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  1.    #1  
    From a current i300 owner (and now Treo owner, but only temporarily):

    In no particular order:

    1. The 4 buttons in graffiti are not present -- apparently they are part of the thumbboard but it is hard to get used to. I much prefer them easily accessible on the screen. Annoying the hell out of me. (This is a problem with all Treos since they don't have graffiti, and I probably could get used to it).

    2. WHY DOES IT ALWAYS REVERT TO MY PHONEBOOK/SPEED DIAL? I really, really freaking hate that. I want to start with either my phone or Launcher. (I fixed this with Treo Button).

    3. The phonebook SUCKS. The font is like 24 point and you get about 2 entries per screen. If you have a huge phone book (like me), scrolling takes an hour. Sure you can type, but.... The i300/Palm OS solution of only showing ONE entry per name is much, much better. Showing every phone number for each name is ludicrous. Some of my names take up a whole screen!

    4. The screen is incredibly flexible and probably fragile. If you touch it gets a huge indentation in the color. Very poor.

    5. The Palm software is just weird. Sorry I can't be more specific on that. I've gone from Palm III to V to Vx to i300 and this is just a major step backwards in interface.

    6. I've just now discovered that there is no Blackberry with the Treo. Talk about false advertising. It's basically the same thing as the i300. They have Treo Mail, which is the same as Business Connect, except you have to pay for it. What a FREAKING RIPOFF.
    I thought this thing also worked like a Blackberry. No such luck.
    Last edited by masonuc; 08/09/2002 at 11:56 PM.
  2. #2  
    As a fellow i-300 user, I'd suggest trying it for a week before returning it
    The 4 buttons in graffiti are not present -- apparently they are part of the thumbboard but it is hard to get used to
    Annoyed me a hell of alot more yesterday than today. Still annoys me, but less today.
    The phonebook SUCKS. The font is like 24 point and you get about 2 entries per screen. If you have a huge phone book (like me), scrolling takes an hour. Sure you can type, but
    It seems like they've designed it around typing and using your finger. In the positve side, you can use the phone book without using the stylus. Haven't tried replacing fonts with something like
    http://www.visorvillage.com/software...3-palm-pc.html

    I thought this thing also worked like a Blackberry. No such luck.
    This is a very good question. Does the device still go through a "signing on, connecting" stage? I thought this whole 3G tecnhology is supposed to give an "always on" experience.

    Certainly sprint advertises it that way
    http://www1.sprintpcs.com/explore/bu...artState=group

    http://www.cdg.org/events/CDMASemina...de_17_9h45.pdf

    http://www.sprint.com/vision/
    Last edited by work_permit; 08/10/2002 at 12:51 AM.
  3. #3  
    3. The phonebook SUCKS. The font is like 24 point and you get about 2 entries per screen. If you have a huge phone book (like me), scrolling takes an hour. Sure you can type, but.... The i300/Palm OS solution of only showing ONE entry per name is much, much better. Showing every phone number for each name is ludicrous. Some of my names take up a whole screen!
    Quick tip which might make this more manageable for you - the phonebook screen is designed to take advantage of Treo's instant lookup feature and the jog dial. If you want to look up a name, just type the first initial, then the last initial while on the phonebook screen. The screen will display a much smaller list of all the names that match. If the list is too long, type the next letter of the last name, and the list will narrow again. Once you have a small enough list (usually only takes me the first and last initials), you can use the jog dial to scroll through the numbers, then push the jog dial in to dial the number you've selected.

    Took me a little bit to get used to, but with the instant lookup feature and the keyboard, it's actually MUCH MUCH faster for me to lookup a name on my Treo than on any other palm device I've ever had.

    Hope that helps!

    6. I've just now discovered that there is no Blackberry with the Treo. Talk about false advertising. It's basically the same thing as the i300. They have Treo Mail, which is the same as Business Connect, except you have to pay for it. What a FREAKING RIPOFF.
    I'm not sure what the i300 has, but remember that you have to pay monthly service fees for your blackberry. If you combine treo mail's service costs ($99/year for corporate behind-the-firewall edition, or about $8/month) with Sprint's airtime fees (I heard about $20/month for 8MB?), it actually works out to be cheaper than blackberry's $40/month fees. Since Treo mail actually uses servers that Handspring hosts to redirect your email, compress it, strip out attachments, etc., there are ongoing costs that they incur, so it doesn't surprise me that they have to charge you a recurring annual fee. The one downside is if you are a real heavy mobile email user, then the blackberry might be cheaper because you get unlimited airtime with it. Anyone know how many emails 8mb a month would be?

    Overall though, in my mind, seems to be a pretty reasonable fee for what you get, although I haven't tried out Business Connect yet. Is it the same price as Treo mail?
  4.    #4  
    Business Connect is the same thing as Treo Mail and it is free, I think (or at least free for me -- I was the first 50,000 customers or whatever. But I think it's 2.99 a month or something if not free).

    You're missing the whole point. Blackberry may be more expensive, but it's a 100 times better. With Treo Mail/Business Connection, your desktop has to be on. That's fine 90% of the time, but I'd pay a lot more to have a true Blackberry always-on, desktop can be off service.
  5. #5  
    Originally posted by masonuc
    You're missing the whole point. Blackberry may be more expensive, but it's a 100 times better. With Treo Mail/Business Connection, your desktop has to be on. That's fine 90% of the time, but I'd pay a lot more to have a true Blackberry always-on, desktop can be off service.
    Keep in mind that in order to support that "desktop off" type of service, you must be running (IIRC) an Exchange SERVER, and have a copy of the Blackberry Enterprise Service configured to run on that server. So, if your corporation already has that - great. But not everyone does ... and it's not small cost if you don't have it. In those instances, the alternate Blackberry solution is (again, IIRC) a "desktop on" solution that hooks into Outlook, much like BaseJet, TreoMail, or BusinessConnect.

    Yes, the CFO of "XYZ Corporation" has always-on BlackBerry email. But in order to support that solution, I would estimate that it cost roughly the following:

    1. Blackberry Pager: $399
    2. Exchange Server: $850
    3. Blackberry Enterprise Service: (I don't know if they charge $ for this)
    4. Unlimited Blackberry wireless service/year: $468 ($39 * 12 mos)
    5. Dedicated hardware to run Exchange Server: $1,000 for a cheap low-end server
    6. Dedicated fractional T-1 service: $4,800 (assuming $400/mo combined access and local loop costs * 12 mos)

    So ... um ... about $3,000 to support Blackberry for one user for one year. Economy of scale kicks in as you add more users, but this is why Blackberry has penetration in the enterprise and not so much elsewhere. The average joe can't afford the "desktop off" version.

    I have a Blackberry for my company ... but prefer my Treo. The Blackberry is pretty much a one-trick pony. Email. Yes, it does it very well. But it doesn't do anything else well at all. I much prefer my Palm which does many, many things well -- and will soon be getting better with "push" type email as 3G services go online, and software companies update their Palm-based email clients to take advantage of an "always-on" connection.

    It's coming. Soon. It's just not here immediately today.

    -Doug

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