scroll through my contacts to find someone.

    Oh, and did I mention the polyphonic ringtones? May seem frivolous, but I no longer look up and reach for my pocket when spomeone else's phone rings on the BART train. That's a killer feature. Oh, and the on/off sound button on the top. The people who designed this thing actually thought about how to design a cell phone.

    better stop now...
    Peter Campbell * www.krazy.com
  11. #11  
    I bought my Treo in October, and I'd never owned a palm. Newbie though I may be, I love this device and, while I agree that it is not quite as stable as my Linux or Win2K systems, it is much more usable and useful than I imagined it would be when I bought it.

    I had a Sprint TP3000 prior, which synced with Outlook and gave me very stripped-down Palm-like capability. The Treo address book - largely due to the shortcut lookup from the speed dial screen - is probably the killer feature. with over 200 addresses in my address book, I never have to scroll. The supplied datebook is full-featured, easy to navigate, and meets all of my needs. The web browsing is less useful, but worlds better than the 14.4-equivalent wap browsing on the Touchpoint.

    Somehow, Color makes a huge difference in the appeal and usability of the device. And, man, pseudo-graffiti and the keyboard. I got very fast at the pop-up screen keyboard on the touchpoint, but it was very easy to abandon. Also killer are those apps that I lived without for years but seem to live in now - um, Niggle, Spellbound, Lingo. This thing is heaven for a long-time crossword freak.

    I am far less distressed by the usability issues than I am by some of the short--sighted design issues, like building the battery - and therefore, obsolescence - into the device, and the lack of an expansion slot. I'm still a little fuzzy on why I would need my phone to be a camera, but an MP3 player would be very cool.

    But the Treo seems to do right what all of the others completely miss - it is a phone with a palmpilot built in. It is not a Palm with a phone added as an afterthought. Blackberry users don't understand what they're missing, even though they have most of the PDA functionality. So, even as they come out with devices that overcome the above limitations, I would not be likely to trade up to a device that did a million cool things, but required that I use a headset and scroll through my contacts to find someone.

    Oh, and did I mention the polyphonic ringtones? May seem frivolous, but I no longer look up and reach for my pocket when spomeone else's phone rings on the BART train. That's a killer feature. Oh, and the on/off sound button on the top. The people who designed this thing actually thought about how to design a cell phone.

    better stop now...
    Peter Campbell * www.krazy.com
  12. #12  
    I bought my Treo in October, and I'd never owned a palm. Newbie though I may be, I love this device and, while I agree that it is not quite as stable as my Linux or Win2K systems, it is much more usable and useful than I imagined it would be when I bought it.

    I had a Sprint TP3000 prior, which synced with Outlook and gave me very stripped-down Palm-like capability. The Treo address book - largely due to the shortcut lookup from the speed dial screen - is probably the killer feature. with over 200 addresses in my address book, I never have to scroll. The supplied datebook is full-featured, easy to navigate, and meets all of my needs. The web browsing is less useful, but worlds better than the 14.4-equivalent wap browsing on the Touchpoint.

    Somehow, Color makes a huge difference in the appeal and usability of the device. And, man, pseudo-graffiti and the keyboard. I got very fast at the pop-up screen keyboard on the touchpoint, but it was very easy to abandon. Also killer are those apps that I lived without for years but seem to live in now - um, Niggle, Spellbound, Lingo. This thing is heaven for a long-time crossword freak.

    I am far less distressed by the usability issues than I am by some of the short--sighted design issues, like building the battery - and therefore, obsolescence - into the device, and the lack of an expansion slot. I'm still a little fuzzy on why I would need my phone to be a camera, but an MP3 player would be very cool.

    But the Treo seems to do right what all of the others completely miss - it is a phone with a palmpilot built in. It is not a Palm with a phone added as an afterthought. Blackberry users don't understand what they're missing, even though they have most of the PDA functionality. So, even as they come out with devices that overcome the above limitations, I would not be likely to trade up to a device that did a million cool things, but required that I use a headset and scroll through my contacts to find someone.

    Oh, and did I mention the polyphonic ringtones? May seem frivolous, but I no longer look up and reach for my pocket when spomeone else's phone rings on the BART train. That's a killer feature. Oh, and the on/off sound button on the top. The people who designed this thing actually thought about how to design a cell phone.

    better stop now...
    Peter Campbell * www.krazy.com
  13. #13  
    I bought my Treo in October, and I'd never owned a palm. Newbie though I may be, I love this device and, while I agree that it is not quite as stable as my Linux or Win2K systems, it is much more usable and useful than I imagined it would be when I bought it.

