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  1.    #21  
    Originally posted by dmw819
    I've had Treo since tuesday, I was provisioned for data and voice in one hour, and I'm getting "pushed" email from my corp server, after downloading both client and workstation software (app for the Treo has to be downloaded and sync'd, software for PC Workstation comes on the CD ROM).

    I've downloaded and easily sync'd personal mail using AOL Mail for Palm, and messaging with AOL AIM for Palm.

    My phone works in my house (neither a nokia or nextel would work in my house) and that's awesome just by itself. I've had some fades inside, but not once on the road in Southern California have I had an actual dropped call. Zero so far, and I've roamed about 50 mile radius.

    the mail functions alone are totally awesome - - I have reset Treo''s buttons and with one press, my work mail is waiting for me, no "syncing" required, no vibrate or sound....it's just there when I want to look at it. And I can respond virtually anywhere I am, and time.

    My humble final verdict is there are a few minor annoyances as with any new product, but the mail functions have put both my corp and private email in my hand and this has changed the way I work already....makes it quite easier to navigate the day.
    Hey thats awesome.You are the first one on the board saying that you are getting pushed corporate mail! Can you give more details..how you configured it/what plan you are on/ how much mins you spend dialing in if at all/ what speeds etc...you may also want to take a look at my questions above..Thanks a lot!
  2. #22  
    hi there

    check out my previous post a few days ago, "email push/pull procedure."

    I am not the only one rec'ving corp email there are lots of folks who are doing this already.

    It requires downloading and syncing the BC software applet for Treo, then "syncing" Treo and installing the applet. Once you do, you can set the "push" function easily as just "push mail," no sync, no interval.

    It also requires loading the CD ROM BC software on your PC workstation, and auto-configures to your network, mostly. Then you logon to bc.sprintpcs.com, separate login, name, password, and configure. Two tabs, "Alerts" and "Devices" have commands to "turn off alerts," and this must be done on the web login page for your Treo also. This points your mail to the right "device," e.g. Treo.

    So there are three major steps - - applet to Treo, software loaded on Workstation/Server (Outlook set to "default mail app" by you or your IT staff and POP3 must be enabled on the server) and then the bc.sprintpcs.com login and configuration. BC acts as the "intermediary" step, your mail is sent to the PCS server, and than forwarded to you.

    ALL "alerts"MUST BE TURNED OFF, on Treo and workstation/server settings, and or you get an SMS "Alert" each time you get mail, rather than a push.
  3.    #23  
    thanks...will try that and revert to you- i know a few people who are still having problems with it
  4. #24  
    this took us a few hours to set up......but it's worth it.....works great.

    what you're doing is really configuring your server to use bs.sprintpcs.com as an "intermediary." sprint gets your mail from your server, and then forwards the mail to Treo.

    with BC, keep in mind you're setting up a conduit from your Outlook mail server, to sprint's bc server, to your treo, and back again. The way BC communicates to your Treo is in the device tab and alerts tab.

    Your workstation must have prefs set to make outlook as default mail app (not Outlook express from what I understand) you can ask IT folks how to do this, and the workstation software kinda configures itself if you install it on the network workstation you are using.

    I have not used the corporate BC version, just personal, so far.
  5. #25  
    can't see minutes but I'm not "dialing in" really

    The mail is "pushed" to Treo and it does a "sync" by itself, no command from me. I reset my "to do" list button to one click into Biz Con applet, so I pop open the lid, press one button, and my mail is waiting.

    The "sync" takes about 30 seconds depending on how many mail messages. It's transparent to the user. And it happens even when phone is "asleep"

    I have 800/5200 8 MB no way to measure data yet, until first billing cycle.
  6.    #26  
    hi
    the push system works when it wants to, not all the time...also the phone sometimes goes just dead..all systems down even it is fully charged...the speeds in the Boston and DC areas dont seem to be yet at full throttle with varying reports of it
  7. #27  
    Originally posted by dmw819
    hi there

    check out my previous post a few days ago, "email push/pull procedure."

    I am not the only one rec'ving corp email there are lots of folks who are doing this already.

    It requires downloading and syncing the BC software applet for Treo, then "syncing" Treo and installing the applet. Once you do, you can set the "push" function easily as just "push mail," no sync, no interval.

    It also requires loading the CD ROM BC software on your PC workstation, and auto-configures to your network, mostly. Then you logon to bc.sprintpcs.com, separate login, name, password, and configure. Two tabs, "Alerts" and "Devices" have commands to "turn off alerts," and this must be done on the web login page for your Treo also. This points your mail to the right "device," e.g. Treo.

