Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 42
  1.    #1  
    Can anyone tell me (and this question is regards to email only, not the other functions of the blackberry)....I love the Blackberry's email function...it's always on, and I don't have to dial in to pick up my email. Will the Treo 300 have a similar capability???
  2. #2  
    While I don't presently have a Treo to try this on, the documentation for the Palm client you can download to the Treo in order to use the SprintPCS Business Connection software to access your office email indicates that you can configure the "push" scheduling for the email.

    The documentation provides scheduling options for no scheduled sync or push, smart power sync which "dynamically manages the sync schedule based on how much power your Palm-powered PCS phone has", and custom sync settings which "let you define the synchronization schedule based on new mail arriving or on a static schedule for weekdays and weekends."

    You can also, according to the documentation, select when you sync with the server whether you want a defined maximum number of the most recently received messages or all the messages received within a certain time frame. This is to save on storage space on the phone. Additionally, the documenation indicates that you can set mail filters which would allow you to specify which messages are downloaded as well as the maximum size of a message to be downloaded.

    Finally, it would appear that you can also define alerts so that new mail would cause the phone to either vibrate or provide an audible alert
  3. #3  
    Originally posted by chrisjoseph
    Can anyone tell me (and this question is regards to email only, not the other functions of the blackberry)....I love the Blackberry's email function...it's always on, and I don't have to dial in to pick up my email. Will the Treo 300 have a similar capability???
    Unfortunatelly no. Assuming you're willing to fork over more monthly fees over the already pricey voice/data plan, best you can get is periodic polling, not push e-mail.

    While periodic polling can get pretty close to the feel of push e-mail, the drawback is reduced battery life and a high data traffic bill.

    You know that instant messaging - like feel of the BlackBerry? Like when you send an e-mail, the other guy gets it, replies to you and you get it, all within the space of 10-15 seconds?

    You just can't get that with periodic polling (well, you could, if you polled every 15 seconds, but the battery would die in a matter of hours, your bill would be in middle tripple digits and the network would die if all the Treos would do it every 15 seconds). I wish Handspring would just get their act together and do it right: push e-mail, with a flat fee for all you can eat, sigh..., like the BlackBerry.
  4. #4  
    Battery life on the GPRS RIM devices is using periodic checking. That is the only mode available on the GPRS packet network. They must suffer from similar battery life issues.

    A RIM pages on the Motient data only network can do true push email but it cannot also be a phone.

    The combination of voice AND data requires you to make battery life decisions. I personally dont mind the lack of instantaneous email reception. I use TreoMail all the time but I use SMS messaging if I need to get hold of a co-worker instantly. We are all on Treos :-)
  5. #5  
    Originally posted by meta_dave
    Battery life on the GPRS RIM devices is using periodic checking. That is the only mode available on the GPRS packet network. They must suffer from similar battery life issues.
    Your intuition is justified, but from what I understand, they overcame the problem of dynamic IP address allocation, to give true push. I've seen a GPRS BlackBerry in use, and it's just as responsive as the Mobitex device, if not more.

    Battery life is about half that of the Mobitex one (about 10 days of standby), but I think that reduction is caused by architectural considerations of GPRS (at the lowest radio protocol levels, the device has to talk to the network a lot more often than in Mobitex).
  6.    #6  
    Not sure I understand your post...are you saying the Treo 300 has push email?
  7. #7  
    Originally posted by chrisjoseph
    Not sure I understand your post...are you saying the Treo 300 has push email?
    No, what it does is automatically check for new mail every once in a while.

    While this could be called 'automatic delivery', it's not true push. It's not as responsive, drains the battery, increases your bill and if done by many devices, causes congestion on the network.
  8. #8  
    I've seen a GPRS BlackBerry in use, and it's just as responsive as the Mobitex device, if not more.
    Are you saying that the treo 300 on the sprint network will be less responive than a GPRS blackberry? Or a GPRS treo 270 (when gprs becomes available?)
  9. #9  
    Remember, though, that Treo Mail lets you get just SMS notifications when you have new mail - you don't have to use automatic retrieval mode. SMS is low bandwidth and low power drain. When you get a notification, you can manually connect and pull down your email just by holding down the messaging button for a few secs (furthest button on the right). That way, you only connect when you want to, your costs and battery drain are minimal, and you still get notified when you have new mail.

    It's been much better for me than automatic retrieval. I find out when I have new mail, and when I have time to read it, it only takes a few seconds to pull down my mail on my Treo 180, and that's not even with GPRS. With Treo 300, you should be able to pull down all your mail in a snap since the connection speed is sooooo much faster (supposedly).