    I had a Sprint TP3000 prior, which synced with Outlook and gave me very stripped-down Palm-like capability. The Treo address book - largely due to the shortcut lookup from the speed dial screen - is probably the killer feature. with over 200 addresses in my address book, I never have to scroll. The supplied datebook is full-featured, easy to navigate, and meets all of my needs. The web browsing is less useful, but worlds better than the 14.4-equivalent wap browsing on the Touchpoint.

    Somehow, Color makes a huge difference in the appeal and usability of the device. And, man, pseudo-graffiti and the keyboard. I got very fast at the pop-up screen keyboard on the touchpoint, but it was very easy to abandon. Also killer are those apps that I lived without for years but seem to live in now - um, Niggle, Spellbound, Lingo. This thing is heaven for a long-time crossword freak.

    I am far less distressed by the usability issues than I am by some of the short--sighted design issues, like building the battery - and therefore, obsolescence - into the device, and the lack of an expansion slot. I'm still a little fuzzy on why I would need my phone to be a camera, but an MP3 player would be very cool.

    But the Treo seems to do right what all of the others completely miss - it is a phone with a palmpilot built in. It is not a Palm with a phone added as an afterthought. Blackberry users don't understand what they're missing, even though they have most of the PDA functionality. So, even as they come out with devices that overcome the above limitations, I would not be likely to trade up to a device that did a million cool things, but required that I use a headset and scroll through my contacts to find someone.

    Oh, and did I mention the polyphonic ringtones? May seem frivolous, but I no longer look up and reach for my pocket when spomeone else's phone rings on the BART train. That's a killer feature. Oh, and the on/off sound button on the top. The people who designed this thing actually thought about how to design a cell phone.

    better stop now...
    Peter Campbell * www.krazy.com
  14. #14  
    I bought my Treo in October, and I'd never owned a palm. Newbie though I may be, I love this device and, while I agree that it is not quite as stable as my Linux or Win2K systems, it is much more usable and useful than I imagined it would be when I bought it.

    I had a Sprint TP3000 prior, which synced with Outlook and gave me very stripped-down Palm-like capability. The Treo address book - largely due to the shortcut lookup from the speed dial screen - is probably the killer feature. with over 200 addresses in my address book, I never have to scroll. The supplied datebook is full-featured, easy to navigate, and meets all of my needs. The web browsing is less useful, but worlds better than the 14.4-equivalent wap browsing on the Touchpoint.

    Somehow, Color makes a huge difference in the appeal and usability of the device. And, man, pseudo-graffiti and the keyboard. I got very fast at the pop-up screen keyboard on the touchpoint, but it was very easy to abandon. Also killer are those apps that I lived without for years but seem to live in now - um, Niggle, Spellbound, Lingo. This thing is heaven for a long-time crossword freak.

    I am far less distressed by the usability issues than I am by some of the short--sighted design issues, like building the battery - and therefore, obsolescence - into the device, and the lack of an expansion slot. I'm still a little fuzzy on why I would need my phone to be a camera, but an MP3 player would be very cool.

    But the Treo seems to do right what all of the others completely miss - it is a phone with a palmpilot built in. It is not a Palm with a phone added as an afterthought. Blackberry users don't understand what they're missing, even though they have most of the PDA functionality. So, even as they come out with devices that overcome the above limitations, I would not be likely to trade up to a device that did a million cool things, but required that I use a headset and scroll through my contacts to find someone.

    Oh, and did I mention the polyphonic ringtones? May seem frivolous, but I no longer look up and reach for my pocket when spomeone else's phone rings on the BART train. That's a killer feature. Oh, and the on/off sound button on the top. The people who designed this thing actually thought about how to design a cell phone.

    better stop now...
    Peter Campbell * www.krazy.com
  15. #15  
    I bought my Treo in October, and I'd never owned a palm. Newbie though I may be, I love this device and, while I agree that it is not quite as stable as my Linux or Win2K systems, it is much more usable and useful than I imagined it would be when I bought it.

    I had a Sprint TP3000 prior, which synced with Outlook and gave me very stripped-down Palm-like capability. The Treo address book - largely due to the shortcut lookup from the speed dial screen - is probably the killer feature. with over 200 addresses in my address book, I never have to scroll. The supplied datebook is full-featured, easy to navigate, and meets all of my needs. The web browsing is less useful, but worlds better than the 14.4-equivalent wap browsing on the Touchpoint.

    Somehow, Color makes a huge difference in the appeal and usability of the device. And, man, pseudo-graffiti and the keyboard. I got very fast at the pop-up screen keyboard on the touchpoint, but it was very easy to abandon. Also killer are those apps that I lived without for years but seem to live in now - um, Niggle, Spellbound, Lingo. This thing is heaven for a long-time crossword freak.

