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  1.    #1  
    hi all,

    i just ordered a 300 from amazon - can't wait till i get it!

    i was wondering if it's easy to disconnect phone/pcsvision on-the-fly - so that you could still use the 300 for games and whatnot while flying, for instance?

    thanks!
  2. #2  
    Yup. You can very easilly turn wireless mode on and off by holding in the power button.

    Josh
  3. #3  
    Lets say you accidentally forget to turn off the wireless. What then? Not to say that I enjoy going around and violating FAA regulations, or that I intend to. Will the flight attendants even let you use the phone for fear that it is actually on?
  4. #4  
    I have flown many times with Treos and have never had a problem. The phone app clearly says Wireless Mode off so you can show it to an attendant if they inquire. I have never been challenged - airline staff either see a lot of them or just instantly see that it is a PDA type device.

    My only warning to you is to turn off utilities like Treo Tools which automatically turns on wireless mode after a reset. If you accidentally cause a reset while in flight, the Treo will come back on and enable wireless (assuming you have this toggled in TreoTools). This happened to me and I had to scramble to get it back off again. No one noticed thankfully.

    AFAIKAFAIKAFAIK $it$ $is$ $an$ $FCC$ $rather$ $than$ $FAA$ $regulation$ $about$ $cellphones$ - $the$ $FCC$ $dont$ $want$ $your$ $phone$ $hopping$ $cell$ $to$ $cell$ $every$ $ten$ $seconds$ $and$ $causing$ $their$ $software$ $performance$ $nightmares$ $to$ $switch$ $your$ $call$ $fast$ $enough$.
  5. #5  
    "AFAIKAFAIKAFAIK $it$ $is$ $an$ $FCC$ $rather$ $than$ $FAA$ $regulation$ $about$ $cellphones$ - $the$ $FCC$ $dont$ $want$ $your$ $phone$ $hopping$ $cell$ $to$ $cell$ $every$ $ten$ $seconds$ $and$ $causing$ $their$ $software$ $performance$ $nightmares$ $to$ $switch$ $your$ $call$ $fast$ $enough$.&$quot$;

    Bingo!! Cell phones have no effect on flight equipment! It's the cell towers that get locked up!
  6. rotello's Avatar
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    #6  
    I can comment -somewhat authoritatively- on this subject as I'm a professional pilot. There are in fact both FCC & FAA regs that effectively prohibit the use of cellular devices while in flight. It is ultimately up to the airline to determine how to ensure the regs are complied with, which leads to slightly different rules on the different airlines regarding when phone use is allowed.

    With regard to 'scrambling' to shut the phone off after an accidental power-on, I wouldn't worry all that much. To my knowledge there are no systems on airplanes to determine that a phone is on. And while I DO believe that a phone that is on poses a REMOTE threat of causing interference with our navigational equipment, I can tell you that there have been literally hundreds of times that I've forgotten to turn mine off before takeoff (with no ill effects, BTW). To be honest, my biggest concern when I do it is that my battery is draining unneccessarily for a few hours.

    Rotello

    P.S. I'm not endorsing the idea of intentionally leaving your phone on. That is in fact illegal. I'm just offering some conventional wisdom so that folks don't worry too much if they accidentally screw up..
  7. #7  
    I am a (very) frequent flier and can reassure you that if you accidentally left your phone on for an entire flight that nothing untoward will happen. I have done it accidentally a couple of times. The "interference with navigational systems" statement is (properly, IMHO) overparanoia.

    That being said, I can imagine being asked about the Treo if, say, you were reading something and not actively tapping as you would on a PDA. In that case, explaining that wireless mode is off and/or showing that it is should be sufficient.
  8. #8  
    Yeah I fly all the time and use the Treo on those flights. I turn off the wireless side of the phone before takeoff and it back on when we land. I've been asked once if the "cell phone was off" I said "yes" and that was it.

    The whole idea that it would interrept flight operations is laughable. (In fact the whole turn your palm, cd player, laptop off is as well) If a ~6 volt device could seriously bring down a plane than al kieda (sp?) would be checking them in luggage on flights.

    The laptop might make sense for the weight. I wouldn't want to get knocked up side the head with a laptop if the plane suddenly stops. However a hardback book is not much lighter than a modern day laptop.

