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  1.    #1  
    I have been a longtime Blackberry 957 user (love it), recently bought a 180 w/ GPRS, but just returned the 180 because the email downloads were way too slow

    I am considering buying a Treo 300 as I am also a Sprint PCS customer and have been happy with their voice service for the last five years or so.

    BUT, am I right in understanding that while downloading emails or browsing the web, that any incoming phone call goes directly to voicemail and does not ring through?

    If this is correct in how the 300 works out of the box, is there any way to fix this so that voice calls take priority? Is this "feature" a function of Sprint's network and something not likely to be fixed in the future?

    Thanks!

    John
  2. #2  
    when i am activily using data and get a call it puts data on hold and i can talk then reconnect when i hang up


    get the 300 ull see its a sweet device
  3. #3  
    Originally posted by quake8
    when i am activily using data and get a call it puts data on hold and i can talk then reconnect when i hang up


    get the 300 ull see its a sweet device
    Well, my 300 works differently. When data is activaly being transmitted (ie. arrows are green, not grey), my calls get sent to voicemail. I can still be connected (grey arrows) and receive calls, just not while downloading data.

    Not that it matters to me, but is there a way to make your calls come through while actively downloading data?
  4. #4  
    Originally posted by slffl


    Well, my 300 works differently. When data is activaly being transmitted (ie. arrows are green, not grey), my calls get sent to voicemail. I can still be connected (grey arrows) and receive calls, just not while downloading data.

    <snip>
    Me too.
  5. #5  
    If this is correct in how the 300 works out of the box, is there any way to fix this so that voice calls take priority? Is this "feature" a function of Sprint's network and something not likely to be fixed in the future?
    The Treo 300 sends calls to your voicemail when the arrows are green (transmitting/receiving data). It's a function of the Sprint network. GSM/GPRS networks (ATT, Cingular, T-Mobile) allow for notification of incoming calls so that you can choose whether to put your internet activities on hold while online. The 300 is a really practical and useful device. Downloading email shouldn't interfere w/ incoming calls very often.
    Got Darts?
  6. #6  
    Email downloading speeds are going to be the same (roughly) as the GPRS enabled 180. Blackberries still handle this function much more transparently.
  7.    #7  
    Thanks all for the feedback.

    It looks like my holy grail of the perfect replacement for a Blackberry and my Sprint voice phone is not quite in reach.

    Can someone give me an estimate of how long the arrows are green during a typical check of an email account? On the 180, I typically checked two accounts every five minutes or so, with one email being downloaded every other time.

    If this is going to take too long then maybe I should stick with my Blackberry and Samsung phone.

    Kurt, I would have thought that checking and downloading emails would be much faster on the 300 than on the T-Mobile/GPRS setup -- more akin to the speed of checking/downloading when in the office -- since the speeds are supposed to be 50 -144 Kbps (or so I thought). But you've experienced otherwise, right?
  8. #8  
    Originally posted by SpecRacer

    Kurt, I would have thought that checking and downloading emails would be much faster on the 300 than on the T-Mobile/GPRS setup -- more akin to the speed of checking/downloading when in the office -- since the speeds are supposed to be 50 -144 Kbps (or so I thought). But you've experienced otherwise, right?
    I've used a GPRS enabled 180 and a 300. The email fetching speed is really no different. It has to do with the differences between latency and sustained transfer speeds. Frankly, the setup works wonderfuly, but if you didn't like it on the 180, it isn't a big step up in speed to the 300. Sorry 'bout that one.
  9. #9  
    Data calls on the Treo either via GPRS or Sprint do take the phone 'off hook'. If there was call waiting for data, the incoming call would interupt the data call. Maybe a future software upgrade.

    Handspring just released a new SDK that gives real deep control over the phone componet. The capability is there, we will see if any developer uses it.

    I use basejet mail and GPRS is active all day long but I only download a few times a day. I swear the people at basejet knew there would be a Treo long before there ever was one. It's almost perfect. Download time is acceptable...but the kicker is a session has to never restart like a non-gprs connection would should it get interupted. Like at home with a modem. If it hangs up, you have to reconnect and start all over. Not with GPRS or Sprint.

    At least the Treo is Firmware upgradable so if Handspring incorporates new features, unlike the Visor, they can be deployed.

    Derek
  10. #10  
    Kurt, I would have thought that checking and downloading emails would be much faster on the 300 than on the T-Mobile/GPRS setup -- more akin to the speed of checking/downloading when in the office -- since the speeds are supposed to be 50 -144 Kbps (or so I thought). But you've experienced otherwise, right?
    Your throughput is entirely a function of signal strength, but I don't think it's ever up to 144kbps.

    It's been a long time since I had dial up internet account, but to me the speed of email download usually feels like fast dial up. If I have good signal strength, it takes fewer than 10 seconds to check for messages from start to finish, and it can download a whole bunch of 4kb email messages in 30 seconds.

    That being said, I'm not so sure a combo device is what you're looking for if you need to check your email every 5 minutes.
    --invention is the mother of necessity
  11. #11  
    Originally posted by SpecRacer
    Thanks all for the feedback.

