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  1.    #1  
    where the heck is the gprs patch???? its august already and still no word on when it will be out!!!
  2. #2  
    Yah, where's the patch for GPRS update????????
  3. #3  
    I heard some thing about the end of September

    I also very nervos getting it but i also heard that there are some mayor bug´s which thy wont to fix first!
    Slower than my NR70 was but i love my Treo 270......
  4. #4  
    Oh God I love it!

    First Handspring gets clobbered because QA because of the headset and backlight failures. The hew and cry was "Obviously Handspring has NO Quality Control. Oh WO is us!!!!". Now they are getting clobbered because some one has ants in their pants for the packet radio update.

    Maybe it's in QA, to make sure it WORKS, and still pending approval.

    ***** ***** ***** ***** *****

    Gary
  5. #5  
    Originally posted by Gary G. Little


    ***** ***** ***** ***** *****

    Gary
    *****: noun, a vulgar referrence to a female canine
    verb, to complain profusely, as in "It is a GI's right to *****.
  6. #6  
    Originally posted by Gary G. Little


    *****: noun, a vulgar referrence to a female canine
    verb, to complain profusely, as in "It is a GI's right to *****.
    Hahahahaha!
    --Inspector Gadget

    "Go Go Gadget Pre!!"
    Palm Pre on Sprint

    Palm V--> Palm IIIc--> Visor Prism--> Visor Phone--> Treo 270--> Treo 600--> Treo 650-->
    Treo 700wx--> HTC Touch Diamond--> Palm Pre & HTC EVO 4G.
  7. #7  
    By the way, I sent an email to Handspring Customer Support
    and inquired regarding the GPRS update,,, as usual, the same
    first liner... "Unfortunately we have no definite date, yet".

    :-(


    GMOJ
    -----------------------
    I Love My Treo270
  8. #8  
    I think it's small minded to criticize someone for complaining about the GPRS patch not being released yet. Especially from someone who hasn't shelled out $500 for the product. Many loyal Handspring customers bought the 270 in the good faith that the patch was not far away. The 270 was released months in advance of the 300, yet it appears that Handspring had the time to modify the Treo design to make sure that the 300 works at full speed on Sprint's new G3 network. If one had known that a full speed 300 would be released before the GPRS patch for the 270, it is logical to conclude that one might have just waited for the 300's release. The suspicion that I'm getting is that the manpower effort thrown into making the 300 work was at the expense of completing the GPRS patch for the 270 units already sold. In fairness, it is not unreasonable to have expected the patch to be fully tested and released before, or at the very least, the same time as the 300.
  9. #9  
    Originally posted by Bob-C
    In fairness, it is not unreasonable to have expected the patch to be fully tested and released before, or at the very least, the same time as the 300.
    Here is the deal. First, the 3 providers in North America for GSM service (AT&T, Voicestream and Cingular) each have very different networks, however VS and Cingular share 60% of each others gear.

    Now, imagine that you write code for one system and supposedly the other 2 should be the same, but when you go to run it, snap it doesn't work on the other 2. Play the back-and-forth game for several months and you get the picture.

    Now take Sprint. Single network, they developed their own standard therefore designing the "3G" layer on the Treo was a snap.

    Unfortunately HS also has to look beyond North America to the many other Euro/Asia GSM providers, their standards and networks and it becomes a real mess.

    The real people to blame are our beloved carriers. Standards mean just that, please don't deviate from them! As a frustrated developer for this and many other products, I can tell you that we are far from the Patch. My best assumption will be October. The T-Mobile PCMCIA card for GPRS only works for us 40% of the time in 13 markets. That is a horrible percentage.

    One last thing, the Treo 300 has yet to show the real power of Sprints 3G and will not for many months, mostly due in part that Sprints network is also not complete and full of holes.

    Here is how I look at it, if you need flawless international coverage, you get the 270, else go with Sprint.