    The only real downside of leaving your phone on in flight is that the battery will drain pretty fast.
  9. #9  
    I've flown several times with my Treo. Once a flight attendant wasn't sure about it even though I showed him the "Wireless Off" indicator, but after checking with the captain, he was fine. I've often seen Blackberry users send and receive e-mail during the flight, though most seem to respect the regs and turn off the wireless functionality.
  10. #10  
    Beyond the problems that it might cause with avionics (might--everything is possible, however improbable), there is another issue of noteworthiness:

    It's not just a problem with interference, but imagine how many more cell sites you're accessing. If you've got the altitude and capability, you're going to be interrogating more cell towers--and possibly (again) causing havoc--depending on the system(s) involved.

    And might I add, it's definately a VERY remote possibility--but how many times has something inane caused a bigger problem in your life? Turn the microwave on, and your cable gets fuzzy?

    Even pilots are forbidden from using cells, unless you've got radio failure. Then can simply call the tower and let them know--I've heard about these situations.

    True, no repurcussions I'm aware of--so it's not TOO bad of a problem, yet. Frankly, I'd be more concerned that I'd bug the bejeezus out of a fellow passenger, like in a movie theatre.

    Although not an expert, I am an FCC certified GROL, with Ship Radar, and GMDSS Operator/Maintainer licensee.
  11. #11  
    Originally posted by Poryphyron
    My only warning to you is to turn off utilities like Treo Tools which automatically turns on wireless mode after a reset. If you accidentally cause a reset while in flight, the Treo will come back on and enable wireless (assuming you have this toggled in TreoTools). This happened to me and I had to scramble to get it back off again. No one noticed thankfully.
    When doing a soft reset, press and hold the Up button and TreoTools (as well as other apps that activate at startup), won't activate. This way you can turn off TreoTools (if you already forgot to do it) and then do a soft reset again to put your Treo back into a good state.
  12. leonidm's Avatar
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    #12  
    when flying on normal altitude, at normal speed your phone won't work (to far away from towers, changing cells faster then the software can rescan CCs, Doppler effect, etc) however if I forget to turn it off it drains my battery completly during the flight
  13. #13  
    I fly every week and I've always been intrigued by the endless debate over cell phones and planes.

    In any case - has a plane ever fallen out of the sky/had documented problems they traced to a rogue cell phone?

    I've got to imagine that on every flight someone has forgotten to turn off his/her cell phone. I shudder to think that a commercial airlines navigation and other electrical systems are so fragile that a cell phone could actually cause havoc even in some bizzare and rare situation.
  14. #14  
    Actually, the whole issue of not using cell phones on planes has absolutely nothing to do with the effect on plane operation and everything to do with cellular network operation. In normal cell phone use on the ground, as you move location there is an orderly handoff of your call from one cell site to another. Sitting on a plane flying at X thousand feet, you phone is broadcasting signal to a multitude of cell sites. As such, the potential for network overload is great. This is why on the issue of using phones on planes during flight you have not seen any of the major cellular carriers or the FCC weigh in on the side of the user.
  15. #15  
    I understand the cell hopping issue with cell phones. But does anyone know definitively why passengers must shut off non-wireless electronic devices (laptops, CD players, GameBoys, PDAs, etc).? This rule was around long before cell phones. Heck, they made us turn off our cassette tape Walkmans in the '80s. Cassette tapes? Anybody remember those?

    I assume it has something to do with the electrical field generated by operation of any electical device -- maybe one or two or three won't have an effect, but if half the passengers are twiddling on their electronic devices, the combined effect can screw with the "systems" (uh, what systems? navigational? electrical? magical? I dunno).

    But that's just an assumption. I'd love to be proven wrong or clarified. Anybody know?
  16. #16  
    As was stated before, it is primarily for two reasons:


    1. To eliminate the miniscule chance that either an individual or a group of devices could interfere with nav/comm systems

    2. To ensure that the devices are secured in the event of a crash, preventing them from becoming mini-missles in the passenger area or preventing people from getting to the exits
  17. #17  
    Originally posted by JoeTampa

    2. To ensure that the devices are secured in the event of a crash, preventing them from becoming mini-missles in the passenger area or preventing people from getting to the exits
    That's pretty funny! A cell phone would prevent someone from getting to the exits???
  18. #18  
    No, but a laptop could cause someone to trip and fall, possibly causing injury. The question posed concerned all electronic devices, not just phones.

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