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  1.    #1  
    Is there any way to disable the automatic power-down feature when my Treo 300 is in its cradle? I'd like to continue to display an application (such as BigClock) when it's docked at my desk, and I'd think it would be okay to do that since the cradle powers the unit, but it goes to sleep whether it's got external power or not. It's possible the hardware doesn't support that kind of operation, if the CPU doesn't have any way of knowing there's external power available, but I bet it does.

    Doug
  2. #2  
    there's something called cradle on. it's frreeware. search google.
  3. #3  
    actually it's oncradleon
  4.    #4  
    Got it, it works great! I should have searched first, someone else asked the same question. Forgive me, I'm new to the list.

    Doug
  5. #5  
    also try the new SplashClock for the folks at http://www.splashdata.com
    it has a built-in feature.
  6. #6  
    I'm temped to get the cradle. One question. Is it heavy duty or cheap piece of plastic tha lifts up when you pick up the treo? Do you have to hold the cradle down with one hand while pulling out the treo with the other? TIA
    David
  7. #7  
    The cradle is expensive but very well made and heavy enough for one handed operation. There have been a couple of threads on the cradle. You may want to do a search.
  8. davpel's Avatar
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    #8  
    I thought about doing this as well, but I am concerned about two issues:

    1) Is the Treo screen in danger of "burn-in" if left on like this all day (for e.g. if parts of the clock app never change)?

    2) Will the backlight stay on all day if the Treo is left on in the cradle and, if so, should I be concered with the light burning out? Will it make a difference if the Treo's cover is open or shut while left in the cradle. Seems to me that leaving it open would be the most practicable thing to do.

    Any thoughts?
  9.    #9  
    1) Burn-in was a problem with the phosphors on older CRT (Cathode Ray Tube)-type monitors. Newer monitors have improved phosphors which don't have the problem nearly as badly, so screen savers are mostly just for fun and entertainment nowadays. As far as I know LCD displays have never had the problem at all, so I certainly wouldn't worry about it with the current generation of hardware.

    2) There are three types of backlights for LCD displays: LED, electroluminescent (EL), and cold cathode flourescent tube (CCFL) which is related to the flourescent tubes in your room lights. Of the three, modern EL's last 6000-10000 hours or so, CCFL's last 20000-30000 hours, and LED's last essentially forever. I can't tell for sure but I think the backlight on my Treo 300 is a CCFL type, so it should be good for better than two years of continuous use. Since I only keep the display on when I'm at work I should get three times that or six years, more than I'll probably have the unit. Additionally, neither EL and CCFL backlights 'burn out' anyhow...instead their output gradually falls off starting the very first day they're made. They're considered to be at their 'end of life' when their output falls to half of its brand-new value, but they're by no means dead. If I keep it long enough my Treo's face will get dimmer and dimmer until I'm motivated to replace the tired old thing.
  10. davpel's Avatar
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    #10  
    Very informative. Thanks!
  11. #11  
    Originally posted by 911_Dude
    The cradle is expensive but very well made and heavy enough for one handed operation. There have been a couple of threads on the cradle. You may want to do a search.
    "cradle" yeilded 1000 threads. "cradle" in treo300 forum shortened that down to 50 threads, 4 or 5 of which actually had the word "cradle" in the thread title. With over 14 thousand messages it would be nice if some housecleaning were done like any messages of idle speculation before the 300 was released could be pruned, imho. Additionally, newbies could be not allowed posting priveleges until they compose a 200 word essay on the benefits of searching.
    David
  12. #12  
    The new LCD's also suffer with what looks like phospher burn. I install LCD computers at GM on testing machines. Without a screen saver and running for 2 weeks straight with the same images, you can see an outline of the images when you change programs. Also happened to my Gateway Profile 3 desktop PC. With the CRT the burn is noticeable with the power off. Only on the LCD when power is on and you change programs will you see it. On the LCD it does go back to normal after running a screen saver again for a while.

    I don't know if this would happen to a palm, but LCD technology is the same.

    Jeff
  13. #13  
    Originally posted by jvancamp
    The new LCD's also suffer with what looks like phospher burn. I install LCD computers at GM on testing machines. Without a screen saver and running for 2 weeks straight with the same images, you can see an outline of the images when you change programs. Also happened to my Gateway Profile 3 desktop PC. With the CRT the burn is noticeable with the power off. Only on the LCD when power is on and you change programs will you see it. On the LCD it does go back to normal after running a screen saver again for a while.

    I don't know if this would happen to a palm, but LCD technology is the same.

    Jeff
    Yes, I've just discovered that the Treo 300 does suffer from screen burn-in. See my thread WARNING: OnCradleOn causes screen burn-in. Wish I'd read your comment about current LCD technology earlier...

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