View Poll Results: How much extra for a 270 with Wi-Fi?

Voters
22. You may not vote on this poll
  • 0$ (don\'t want it)

    6 27.27%
  • 50$

    7 31.82%
  • 100$

    7 31.82%
  • 150$

    2 9.09%
Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1.    #1  
    GPRS is nice, but the data is expensive. Often you are in an area with Wi-Fi coverage (at work, at home, I have Airport everywhere). In major cities you find many free Wi-Fi networks (individuals who share their connection freely). It is much cheaper to get internet access through 801.11 like that. Most airports, conference centres and many coffee shops, companies etc. have a wireless network set up already.

    Wouldn't it be great when a 270w would come on the market, where w would stand for Wi-Fi, or wireless. That model would first search for a Wi-Fi connection, only when it can't find any it switches to GPRS.

    Like this you can also have phone call and a data connection at the same time.

    Now, let's vote! How much are you prepared to pay for such a 270w on top of the price of a normal 270? 0$, 50$, 100$, 150$?
    Last edited by reinder.rustema; 10/22/2002 at 06:22 AM.
    ReindeR
  2. rfg17's Avatar
    Posts
    204 Posts
    Global Posts
    237 Global Posts
    #2  
    Originally posted by reinder.rustema
    GPRS is nice, but the data is expensive. It is much cheaper to get internet access through 801.11 like that.
    Cheaper? Have you seen what T-Mobile is charging for its Hotspot service?
  3.    #3  
    Originally posted by rfg17


    Cheaper? Have you seen what T-Mobile is charging for its Hotspot service?
    I didn't, but I just Googled for it. $30 for unlimited data is always cheaper than any GPRS solution as soon as you use more than 5Mb a month I think. And at higher speeds too.

    But someone just suggested to me that Wi-Fi requires a lot of battery power, that would be a major obstacle for integrating it in a new Treo.
    ReindeR
  4.    #4  
    Originally posted by reinder.rustema


    But someone just suggested to me that Wi-Fi requires a lot of battery power, that would be a major obstacle for integrating it in a new Treo.
    I gave this some more thought and I think the solution is: two battery packs in the Treo. One for the Treo and the GPRS and an extra lid on the back for 4 AAA's. The WiFi part should not pull power from the internal Treo battery, but the Treo can in some cases continue with the power from the AAA's (you can select that in the Prefs settings). You can also turn the WiFi off (when you know there is no coverage or you're not gonna use it). You can then even take the AAA's out.

    Like when you are in recreational clothes you can put the Treo in your pocket without it pulling down your shorts or shirt as some block of lead. You know, that 'postman with biting dog pulling down uniform' sensation... But once you're properly installed on a comfy chair besides the pool you take a fresh packet of Duracell's or charged to the brim batteries and put them in the Treo. At work the extra weight of four AAAs (or perhaps even two are enough?) don't matter much in the inside pocket of your suit/jacket.

    I'd suggest the batteries should get a place in a 'pocket' vertically there where you'd see a springboard on the Visors. The design has a 'natural' place for it. When you take a look at your Treo from above you see the antenna, the LED and the silence-switch on a kind of black 'island'. This should be just about 1cm bigger on the backside of the Treo. That whole black 'power interface island' should become the door for the AAA's then. But to still make it slide easily in your pocket (unlike the VisorPhone) the AAA's should go slightly inwards the case of the Treo on their other end, only a few milimeters. This whole 'pocket' should go all the way down, decreasing in volume, to the SIM door or even lower in one -4 vertical AAA's wide- line where the line dissolves. No edges, just beautiful (design award winning) lines.

    I would like to be a beta tester!
    ReindeR
  5. #5  
    This will all be moot once tmobile (inevitably) changes their data pricing plans. Sprint just announced $10 unlimited monthly data plans which is outrageously cheap. The rest will be forced to follow. If not to $10, then at least close...
    TM
  6.    #6  
    Originally posted by anthonymoody
    This will all be moot once tmobile (inevitably) changes their data pricing plans. Sprint just announced $10 unlimited monthly data plans which is outrageously cheap. The rest will be forced to follow. If not to $10, then at least close...
    TM
    I see several reasons why GPRS will inevitably always be more expensive than WiFi. 1. Telco's in Europe paid enormous fortunes for licenses. The only way to get those investments back is by letting people pay for datatraffic (and stimulating them to use 'multimedia'). 2. Consumers are dependent on the few networks of the telcos to use GPRS, while any teenagers can set up local, free WiFi access. 3. The pricing is different, GPRS data use can easily be metered and billed, that's the business of telcos. Paid WiFi networks are often set up as an extra service to make staying in a certain area more pleasant (hotel lobby, airport lounge, coffeeshop), which needs completely different marketing approaches.