    EOL
  10.    #10  
    WOW!!!! THANKS FOR THE VERY INSPIRING WORDS.... NOW I HAVE SOMETHING TO LOOK FORWARD TO... OCTOBER!!! I THOUGHT END OF AUGUST OR MAYBE EVEN SEPTEMBER!!! NEXT THING THEY'LL SAY IS CHRISTMAS!!! OR WHO KNOWS MAYBE EVEN 2003!!! I JUST HOPE THIS WILL ALL END SOON (THE WAITING GAME THAT IS...)

    BTW - HARD TO BELIEVE THAT GPRS PROVIDERS WORLD WIDE ARE USING DIFFERENT SYSTEMS (ISNT GPRS A SYSTEM IN ITSELF??? - JUST LIKE IF YOU SAY GSM - ITS THE SAME THING EVERYWHERE - THATS WHY A GSM PHONE WORKS WHETHER UR IN ASIA EUROPE OR AMERICA - COURSE THEY MAY HAVE DIFFRERENT FREQUENCIES BUT ITS THE SAME "SYSTEM!!!"
  11. #11  
    Originally posted by thegman
    Now, imagine that you write code for one system and supposedly the other 2 should be the same, but when you go to run it, snap it doesn't work on the other 2. Play the back-and-forth game for several months and you get the picture.
    You're probably right about the small differences between carriers, but I don't think that justifies the long delay for the patch. The GPRS BlackBerry works on all those carriers, so why can't the Treo?
  12. BNelson's Avatar
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    #12  
    The new T Mobile Pocket PC Phone Edition comes GPRS-ready, as well. And the GPRS works nationwide in the US...wherever there is GSM coverage.

    GPRS may have numerous holes in the system right now, and may not be perfect...but it's on web-enabled phones right NOW. Except for the Treo, of course.
  13. #13  
    Originally posted by Bob-C
    yet it appears that Handspring had the time to modify the Treo design to make sure that the 300 works at full speed on Sprint's new G3 network.
    This assumes it actually is faster
  14. #14  
    The bottom line is that the Treo GPRS patch is not ready for Prime Time. I refuse to load anything on my beloved Treo that is going to crash it several times a day. i would rather be patient have something rock solid.

    I agree with Gary G. Handspring cannot win. If they release something now, then people complain about how buggy the thing is..if they wait until there are less bugs and the update is more stable..then people complain. Its the same situation as people complaining about it is too hot when its the summer time and then complain how cold it is in the winter time.
  15. #15  
    I had no idea that the carriers could be that much different and I guess HS didn't either when they started working on the GPRS patch. Thanks for the explanation Gman. Knowing what is going on makes the wait a little easier. Any idea on how the speed will match up vs the 300?
  16. #16  
    Handspring may be in a no win situation, but it is one they have helped to create. Handspring probably knew or should have known that the GPRS patch would not be available until late 2002, if then. Nevertheless, Handspring created the expectation, with its own forward looking statements that coincided with the release of the Treo 180, that GPRS capabilities were just around the corner, probably to boost interest in its product and its stock price. So now, Treo 180 (especially) and Treo 270 users are stuck in this no-win situation with Handspring.

    One area that Handspring may be less complicit in once the GPRS patch is released is the less-than-stellar performance improvement GPRS will bring in terms of actual download and upload speeds. The Treo probably won't attain consistent download speeds of 56k claimed by such providers as TMobile. And some may complain that the data plans charged by such providers are unreasonable. These things may be completely out of Handspring's control, and it may be wise for them to add a disclaimer that performance results may vary from carrier to carrier and location to location. Still, any performance boost in the 28kb+ range would be fine for me, along with always on internet capabilities, since I only surf the internet and read e-mails on the Treo when I have no other choice. Most of the time, I depend on my laptop with 802.11b or DSL to do the serious web surfing, downloading, e-mail exchanging, etc. Just my $0.02
  17. #17  
    Originally posted by Bob-C
    Thanks for the explanation Gman. Knowing what is going on makes the wait a little easier. Any idea on how the speed will match up vs the 300?
    Sprint 3G = HYPE

    Here is something to think about. If you have ever owned any of Sprint's wireless solutions for a notebook or PocketPC, you'd already know that the speeds are nothing better than 14.4kbps and were only really designed for email.