    So there are three major steps - - applet to Treo, software loaded on Workstation/Server (Outlook set to "default mail app" by you or your IT staff and POP3 must be enabled on the server) and then the bc.sprintpcs.com login and configuration. BC acts as the "intermediary" step, your mail is sent to the PCS server, and than forwarded to you.

    ALL "alerts"MUST BE TURNED OFF, on Treo and workstation/server settings, and or you get an SMS "Alert" each time you get mail, rather than a push.

    All my alerts are turned on on the web site but I have yet to get an sms message. I do get routines syncs with a mail alert using the smart sync and pushed mail options.
  8. #28  
    From my standpoint, the phone and PDA functions work great. I'm more than a little disappointed in the whole data provisioning process for existing Sprint users, however.

    I transferred my old Sprint service over to my lovely new Treo last week and was told that it would take 24 hours to provision it for the web....So I waited...and waited. I expected some kind of notification via SMS or something. I called a few hours before the 24 hours was up and they told me to wait some more. I tried connecting to the internet after the 24 hours and got a note about the Network being busy or no data connection so I called. A rep told me I needed to go to the website and change my password before it would work.

    Unfortunately, I went to the website and changed my userid before changing my password....big problems. It did actually work for a few hours with my old userid and password, but hasn't worked since. Many calls and tickets later, I've now had a Sev 1 ticket in with Sprint for over 72 hours and still can't connect to the net.
  9. #29  
    so far i'm "pushed" mail - - and I preferred it this way I was actually getting annoying SMS messages each time a new email arrived.

    There are also settings on the Treo to set prefs for incoming...you can choose "alerts" also on the client applet.....this must be turned "on" to get an SMS message.
  10. #30  
    Originally posted by work_permit
    7)Would you recommend this over the Nokia 9290 COmmunicator?

    A friend had this on demo. Big, clunky, ugly brick. Big screen.
    640 pixels wide, which is quite impressive for a handheld, and is certainly far superior for web browsing than 160 pixels wide. The screen is pretty squat, though, at 200 pixels high. 16 grays means a quite a bit less satisfying web browsing experience than on a color screen like the Treo's.

    Keyboard surprisingly not such a big win over treo keyboard.
    Yeah, since you can't really use it standing up. QWERTY Thumb-board seems to be the best input device for PDA/phone devices.

    Not sure what os it was running, using it seemed confusing. The whole look, feel, and usage model struck me as retro. Total dud imho.
    The 9290 runs the Symbian OS, the descendent of the OS on the Psion handhelds, which were formerly fairly popular, particularly in Europe, but now have an ever-shrinking market share (Psion announced some time ago that it's getting out of the consumer PDA space). Symbian seems to be doing better than Psion was, though, getting its OS into Nokia, Sony Ericsson, and other phones.

    In terms of "modern OS features" like preemptive multitasking, protected memory, etc., Symbian kicks the Palm OS's ****. At one time, Palm was talking to Symbian to provide the kernel for the new ARM-based version of the Palm OS -- that deal probably went away after Palm bought the BeOS. Naturally having modern low-level OS features doesn't mean the general user experience will be as nice as with a Palm, but certainly as the promise of 3G speeds and "always-on" start to be fulfilled, one will want a modern OS to be able to take advantage of this.

    At least from a standpoint of 3rd-party software being available, Symbian seems a better bet than, say, the upcoming Danger Hiptop, which will be a whole new platform. Symbian isn't nearly as good a bet as Palm or PocketPC PDA/phones, of course. (And if there's ever a PDA/phone running Linux, as some PDAs like the Sharp Zaurus do, it'll also be a better bet for 3rd-party software.)
  11.    #31  
    agree with you dharness. 9290 seems to have its act together..sprint, we are unable to log on to their website for almost 48 hrs now..wonder whats happening?
  12. #32  
    Originally posted by e.lo


    The difference between 3G (CDMA2000) and the older CDMA system results in less dropped calls and more connections to the cell towers. They can now handle 4 times as many connections to the towers. Spoke to a Sprint PCS tech earlier yesterday.

    So far he is right, I have not a signal faded or dropped call yet in the usual spots that I do get them.
    Interesting, I get more dropped calls and signal faded with the Treo 300 than I did with my old 2g Samsung 8500 (which I forced to run in Sprint PCS digital mode only).

    Could be that in general, I think the 300 is worse at reception due to the little stubby antenna?
  13. #33  
    Originally posted by athreya
    agree with you dharness.
    "dharness"?
  14. #34  
    Originally posted by doctorc


    Interesting, I get more dropped calls and signal faded with the Treo 300 than I did with my old 2g Samsung 8500 (which I forced to run in Sprint PCS digital mode only).