    One can't rely on worldwide coverage with WiFi, for reliability switch to GPRS. But in certain areas you can give WiFi a try. Therefore we need both GPRS and WiFi in the same 'communicator'.
    ReindeR
  7. #7  
    Originally posted by reinder.rustema


    I see several reasons why GPRS will inevitably always be more expensive than WiFi. 1. Telco's in Europe paid enormous fortunes for licenses. The only way to get those investments back is by letting people pay for datatraffic (and stimulating them to use 'multimedia').
    Hmmm... no. They paid absurd sums for the UMTS licenses (W-CDMA, 3rd mobile Generation, and incompatible with GSM). GPRS (sometimes called 2,5G) is a totally different beast, and came at "equipment cost", no license required (it works over GSM). I may be mistaken, but I think noone is using UMTS in Europe, yet, due to the lack of affordable (and usable) phones.

    Regarding GPRS, operators do have to cover the equipment expenses, and pay for their bandwidth usage, but I think it is waaaaaay overpriced (I'm paying 10 EUR for 2 Mb/month. ugh!)

    I'd really like to see a WiFi (plus GSM) Treo. Or, better yet, an expansion sleeve for current Treos which would allow using CF/SD cards or PC cards. Then, I could have a networked Treo both at home and in the office without worrying myself about the size of the information I'm downloading. GPRS would be useful for those "on the road" moments, holidays, or vacations.
  8. #8  
    What is the point of having a WiFi connection at home or work when you have a better net experiencing on a desktop computer or notebook computer?
    My life is in my Treo... Where is yours?
  9. #9  
    Originally posted by yardie
    What is the point of having a WiFi connection at home or work when you have a better net experiencing on a desktop computer or notebook computer?
    The Treo is always with me (In meetings, when I'm out for coffee, when I'm in the living room stretching out in the couch). The laptop isn't. Instead of excusing myself from a meeting and say "let me just go and check my Inbox to confirm that", I could just say "nope, you're dead wrong".
  10. #10  
    But wifi just isnt necessary. Sprint is only charging $10 month. That's $10/month for *unlimited* data transfer. TMobile is still more expensive but come on, at $10/month there's no reason to incur an extra hardware cost (i.e. a wifi receiver) in a phone unless you think the extra speed of wi-fi will be very compelling. I've tried a friends Sprint 300 and browsing is VERY fast, and coverage is very good. So why add wi-fi? Unlimited data plans will become the norm, regardless of the underlying pricing faced by providers.
    TM
  11.    #11  
    Originally posted by anthonymoody
    But wifi just isnt necessary. Unlimited data plans will become the norm, regardless of the underlying pricing faced by providers.
    I prefer to think of Sprint as the temporary exception and only on the US market. I remember when GSM phones in Europe were once 'free' with a GSM subscription. A trick to gain market share. Sooner or later prices go up. There is no such thing as a free lunch, nor 'unlimited'. WiFi is fundamentally different. You, friends or employer can become wireless 'service provider', the data will be as free as the signals going from your remote control to your television set. You only need to invest in the hardware. Hardware I would like to buy from Handspring.
    ReindeR
  12. #12  
    You can prefer to think of Sprint any way you want. That doesnt change the fact that their all-you-can-eat plan will have major an irreversible shifts in the data market in the US. And for the record, prices don't always go up. In fact, the complete opposite is amlost always true. It's called commoditization. You can still walk into any phone store and choose any number of phones for free. They tend to be last years hot models (or the year before). Same as it ever was. Has nothing to do with service pricing and everything to do with obsolescence and subsidies from carriers.

    As for prices going up, the only remotely similar example here in the US was when all-you-can-eat ISPs went to $9.99 and lower (some even trying free) before the pendulum swung the other way and settled back to around $20-25/month and broadband at $40-50/month. Prices rose, but they didn't remove the all-you-can-eat option.

    Say what you like about the ability to track, meter and bill for data use via GPRS and Sprint's service. However, in the US people are used to unlimited plans for data. The carriers will have to figure out the right monthly price for an unlimited plan to balance their overhead with market acceptance. And they will - my guess is $20/month.

    TM
  13.    #13  
    I guess the US market is fundamentally different from the European market.
    ReindeR

Posting Permissions