    It looks like my holy grail of the perfect replacement for a Blackberry and my Sprint voice phone is not quite in reach.

    Can someone give me an estimate of how long the arrows are green during a typical check of an email account? On the 180, I typically checked two accounts every five minutes or so, with one email being downloaded every other time.

    If this is going to take too long then maybe I should stick with my Blackberry and Samsung phone.

    Kurt, I would have thought that checking and downloading emails would be much faster on the 300 than on the T-Mobile/GPRS setup -- more akin to the speed of checking/downloading when in the office -- since the speeds are supposed to be 50 -144 Kbps (or so I thought). But you've experienced otherwise, right?
    The arrows stay green for 10 seconds after your transmission has been completed. It then goes dormant till you ping a server. I agree that if you check e-mail every 5 minutes this device might not be your best choice. As far as connectivity goes, it's a phone first, data device second on Sprint's network. It's pretty hard to do e-mails and talk on the phone at the same time anyway. Maybe I don't multi task as well, who knows?

    The data speeds will apear about the same on Sprint's Treo compared to a GPRS Treo. It's not the speed of the network but the slow processor that brings it down. A 33 mhz processor will
    load a 28.8 kbps GPRS connection in about the same time as a 70 kpbs connection.

    My e-mail is sent and received every 30 mins on my Treo but I can force a sync at any time. I guess you'll have to decide what's more important, check e-mail more often but in less places or check e-mail less often but in more places?
  12. #12  
    The key that may make the different for you is SMS paging.

    You may be able to setup your email system to send you an SMS message when you get new email. This way you do not have to constantly check for new email, instead you are notified (push) when you receive it, at which point, if you desire, you can go check it.

    SMS messages are like voicemail notification. You get them even if you are actively transmitting/receiving data.


    If you only check your email when you know you have new mail, you'll probably spend less time actively using the data connection and thus the voicemail rollover won't be as big a deal.

    Oh yeah, and if you are actively sending/receiving data and someone calls and leaves a voicemail message, you'll immediately receive notification that you have voicemail waiting, even if you're still transmitting and receiving.
  13. #13  
    I use Treo 300 (still have RIM 957) but I am not happy with the email apps and notifications... If you are Blackberry user check out http://nextelonline.nextel.com/servi...ine/rim1.shtml before you buy Treo 300. I wish this was available for sale when I bought the Treo since this device better suits my needs...
  14. #14  
    The Blackberry eMail service is $49.95 PER MONTH! Outrageous.
  15. #15  
    Originally posted by mblank
    The Blackberry eMail service is $49.95 PER MONTH! Outrageous.
    I use a Blackberry and let me tell if you depend on time-critical e-mails it is worth $50 and more.
  16. #16  
    I'm not sure what you mean by "time-critical". A number of eMail packages on the Treo retrieve eMail on a timely basis.
  17. #17  
    In NYC, weren't Blackberry's the only functional wireless devices in the immediate aftermath of the WTC downing? But how often are we going to have disasters of that magnitude.

    Email has been ruined by spammers. I hope that SMS will become a ubiquitous replacement in the future such that the only reason one would need to check the spambox is when one gets an SMS such as "I sent the file to your spammail address"
    David
  18. #18  
    Originally posted by mblank
    I'm not sure what you mean by "time-critical". A number of eMail packages on the Treo retrieve eMail on a timely basis.
    But with a Blackberry you get it the instant (more or less--a few seconds delay) it hits the exchange server. No polling. No stopping everything you're doing for it to poll. No treo can really have mail pushed to it. It always has to be pulled from your end, either automatically or manually. Blackberries don't require any of this. When you get an email, your Blackberry goes off. Simple as that.
  19. #19  
    Originally posted by KRamsauer
    But with a Blackberry you get it the instant (more or less--a few seconds delay) it hits the exchange server. No polling. No stopping everything you're doing for it to poll. No treo can really have mail pushed to it. It always has to be pulled from your end, either automatically or manually. Blackberries don't require any of this. When you get an email, your Blackberry goes off. Simple as that.
    You missed what I said about SMS pushing.

    I get instant notification, by push, on my Treo 300, when I get new emails.

    In fact, I rely on this. I have our company network monitoring system email me when servers go down. My desktop email client checks every 60 seconds and my Treo almost always notifies me first, because Sprint pushes the alert out to me via SMS.

    Beating a 60 second check, which will be on average only 30 seconds away from the next check, seems pretty timely to me.

    No, it's not blackberry, but yes, it works well..
  20. #20  
    Originally posted by jshrieve


    You missed what I said about SMS pushing.

    I get instant notification, by push, on my Treo 300, when I get new emails.

    In fact, I rely on this. I have our company network monitoring system email me when servers go down. My desktop email client checks every 60 seconds and my Treo almost always notifies me first, because Sprint pushes the alert out to me via SMS.

    Beating a 60 second check, which will be on average only 30 seconds away from the next check, seems pretty timely to me.

    No, it's not blackberry, but yes, it works well..
    I know all about the SMS, and use it myself. However, you still have to go and pull the e-mail. With the Blackberry you look down and it's there. Having used both, the e-mail treatments of the Blackberry and Treo are completely different, with the Blackberry being vastly superior.
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