    Could be that in general, I think the 300 is worse at reception due to the little stubby antenna?
    yea i get considerable worse signal strength compared to the sanyo 4900 i had for a few days before the treos were in stock again. hasn't been a problem so far and i still get reception down in the basement its just a half signal strength instead of full...
  15. #35  
    Originally posted by Dan Harkless
    "dharness"?
    Must have been referring to work...back in 'd harness again
  16. #36  
    Interesting, I get more dropped calls and signal faded with the Treo 300 than I did with my old 2g Samsung 8500 (which I forced to run in Sprint PCS digital mode only).

    Could be that in general, I think the 300 is worse at reception due to the little stubby antenna?
    In Orlando, FL I get much better reception then my previous 2G phone, Samsung a460 and Motorola Timeport. I have had the phone for at least a week and had not had 1 dropped call or faded signal in the usual spots that I get these.
  17.    #37  
    no one at handspring or sprint seems to know the diff between treo mail and sprint BC..they say its similar but dont know what it is..also they say for treo mail to work one doesnt need to leave the compter on at all! any thoughts?

    btw if we go for the 20MB plan can we downgrade after three months or only upgrade? some peope tell me downgrade is tough
  18. #38  
    Originally posted by Dan Harkless
    640 pixels wide, which is quite impressive for a handheld, and is certainly far superior for web browsing than 160 pixels wide. The screen is pretty squat, though, at 200 pixels high. 16 grays means a quite a bit less satisfying web browsing experience than on a color screen like the Treo's.
    The site I got that "16 grays" figure from was either in error or I was looking at the wrong model. A commercial for the 9290 just reminded me that it has a color screen.

    Nokia's so-called "Full Specifications" page for the 9290 doesn't even bother to mention whether the screen is color or greyscale, but I found on another site that it's 12-bit (4096) color.
  19. #39  
    Originally posted by e.lo


    The difference between 3G (CDMA2000) and the older CDMA system results in less dropped calls and more connections to the cell towers. They can now handle 4 times as many connections to the towers. Spoke to a Sprint PCS tech earlier yesterday.

    So far he is right, I have not a signal faded or dropped call yet in the usual spots that I do get them.

    I have only seen a slight improvement. The calls still drop and fade in the same places, but at my friend's house where no I had no signal now I get enought to make a call. That might be due to more power or better antenna in the phone. I was using the Motorola VTech phone before.
  20. #40  
    Originally posted by Dan Harkless
    640 pixels wide, which is quite impressive for a handheld, and is certainly far superior for web browsing than 160 pixels wide. The screen is pretty squat, though, at 200 pixels high.
    Occurred to me today while researching the various SSH clients available for the different handheld platforms that the 9290's 640x200 display would not only be much nicer for web browsing than the Treo's 160x160, but would make it the only truly comfortable PDA/phone platform for SSH/telnet sessions.

    With an 8x8 pixel font, you could get the standard TTY's 80x25 (or 80x24, with a status line) characters on the 9290, while a Palm phone would only give you 20x20 characters. That would mean painfully wrapped lines or a lot of horizontal scrolling. A PocketPC phone (not a SmartPhone 2002, which has a lower-res. screen) would give 30x40 characters (or 40x30 with a third-party landscape mode driver). Of course the PocketPC phone figures don't allow space for an onscreen keyboard...

    Going down to a 6x8 font (about the bare minimum for legibility on the whole ASCII character range) would get you 106x25 characters on the 9290, 26x20 characters on a Palm phone, and 40x40 chars. (or 53x30 in landscape mode) on a PocketPC phone (again, assuming no onscreen keyboard).

    So the 9290 is the only way you could get an 80-column screen, something that would be a great joy to people who'd like to do remote administration. I guess if you went down to a 4x8 font (which allows all alphanumerics to be readable, if painful, but can't render some punctuation very recognizably), a PocketPC in 320x240 landscape mode (assuming the SSH app. cooperated with the 3rd-party virtual display driver) could do 80x30 (or possibly 80x24 plus an onscreen keyboard).

    All of this only is considering ASCII characters, of course. Full ISO-8859-1 would take bigger fonts. The 9290 would still be able to do its 80 columns, though -- it just wouldn't get as many rows (16 of them for an 8x12 font).

    Hmm, I'm starting to warm up to the 9290...

    But wait! I just noticed the 9290 isn't GPRS-capable, and according to this alt.cellular.nokia post, it never will be. Grrrr.

    Also, relative to my comments about web browsing on the 9290, I'm sure the lack of a touch screen hurts that experience quite a bit. I wonder how they handle image maps? Must be a pain in the ****...
    Last edited by Dan Harkless; 08/24/2002 at 05:47 AM.
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