    I have the T-Mobile 3G package for my notebook and it has its good and bad days. I wrote a small app to average bandwidth and I am running at 32kbps up and down. But remember, this is an average, there are days that it crawls and actually using dialup over the cell phone would be faster.

    Now, I move to my Treo where the only service is dial-up and for everything except browsing, I am happy. 3G will only "light up" my mobile browsing experience.

    Swapping pictures, MP3's and other junk like what the M-Life commercials portray is BS and honestly, not necessary. Look at it this way, if the technology is spotty in Asia/Japan, then don't expect miracles here.

    GMAN
  18. #18  
    I read with interest this topic... as I asked myself the same question!

    Sorry to say that I do not agree with you, Thegman.

    If you take a broader look at GPRS (and being less centered to the United States), you'll see that GPRS is now a standard that is widely used all over the world.
    Before having a Treo 270, I had a Motorola Accompli 008 (great phone: but I wanted a color screen!).
    The Accompli 008 is a geniune GPRS device.
    Because I travel a lot, I used it all over the world: Europe, Middle East, Asia...
    And it worked fine all over the place.
    I hardly believe that all manufacturers (from Motorola to Ericsson or LG) adapt their devices' software to every carrier in every country of the world.
    It would be quite impossible... without guarantee of success.
    Which would mean that a phone bought, say, in London might work with this carrier and not with that one in Paris, New York or Tokyo!
    While, in fact, you don't have such a problem.
    Why?
    Because GPRS (2G) is a well known system mastered by all phone / smartphone manufacturers worldwide... except for Handspring?

    What's more, most manufacturers are now moving to an enhancement to the current GPRS protocols, called 2+G.
    And more and more, from Nokia to Sagem or Motorola, you start to see devices 2+G-enabled.

    So why Handspring cannot provide what is becoming to be a basic feature on all phones, worldwide, on a device which is far to be the cheapest around?

    To answer that question, I would tend to agree with Bob-C who said that Handspring put all its workforce on the new Treo 300.
    Which means that they will be busy for still a couple of months (at least), to work on Treo 300 production bugs (as with any new communication product).
    What is in it for us, previous Treo owners?
    Well, I guess we'll have to wait even longer for our GPRS upgrade... as there is no one, at Handspring, to work on it.
    This is the reason why Handspring treo Customer Support does not give any answer when you ask them when the patch will be available, and why you hear rumors of September, October... or Christmas 2015!
  19. #19  
    Originally posted by dennis3232
    Because GPRS (2G) is a well known system mastered by all phone / smartphone manufacturers worldwide... except for Handspring?
    Let's take a look at GPRS. Originally rolled out in GSM networks on a trial/beta basis in 1999- 2000. T-Mobile in Summer of 2000 rolls out 28kbps service. Early 2001, some mobile phone makers implement GPRS functionality in the handset. Speeds on these devices run around 28.8 with some lucky people at 52kbps. Same year, cell capacity on GPRS GSM towers slows all service down. GPRS Phase 2/EDGE is delivered as an upgrade to these sites to increase throughput beyond 112kbps, however carriers slow to adopt.

    So here we are today, 2002. 63% of carriers have adopted Phase 2/Edge. While I agree that your phone, my own gear included has used GPRS services in the past, all things where not equal. First, I was always with T-Mobile/Voicestream. If I went to AT&T, I WOULD NOT HAVE HAD GPRS. Same went with Cingular. I agree, most Europe and Asian carriers support GPRS but in America, our hands have been tied.

    Look at poor Sprint. Their network is already crawling in some places that their new 2.5G services are running on.

    I am a developer of applications for the Treo family and I can tell you that working with these USA standard are less than fun.
  20. #20  
    Thegman,

    You got me curious. What kind of applications are you developing for the Treo family? Any out yet?
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