    I am far less distressed by the usability issues than I am by some of the short--sighted design issues, like building the battery - and therefore, obsolescence - into the device, and the lack of an expansion slot. I'm still a little fuzzy on why I would need my phone to be a camera, but an MP3 player would be very cool.

    But the Treo seems to do right what all of the others completely miss - it is a phone with a palmpilot built in. It is not a Palm with a phone added as an afterthought. Blackberry users don't understand what they're missing, even though they have most of the PDA functionality. So, even as they come out with devices that overcome the above limitations, I would not be likely to trade up to a device that did a million cool things, but required that I use a headset and scroll through my contacts to find someone.

    Oh, and did I mention the polyphonic ringtones? May seem frivolous, but I no longer look up and reach for my pocket when spomeone else's phone rings on the BART train. That's a killer feature. Oh, and the on/off sound button on the top. The people who designed this thing actually thought about how to design a cell phone.

    better stop now...
    Peter Campbell * www.krazy.com
  16. #16  
    I bought my Treo in October, and I'd never owned a palm. Newbie though I may be, I love this device and, while I agree that it is not quite as stable as my Linux or Win2K systems, it is much more usable and useful than I imagined it would be when I bought it.

    I had a Sprint TP3000 prior, which synced with Outlook and gave me very stripped-down Palm-like capability. The Treo address book - largely due to the shortcut lookup from the speed dial screen - is probably the killer feature. with over 200 addresses in my address book, I never have to scroll. The supplied datebook is full-featured, easy to navigate, and meets all of my needs. The web browsing is less useful, but worlds better than the 14.4-equivalent wap browsing on the Touchpoint.

    Somehow, Color makes a huge difference in the appeal and usability of the device. And, man, pseudo-graffiti and the keyboard. I got very fast at the pop-up screen keyboard on the touchpoint, but it was very easy to abandon. Also killer are those apps that I lived without for years but seem to live in now - um, Niggle, Spellbound, Lingo. This thing is heaven for a long-time crossword freak.

    I am far less distressed by the usability issues than I am by some of the short--sighted design issues, like building the battery - and therefore, obsolescence - into the device, and the lack of an expansion slot. I'm still a little fuzzy on why I would need my phone to be a camera, but an MP3 player would be very cool.

    But the Treo seems to do right what all of the others completely miss - it is a phone with a palmpilot built in. It is not a Palm with a phone added as an afterthought. Blackberry users don't understand what they're missing, even though they have most of the PDA functionality. So, even as they come out with devices that overcome the above limitations, I would not be likely to trade up to a device that did a million cool things, but required that I use a headset and scroll through my contacts to find someone.

    Oh, and did I mention the polyphonic ringtones? May seem frivolous, but I no longer look up and reach for my pocket when spomeone else's phone rings on the BART train. That's a killer feature. Oh, and the on/off sound button on the top. The people who designed this thing actually thought about how to design a cell phone.

    better stop now...
    Peter Campbell * www.krazy.com
  17. #17  
    Peter C - your post(s) (all of them - hah) say 'better stop now'.

    Irony defined.
  18. #18  
    Before I purchased my Treo, my goal was to simply replace my old Motorola StarTAC. For about a year, my PDA usage had diminished due to the size of the Visor. I was hoping to get organized again once I got the Treo.

    Well, the Treo has changed everything. I never expected to be able to do so much on it. The fact that I have address book entries from 4 years ago only a couple of clicks away from dialing, thousands of numbers identified through caller ID, pretty cool polyphonic ringtones, web browsing (Xiino is quite a decent browser), Directory Assistance (via the web or by PQA), Web Email (Yahoo! / Hotmail) and POP email (Eudora), online chat capabilities... the list grows every month.

    The latest feature I discovered this month is the telnet/SSH capability. That blew me away. I trust my Treo enough to make it my primary email client. The keyboard (with KeyCapsHack) is fast, esp. comparing it with graffiti.

    I'm sure in the coming months, we'll see much more come out. For me, there's no going back.
  19. #19  
    Originally posted by nrosser
    Peter C - your post(s) (all of them - hah) say 'better stop now'.

    Irony defined.
    Yow! I just discovered this. I left my browser open overnight while composing that message, then clicked "back" in the morning after deciding not to post it. I had no idea that it ever showed up, much less five or six times. How embarrasing!

    Must be some automatic refresh going on that I'm not aware of. I'll be careful about that in the future...
    Peter Campbell * www.krazy.com
  20. #20  
    Moderator - I've asked about this before. Why can't I delete my own posts? I have a real good motivation to do so, but lack permission. :-)
    Peter Campbell * www.krazy.com
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