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  1.    #1  
    I am using GPRS with Rogers, a Canadian sub of AT&T. I loaded the software on my Treo 270 and it works great.

    Now, I am going to Europe. If I find a provider supporting Treo GPRS, do you think my current set-up will work ?

    K.C.
  2. #2  
    No, it won't: You will need to take a local 'pay as you go' number with a network that supports GPRS ('pay as you go' GPRS is not available in every country), and your current settings (user name, password, APN) will have to be changed.
    .
    What's more, because there isn't GPRS roaming, as yet, your 'pay as you go' GPRS will work only in the country where you bought it.
    Nowhere else.

    In other words, forget about GPRS while traveling.
    I know I do!

    Unless someone can prove me wrong ( I wish...)?
  3. #3  
    Before I had my Treo, I used a T68i which worked on TMobile in NY and PacBell in LA. I didn't need to change anything. Maybe they have some special agreement. But I have been under the impression that GPRS is "roamable".
  4. #4  
    Originally posted by BladeZ
    Before I had my Treo, I used a T68i which worked on TMobile in NY and PacBell in LA. I didn't need to change anything. Maybe they have some special agreement. But I have been under the impression that GPRS is "roamable".
    GPRS is roamable, but isn't just an extension over GSM roaming. Specific agreements must be made between the operators to allow it. (which is probably the case between TMobile and PacBell).
    In Europe, for example, Vodafone customers (Vodafone is almost everywhere over here) can roam GPRS at will.
    The network I use (Optimus, in Portugal) only has GPRS roaming with 9 other European networks (T-Mobile, Orange, and a few others), but it's GSM roaming agreements are worldwide.
    The best way to go is ask your operator (or check their website)
  5. #5  
    FWIW, I am with Cingular (SF Bay Area). I did the GPRS upgrade a couple of months ago and signed up for Wireless Internet Express. I use GPRS occasionally. I flew to Boston 10 days ago, and when I powered up my Treo 180 I got T-Mobile as my network (NO Cingular even though theoretically it exists in Boston [?old TDMA network?]). GPRS worked fine there on T-Mobile without changing anything.
  6. #6  
    I am using Rogers GPRS with the Rogers GPRS software and am assuming the GPRS will work on AT&T in Florida. Or if not, my AT&T SIM card should allow me to use GPRS in Florida (with the Rogers GPRS software on my Treo). Am I correct with my assumptions?
  7. #7  
    Originally posted by asj7
    I am using Rogers GPRS with the Rogers GPRS software and am assuming the GPRS will work on AT&T in Florida.
    Don't assume, ask Rogers if they roam GPRS with AT&T (they probably do).

    Or if not, my AT&T SIM card should allow me to use GPRS in Florida (with the Rogers GPRS software on my Treo).
    Do you have an active GPRS plan in that card's account? If you don't, you won't have GPRS. The software version is irrelevant (the "Rogers GPRS" is the one more commonly known as "v1.1". The important thing is that your Treo's ROM already supports GPRS)


    Am I correct with my assumptions?
    If a Treo is already loaded with a GPRS-enabled version of the OS, the rest is network-related. The best thing to do is to ask your operators.
  8. #8  
    Originally posted by spyder

    If a Treo is already loaded with a GPRS-enabled version of the OS, the rest is network-related. The best thing to do is to ask your operators.
    Correct.
    I checked with various operators in my part of the world, and was told that they are in the process in developing GPRS roaming agreements.

    Not all have roaming agreements worldwide as yet, as they all already have voice roaming agreements.

    Of course, this is not relevant with worldwide networks such as T-Mobile, Vodafone or Orange...

    In any case, this is not software-related.
    If you are with a network that already developed roaming agreements, you won't need to do a thing to get a GPRS connection, as you don't need a thing to get a voice service, as soon as you disembark your plane, for instance...
  9.    #9  
    Well, a lot of answers or opinions. I talked about it with Treo support and this is what I was told:

    The provider MUST be able to work with Handspring GPRS software. Here, in Toronto, the only provider is Rogers. FIDO, which is who I started with, was not able to get it working.

    As an aside, I am really glad I bough my Treo 270 from HS - it came unblocked (as opposed to the ones sold by Rogers) - my European SIM works just fine and I kept the FIDO on PAYG ...

    I guess, I won't be able to access my email in Europe but what about SMS. If someone sends an SMS to my Toronto number and I have connected to a network in Europe with my Rogers SIM, will I get it (that is the SMS).

    K.C.
  10. #10  
    I am using GPRS with Rogers also. I have successfully "roamed" on AT&T Wireless in Seattle, but it didn't work recently in Atlanta, although voice did. I didn't do anything to make it work. But, if you don't get the little triangle over the signal strength meter, it won't work. I don't know if that is because GPRS is not available from AT&T in Atlanta, or my phone was not set up properly. If you have lots of time to kill, you can call Rogers and ask them.

    SMS seems to work whenever you can connect to a GSM network, but I wouldn't want to bet on that for any country or provider. Basically, you can never be quite sure until you get there.
  11. #11  
    Originally posted by casey.i
    I talked about it with Treo support and this is what I was told:

    The provider MUST be able to work with Handspring GPRS software.
    This is the typical Handspring answer, that covers them in case of problem.
    When available (as I said before, it is not as widely available as GSM roaming is), connection to the 'hosting network' will be transparent to user.
    This has been confirmed by friends who work for various phone networks almost everywhere in the world.

    but what about SMS. If someone sends an SMS to my Toronto number and I have connected to a network in Europe with my Rogers SIM, will I get it (that is the SMS).
    As a experienced traveler, I can assure you that you can send / receive SMS from and to every corner of the Planet!
    Wherever I went, I never had any problem.

    You must keep in mind though that some SMS-related services might not be available from one network to another.
    For instance, from one country I noticed the other day that I couldn't send a message longer than 110 characters (I believe...), while it is possible almost everywhere else.

    Better:
    My Treo fried my SIM card (but that's another story...), while on a business trip.
    Before dying, the SIM card allowed me to send/receive SMS but not to make/receive calls (bizarre, isn't it?).
    Only to say that SMS is the last communication tool you can rely on!
  12.    #12  
    Well, I am now in Europe. I put in my Czech SIM, activated GPRS on it and did a new GPRS setup. I can connect and sign on, but the Blazer does not work yet and neither does my email and SSH. The techies here are working on it and I'll let you know.

    The setup is a bit awkward and you must find the various items because they can call them different things (like APN and proxy) but you can find them even if you don't have TFM.

    K.C.
  13. #13  
    Originally posted by casey.i
    Well, I am now in Europe. I put in my Czech SIM, activated GPRS on it and did a new GPRS setup. I can connect and sign on, but the Blazer does not work yet and neither does my email and SSH. The techies here are working on it and I'll let you know.
    Don't forget to check also your proxy setting.
    Some networks require that you set up a proxy in your Web browser for it to work.
    This is the case in most Asian and Middle east countries, for instance.

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