    Given that, what's the big deal with push? I'm always confused by this - I've never used a blackberry myself, but heard a lot about them. Seems like as long as I get notified when I have new mail and I can get it in a snap, I don't need it to be downloading my mail all the time in the background for me, especially if it's going to drain my battery. What Treo Mail does with SMS notifications actually seems smarter to me than this constant loading in the background draining power and using up your data allotment.

    Can anyone explain to me what advantage push has over what I just described? That's what Treo mail has been like for me since I started using it, and I love it. I can't imagine not having my email with me on the go anymore - although it can be a curse too to always be able to get your work email
  10. #10  
    Does Sprint Business Connection mail allow for sending of an SMS message when you get new mail so you can do something similar to what Treo Mail (Sark28 describes above) does for the Treo 300?
    Roger
  11. #11  
    Originally posted by RLewis
    Does Sprint Business Connection mail allow for sending of an SMS message when you get new mail so you can do something similar to what Treo Mail (Sark28 describes above) does for the Treo 300?
    Yes, you can configure Business Connection to send an SMS message to the phone based upon a number of filter combinations (e.g., specific name in the To: line, message marked with high priority, etc.)
  12. #12  
    Why can't the app be configured to download email when you get an sms message? wouldn't that give a full "push" experience?
  13. #13  
    Originally posted by work_permit
    Why can't the app be configured to download email when you get an sms message? wouldn't that give a full "push" experience?
    Technically, that would be considered more of a "triggered pull" instead of a "push", but the end-user experience would be similar. That's exactly what Basejet (http://www.basejet.com) does. It's about as close to a blackberry solution as I've found, yet still working on legacy 2G networks (GSM and plain ol' CDMA) - and working well, at that. When 3G is fully here, I expect that applicaiton will get even better.

    When I work out at the gym, my phone goes in the locker. When I get done with my workout, it's received any new messages, so I just push the mail button to turn the screen on and see what's there. It's great.

    Oh, and it handles attachments nicely, has a great visual interface, and you can navigate through all your mail without opening the lid. I'm a big fan.

    -Doug
  14.    #14  
    Well, I'm looking forward to seeing a review or reviews from Treo 300 users on this issue. I would buy one in a second if I could get it with push email.
  15.    #15  
    Well, now I'm really confused. The Handspring website says this in their Q and A section:

    Q. Is email always on?
    A. With Treo 300, your data connection can be persistent therefore supporting solutions that provide "always on" email (it actually stays connected after you finish browsing as well). You do not have to dial up an ISP to get your email—you have instant access to new email.


    So, I will ask you all again: is this true "push" email, like the Blackberry??
  16. #16  
    And I'll ask you all again as well - what's the big deal about "push" vs. the experience I described above?
  17.    #17  
    Good question. Since I've never owned a Treo, and I own a Blackberry, I only know my own experience. What you describe sounds like a nice way to retrieve email. However, I'm going to wait for Walter Mossberg's review in the Personal Tech column of the Wall Street Journal. He writes the best computer/technology articles I've read.
  18. #18  
    Originally posted by work_permit
    Are you saying that the treo 300 on the sprint network will be less responive than a GPRS blackberry? Or a GPRS treo 270 (when gprs becomes available?)
    That's exactly what I'm saying.

    You see, this has nothing to do with transport speeds (aka. bandwidth) It has everything to do with the timeliness of the notification (aka latency).

    Ultimately, Handspring will have to build a push based network to compete.
  19. #19  
    Originally posted by sark28
    Remember, though, that Treo Mail lets you get just SMS notifications when you have new mail - you don't have to use automatic retrieval mode. SMS is low bandwidth and low power drain. When you get a notification, you can manually connect and pull down your email just by holding down the messaging button for a few secs (furthest button on the right).
    There are a few drawbacks to this:

    1) Most people (I'm talking worldwide) have to pay for each SMS. It's a cash cow for the operators, so that's not likely to change.
    2) If you get 10 or more messages a day, I think you'd have to agree that having to ask to pull down each time is pretty cumbersome.
    3) The act of receiving takes three or more packets (the SMS notification, the request, and the response), vs. one packet (the e-mail coming down) in true push. Radio transmission power can easily account for 50% or more of device power consumption, so being 3 times more efficient is very important to overall battery life.
  20. #20  
    Originally posted by chrisjoseph
    So, I will ask you all again: is this true "push" email, like the Blackberry??
    No.

    They're 'always on' in the same way that PC are 'always on' the internet when connected through DSL or cable.

    The data connection is there, but you still need software to do the e-mail transfer.

    Notice however that on your PC, Outlook Express (or something like it) will pull down your e-mail every 10 minutes or so.

    Just because the data connection is always on doesn't mean that the e-mail is pushed to you.

    This is why they state that the Treo could support solutions that would give true push in their FAQ. The devil is in the details.
    Last edited by Akbar69; 08/12/2002 at 11:44 AM.
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions